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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Kootenai National Forest

 
 
Kootenai National Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 11, 2017
1. Kootenai National Forest Marker
Inscription.
The forest is in the extreme northwest corner of Montana and northeast Idaho and includes four ranger districts. The background photo is of the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness with views of Little Ibex, Ibex and Lentz Peaks. Managing vegetation and fuels, and the production of resources, such as timber and mining, contribute to people's livelihoods and remains one of the cornerstones of this Forest. Two large rivers, the Kootenai and the Clark Fork, along with several smaller rivers are major features of the Forest. The diversity of tree species is among the greatest in the northwest. Management and recovery of threatened and endangered species, such as grizzly bear, lynx, and bull trout, emphasize the forest wildlife and fisheries in the program. There are many recreational opportunities such as biking, fishing, hiking, hunting, skiing, snowmobiling and scenic drives.


Captions:

The Upper Ford Ranger House in 1933, site of the Capitol Christmas Tree. Upper Ford Ranger Station was officially established in 1924 and the existing "Ranger House" built in 1926. The office/warehouse was built by the CCC in 1933, and is one of the very few combination-style Forest Service buildings still standing. The lower floor of the building originally served as an office and a warehouse, and included a kitchen
Kootenai National Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 11, 2017
2. Kootenai National Forest Marker
area. Upstairs was a sleeping area.

The Capitol Christmas Tree is on the right side of the Upper Ford Warehouse in 2017.

Eureka Montana located within the Rexford Ranger District, was once considered the Christmas Tree Capitol of the World, with over 80 million trees cut from the area in the 1930's, 40's and 50's.

Wanless Lake on the Cabinet Ranger District is the largest lake in the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness, measuring one mile long.

Wanless Lake on the Cabinet Ranger District is the largest lake in the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness, measuring one mile long.

Big Creek Baldy Lookout Tower on the Libby Ranger District

The Swinging Bridge crossing the Kootenai River on the Three Rivers Ranger District.

 
Erected 2017 by Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
 
Location. 38° 53.383′ N, 77° 0.673′ W. Marker is in The National Mall, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from First Street Southwest near Garfield Circle SW, on the right. Touch for map. On the grounds of the U.S. Capitol Building. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20016, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Capitol Square, SW (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line);
2017 Capitol Christmas Tree image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 11, 2017
3. 2017 Capitol Christmas Tree
Capitol Square, NW (about 400 feet away); James A. Garfield (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Capitol Square (about 400 feet away); Naval Monument (about 500 feet away); Ulysses S. Grant Memorial (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Capitol Square (about 500 feet away); United States Botanic Garden (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in The National Mall.
 
Categories. Horticulture & Forestry
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 13, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 11, 2017, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 61 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 11, 2017, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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