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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Waterville in Kennebec County, Maine — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Immigration

The Museum in the Streets

 
 
Immigration Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 2, 2017
1. Immigration Marker
Inscription.
The Franco-Americans who settled in the Central Maine area in the 19th and early 20th centuries came for the most part from Quebec counties bordering Maine, such as Beauce and Frontenac. Eventually, other immigrants from Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and other more remote counties in Quebec, such as those on the Gaspe Peninsula, came here to settle. Although their reasons for coming were varied, most came to find work which was available in the mill towns along Maine's principal rivers.

Most of those who came to Waterville lived in the neighborhoods called "the Flats" ("Le Elatte") and "the Plains" ("La Plaine”), settling along the river, close to their work place. Entire families or individuals came here on foot and in horse-drawn buggies. After the Civil War, a few came by train.
 
Erected by Franco American Heritage Society of Kennebec Valley, citizens of Waterville, and City of Waterville, Maine. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Location. 44° 32.836′ N, 69° 37.788′ W. Marker is in Waterville, Maine, in Kennebec County. Marker is on Water Street south of Spring Street (Maine Route 137), on the right. Touch for map. Marker is a composite plaque, mounted directly
Marker detail: Horse-drawn buggys on the street image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Horse-drawn buggys on the street
on the fence, beside the sidewalk, overlooking the lower parking lot at this location. Marker is at or near this postal address: 11 Water Street, Waterville ME 04901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Waterville Maine WWI Marker (approx. 0.3 miles away); Waterville Maine Veteran's Park (approx. 0.3 miles away); Waterville Maine Civil War Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fort Halifax Park (approx. half a mile away); Fort Halifax (approx. 0.6 miles away); Heritage of the Kennebec River (approx. 3.2 miles away); a different marker also named Heritage of the Kennebec River (approx. 3.3 miles away); VFW 6924 Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waterville.
 
More about this marker. Marker may be difficult to see, particularly in the summer, due to extensive vine growth on the fence supporting the marker. Marker inscription is printed in both English and French.
 
Also see . . .
1. Events in Waterville History.
in 1754, the first permanent white settlement of the area was established. It centered around General John Winslow’s Fort Halifax, where the Sebasticook joins the Kennebec below the Ticonic Falls. 11 families settled in the area, but as word spread that
Marker detail: Charles & Therese Giroux family, Lockwood home at 117 Kennebec St. ca. 1896 image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Charles & Therese Giroux family, Lockwood home at 117 Kennebec St. ca. 1896
the area under the protection of the Fort was safe from attack, other settlers came. The wilderness was rugged and the winters long and cold, but the bounty and power of the rivers of the area proved to draw those of sturdy stock. (Submitted on April 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Waterville, Maine - The Museum in the Streets.
Waterville's strong French roots and rich cultural history were long unrecognized by inhabitants. Local historians wanted to bring the town's francophone past to light and honor their ancestors' contribution to the development of the town and its industry. Their collaboration with The Museum in the Streets became the basis of an annual Franco-American Festival. (Submitted on April 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. A Short History of Waterville, Maine.
Europeans began eyeing this area as early as 1498, when Sebastian Cabot sailed the coast of Maine and across Massachusetts Bay, initially believing he had found Asia. Upon clarifying the geography, he claimed for the English all the country between Labrador and New York. It wasn't long before French explorers countered the English claim, and for many years the two countries each continued to make competitive land claims. (Submitted on April 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
Immigration Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 2, 2017
4. Immigration Marker (wide view)

 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 12, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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