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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Courtland in Southampton County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Virginia Native Tribes/First Americans

 
 
Virginia Native Tribes/First Americans Marker. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, November 5, 2017
1. Virginia Native Tribes/First Americans Marker.
Inscription. In 1600, there were approximately 40 tribes in Virginia. Today, the Commonwealth officially recognizes only eleven tribes.

When the Jamestown Settlers arrived in Virginia in 1607, they encountered several Virginia Tribes. The Chesapeake Tribe of Western Tidewater was the first to make contract with these explorers upon their stop at what is now referred to as First Landing (Cape Henry) in Virginia Beach, VA. It is noted that the Chesapeake Indian, (some scholars believe were Iroquoian), were annihilated by the Powhatan Empire because of a suspected trade agreement with explorers.

The Palisade fort, long/round houses and fire pits in this 17th Century area replica is a close facsimile of the Cheroenhaka (Nottoway) Indian Village described by William Byrd upon his visit to what is now Southampton County on April 7 & 8, 1728.

(left map legend, listed here alphabetically)
Cheroenhaka (Nottoway), Cherokee, Manahoac, Meherrin, Mohetan, Monacan, Nahyssam, Occaneechi, Saponi, Tauxenent, Tutelo

(right map legend, listed here alphabetically)
Accohannock, Accomac, Appamattuck, Arrohatock, Chesapeake, Chickahominy, Chiskiack, Cuttatawomen, Eastern Chickahominy, Kecoughtan, Mattaponi, Moraughtacund, Nansemond, Nantaughtacund, Onawmanient, Opiscopank,
The Virginia Native Tribes/First Americans marker. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, November 5, 2017
2. The Virginia Native Tribes/First Americans marker.
Pictured in the background is a palisade fort. Inside its walls are the long/round houses (pictured left and center, respectively).
Pamunkey, Paspahegh, Patawomeck (Potomac), Piankatank, Pissaseck, Powhatan, Rappahannock, Sekakawton, Tapahanock, Upper Mattaponi, Warraskoyack, Werowocomoco, Weyanock, Wiccocomico, Youghtanund
 
Erected by Cheroenaka (Nottoway) Indian Tribe.
 
Location. 36° 41.178′ N, 77° 2.581′ W. Marker is in Courtland, Virginia, in Southampton County. Marker can be reached from Aquia Path half a mile west of Old Bridge Road (Virginia Route 742), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 27345 Aquia Path, Courtland VA 23837, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. General Thomas' Birthplace (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Rebecca Vaughan House (approx. 1.9 miles away); Southampton County Veterans Memorial (approx. 2.3 miles away); Mahone’s Tavern (approx. 2.3 miles away); Courtland School — Rosenwald Funded (approx. 2.8 miles away); Old Indian Reservation (approx. 2.9 miles away); The Hand Site (approx. 3 miles away); Marle Hill (approx. 3.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Courtland.
 
More about this marker. The marker stands outside the Native Palisade Fort in Palisade Village. It is reachable by two walking
The long house. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, November 5, 2017
3. The long house.
trails that support vehicle travel also. A wooded area separates the village from Cattashowrock Town. The area is opened to the public for special tours and events.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Read about archaeological finds related to the Cheroenhaka (Nottoway) and Cheseapake Indians.
 
Also see . . .  Cheroenhaka (Nottoway) website. (Submitted on July 18, 2018, by Cynthia L. Clark of Suffolk, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative Americans
 
The round house. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, November 5, 2017
4. The round house.
Inter-tribal dancers at the November 2017 Powwow. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, November 5, 2017
5. Inter-tribal dancers at the November 2017 Powwow.
Note the red flag pole (foreground) and wooden pole carved with a head background.
The main entrance sign to Cheroenhaka (Nottoway) Indian Territory. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, November 5, 2017
6. The main entrance sign to Cheroenhaka (Nottoway) Indian Territory.
This sign stands at the intersection of Route 742 and Cattashowrock Trail. Mascots for nine clans are listed: Bear, Beaver, Deer, Eel, Hawk (Southampton County), Heron, Snipe, and Wolf.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 19, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 18, 2018, by Cynthia L. Clark of Suffolk, Virginia. This page has been viewed 44 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 18, 2018, by Cynthia L. Clark of Suffolk, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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