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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
White Bluff in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

White Bluff Meeting House

American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site

 
 
White Bluff Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
1. White Bluff Meeting House Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  Here meets the oldest congregation following the Reformed (Calvinistic) theological tradition in continuous service in Georgia. In 1737, 160 Reformed Germans came to Savannah seeking religious freedom. After working their terms as indentured servants the colonists petitioned the Trustees of the colony for a Reformed minister. In August, 1745 the Trustees acceded to the petition and ranted a two-acre tract for the church and a glebe of land for the support of the ministry. The glebe land was officially granted by King George II in 1759. The first minister was John Joakim Zulby who also served in the Second Continental Congress.
 
Erected 1980 by Georgia Historic Marker. (Marker Number 025-92/98.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 31° 59.159′ N, 81° 7.739′ W. Marker is in White Bluff, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on White Bluff Road north of Magnolia Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31419, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
White Bluff Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 2008
2. White Bluff Meeting House Marker
At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Haven Home Industrial Training School (approx. 1.1 miles away); Vernonburg (approx. 1.3 miles away); Capture of the USS "Water Witch" (approx. 1.4 miles away); St. Joseph's Hospital (approx. 1˝ miles away); Nicholsonboro (approx. 1.8 miles away); Brick Pillar (approx. 2.7 miles away); Pin Point Community (approx. 2.8 miles away); Bethesda (approx. 2.8 miles away).
 
Regarding White Bluff Meeting House. As mentioned on the marker, "glebe" refers to a plot of land belonging or yielding profit to an English parish church or an ecclesiastical office.

The White Bluff Presbyterian Church is one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location unknown).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

The White Bluff congregation was the first of the Reformed tradition in Georgia. As early as February 1743, a group of German emigrants began to petition the Trustees of the Colony of Georgia for land upon which to build a church. In 1759, King George II, confirmed
White Bluff Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 2008
3. White Bluff Meeting House Marker
With Windsor Forest Presbyterian Church school in the background.
the Trust Colony gift of two acres. In 1745, the first church building, which also served as a school, was built on the site. The present and probably fourth church building was erected in 1962.

 
Categories. Churches & ReligionColonial EraNotable Places
 
White Bluff Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
4. White Bluff Meeting House Marker
In front of Windsor Forest Presbyterian Church.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 28, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,086 times since then and 32 times this year. Last updated on August 15, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1. submitted on January 10, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4. submitted on July 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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