Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Denver in Denver County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Local Transit Through the Ages

Look How Far We've Come

 

—1871-Present —

 
Local Transit Through the Ages Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2018
1. Local Transit Through the Ages Marker
Inscription.
"Visitors to Denver will certainly find a great improvement because they will… step aboard any one of the different lines right at the door of Union Station."
The Denver Post, May 26, 1918
(opening day of the Denver Tramway Loop)

Local transit service to Union Station began with horse cars plodding up and down 17th Street. The first line, run by the Denver Horse Railway Company, was constructed in 1871. It extended from 6th and Larimer into Five Points and Curtis Park, which were Denver's first streetcar suburbs. By 1900, electric streetcars operated by the Denver City Railway traveled to streetcar suburbs throughout the growing city.

In those early days, train tracks – used by the Union Pacific and Denver & Rio Grande railroads for long freight trains - ran down Wynkoop Street directly in front of Union Station. Imagine the frustration of passengers trying to make a connection when long trains blocked their way!

In 1918, the Denver Tramway Company constructed a loop to alleviate passenger delays and provide a turnabout for the streetcars. Look down at street level to the left and catch a glimpse of the old tramway loop. Covered by a parking lot in 1948, the loop was unearthed during the 2014 station renovation. Today, RTD's trains and buses follow
Local Transit Through the Ages Marker (<i>wide view; old tramway loop visible left of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2018
2. Local Transit Through the Ages Marker (wide view; old tramway loop visible left of marker)
many of the same routes as the horse cars and streetcars before them.
 
Location. 39° 45.137′ N, 105° 0.041′ W. Marker is in Denver, Colorado, in Denver County. Marker is on Wynkoop Street north of 16th Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located on the pedestrian plaza walkway, near the southeast corner of the Union Station block. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1605 Wynkoop Steet, Denver CO 80202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Barteldes, Hartig Building (within shouting distance of this marker); C. S. Morey Mercantile Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Union Station Area (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Union Station Timeline (about 300 feet away); Welcome to Union Station (about 300 feet away); The People of the Station (about 300 feet away); Denver City Railway Building (about 400 feet away); Henry Lee Building - 1907 (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Denver.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Denver Union Station
 
Also see . . .
1. The Denver Horse Railway Company.
The story of the Horse Barn dates back to 1867, when the Colorado Territorial Legislature granted The Denver Horse Railway Company
Marker detail: Original Union Station image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Original Union Station
From 1882-1892, Denver City Railway occupied much of the building that still stands on the northeast corner of 17th and Wynkoop. This 1884 view shows horse cars coming in and out of the stables in front of the original Union Station.
exclusive charter to operate in Denver. Operation began in 1871 with two miles of track between 7th and Larimer to the area now known as Curtis Park. In 1872, with a modified name, The Denver Railway Company built the Horse Barn in the city’s northeast hinterlands at 33rd and Arapahoe.
(Submitted on June 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Denver Tramway Company.
Denver’s streetcar system began 12 years after the founding of the city and physically shaped Denver as we know it today. The story of Denver’s streetcar system tells the evolution of the city, which is still evident in Denver’s embedded commercial districts that emerged as key stops on the robust streetcar network. For nearly 40 years, Denver streetcars transported passengers throughout the city. At the height of trolley operations the Denver Tramway Company owned more than 160 miles of track and operated over 250 streetcars. By 1950 only 64 cars were still in use as motor buses began to take favor. After being decommissioned in 1950, the Denver Tramway Company sold the old trolleys for $100 each. (Submitted on June 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars
 
Marker detail: Denver's early streetcars image. Click for full size.
4. Marker detail: Denver's early streetcars
Denver's early streetcars expanded from downtown into Capitol Hill, Curtis Park, and Highlands. This view, circa 1900, shows trolleys passing the Daniels & Fisher (D&F) Tower on 16th Street. By 1924, Denver Tramway began operating motor buses, which, by 1950 had completely replaced the streetcars. In 1971, Denver Tramway transferred its assets to Denver Metro Transit, which in 1974, became part of the Regional Transportation District that you ride today.
Local Transit Through the Ages Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2018
5. Local Transit Through the Ages Marker (tall view)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 13, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 53 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on June 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.