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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Leesburg in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Temple Hall

 
 
Temple Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 12, 2008
1. Temple Hall Marker
Inscription. Temple Hall was the home of William Temple Thomson Mason, son of Thomson Mason of Raspberry Plain and nephew of George Mason, author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights. The house was constructed about 1810 and was the centerpiece for the farm Mason established on property inherited from his father's vast estate. Mason and his wife, Ann Eliza Carroll of Maryland, raised ten children at Temple Hall. In addition to the Mason family, about twenty enslaved African-Americans resided on the property.

Mason's farm was modestly successful. He cultivated orchards, raised corn, wheat and livestock.

The house was a hub of Leesburg social activity and welcomed many distinguished guests. On August 9, 1825, President John Quincy Adams, former President James Monroe and the Marquis de Lafayette came to Temple Hall for the baptism of Mason's two youngest daughters.

In 1857, Mason retired to Washington, D.C., and sold his farm to Henry A. Ball. With the outbreak of the Civil War, the Ball family found themselves living on the front line between two hostile nations. Two of Henry Ball's sons left the farm to join the Confederate Army. In 1862, Henry Ball was arrested for refusing to take an oath of allegiance to the Federal Government. He was released after spending nearly a year in the Old Capitol Prison.

Confederate
Interpretive Markers at Temple Hall Farm Park image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 12, 2008
2. Interpretive Markers at Temple Hall Farm Park
Colonel John S. Mosby visited Temple Hall on July 5, 1864, and dined with the Ball family. While at the house, Mosby received information that led to the raid on Mount Zion Church.

Temple Hall remained in the Ball family until 1878 when it was sold at auction. In 1940, after a succession of owners, the property was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Symington. The Symingtons set about restoring the house and making improvements to the farm.

In 1985, Temple Hall Farm was acquired by the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority in order to preserve the land and give future generations the opportunity to appreciate the experience of an American working farm.
 
Erected by Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.
 
Location. 39° 10.741′ N, 77° 31.71′ W. Marker is near Leesburg, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker is on Temple Hall Lane 0.1 miles north of Limestone School Road (County Route 661), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Located in the Temple Hall Farm Regional Park. Marker is in this post office area: Leesburg VA 20176, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Creation of Temple Hall Farm Regional Park (here, next to this marker); Temple Hall Farm Regional Park's Role in Preserving
Temple Hall image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 12, 2008
3. Temple Hall
Photo showing the back of Temple Hall. The house is currently a private residence adjacent to the park.
(here, next to this marker); 1862 Antietam Campaign (approx. 1.7 miles away in Maryland); White’s Ferry (approx. 1.7 miles away in Maryland); Gettysburg Campaign (approx. 1.7 miles away in Maryland); The Confederate Monument (approx. 1.8 miles away in Maryland); a different marker also named White’s Ferry (approx. 1.8 miles away in Maryland); Chesapeake & Ohio Canal (approx. 1.8 miles away in Maryland). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Leesburg.
 
More about this marker. On the left side of the marker are portraits of William Temple Thomson Mason and Ann Eliza Carroll Mason.
 
Also see . . .  Temple Hall. (PDF) National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. (Submitted on August 1, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USWar, US Civil
 
William Temple Tompson Mason image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 30, 2017
4. William Temple Tompson Mason
William Temple Tompson Mason
Ann Eliza Carroll Mason image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 30, 2017
5. Ann Eliza Carroll Mason
Close-up of portrait on marker
Temple Hall image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 30, 2017
6. Temple Hall
Temple Hall image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 30, 2017
7. Temple Hall
Drawing in Visitors Center Temple Hall Regional Park.
Private Residence image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 30, 2017
8. Private Residence
The historic house at 15829 Temple Hall Lane is private property and inaccessible to visitors.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 9, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,560 times since then and 213 times this year. Last updated on August 1, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on August 1, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8. submitted on August 2, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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