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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bainbridge in Decatur County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Village of Fowltown

 
 
Village of Fowltown Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, May 16, 2012
1. Village of Fowltown Marker
Inscription. In this vicinity stood the Seminole village of Fowltown, scene of battle, Nov. 21, 1817, which marked the beginning of the First Seminole Indian War. The engagement resulted when Major Twiggs with 250 soldiers from Fort Scott attempted to arrest its warriors for depredations against the white frontier. A second conflict occurred at the village and nearby swamp Nov. 23rd, 1817, U.S. Soldiers being led by Lt. Col. Arbuckle. On Jan. 4, 1818, the village was found deserted and destroyed.
 
Erected 1994 by Historical Chattahoochee Commission, Decatur County Historical Society and Friends.
 
Location. 30° 47.942′ N, 84° 36.619′ W. Marker is in Bainbridge, Georgia, in Decatur County. Marker is at the intersection of Faceville Highway (Georgia Route 97) and McLauchlin Road (Private), on the left when traveling south on Faceville Highway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bainbridge GA 39819, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Charles James Munnerlyn / “Refuge” (approx. 0.7 miles away); Ira Sanborn (approx. 3.7 miles away); First United Methodist Church (approx. 7 miles away);
Village of Fowltown Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, May 16, 2012
2. Village of Fowltown Marker
Camp Recovery (approx. 7 miles away); First Presbyterian Church (approx. 7.6 miles away); Steamboats (approx. 7.6 miles away); Fort Scott (approx. 7.7 miles away); In Memory of Revolutionary Soldiers (approx. 7.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bainbridge.
 
Regarding Village of Fowltown. Despite the marker, the attack on Fowltown was not because of "its warriors depredations against the white frontier". The issue was sovereignty of the land south of the Flint River. This land had been ceded to the United States by Creek (Muscogee) Indians in the Treaty of Fort Jackson. The Mikosuki Indians inhabiting Fowltown, though ethnically related to the Creeks, held that they were not party to the treaty, it did not apply to them, and the Creeks had no authority to "give away" this land. They also maintained that the Flint River was the northern border of Spanish Florida. The U.S. army made it clear to the Mikosuki that their position was militarily unsustainable, and they abandoned the land and relocated Fowltown to what is today Jefferson County, Florida. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fowltown
Village of Fowltown Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, May 16, 2012
3. Village of Fowltown Marker
To the left of the marker is the private, gated McLaughlin Road.

 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
Village of Fowltown Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, May 16, 2012
4. Village of Fowltown Marker
Looking south on Faceville Highway, Georgia Highway 97.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 18, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 25, 2012, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 594 times since then and 40 times this year. Last updated on April 25, 2018, by Daniel Eisenberg of Boca Raton, Florida. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 25, 2012, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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