Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Carrabelle in Franklin County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Legend of Tate's Hell

 
 
The Legend of Tate's Hell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 7, 2018
1. The Legend of Tate's Hell Marker
Inscription.  Jebediah Tate was a superstitious farmer that lived northwest of Carrabelle in Sumatra Florida. His only son was born just before the war and he named him Cebe. Jebediah was a Civil War veteran, and his wife was half Cherokee Indian. He bought 160 acres for $5 as a homestead grant after the war.

Cebe Tate helped clear his father's land, chased cattle, and gathered pine oil. His mother died from yellow fever sometime after the war. It was hard going, and Cebe's father made a pact with a local medicine man for good fortune. As long as they stayed out of the tiny cypress forest and gave him one pig a year, they would have good fortune.

For three years, they gave up a pig when the medicine man came around, and things were good. But in 1874, they decided to keep the pig and deny the old Indian. The Medicine man warned them that they would not only see hard times, but they would go through hell. That year Cebe's father died from malaria, the pine trees gave very little oil, the sugar cane was stunted, and scrub cows started to disappear. But the pigs ate good, and multiplied so fast Cebe had to build two new pig pens in the fall.
Marker detail: Jebediah Tate image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Jebediah Tate
In the Florida archives this photo is identified as Civil War veteran Jebediah Tate.


In the spring of 1875, Cebe married a mail-order bride from New York City. She was a fiery German immigrant. But there was a problem, Cebe only had pigs left, and she was of the Jewish Faith. She ate corn, potatoes, and pancakes with molasses, but she wanted beef. Cebe took off into the woods to find a cow, any cow, to quiet his bride.

Armed with a shotgun and accompanied by his hunting dogs, he journeyed into the swamp in search of a cow. His dogs took off chasing a panther, and he lost his gun in the mud. Tate was lost in the swamp for seven days and nights. He went into the Dwarf Cypress stand to escape the relentless bugs, and fell asleep against the trees that were protected by the Indian's magic.

He awoke when bitten by a snake and ran blindly thru the swamp, delirious from the bite and from drinking the murky waters. Finally he came to a clearing near Carrabelle, living only long enough to murmur the words, "My name is Cebe Tate, and I just came through Hell!"

And ever since, our legendary and forbidden swamp has been called Tate's Hell.
 
Erected by Carrabelle History Museum.
 
Location. 29° 51.024′ N, 84° 39.868′ W. Marker is in Carrabelle, Florida, in Franklin County. Marker is on Avenue B South (Business
"Tate's Hell" Motion Picture (<i>right side panel of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 7, 2018
3. "Tate's Hell" Motion Picture (right side panel of marker)
U.S. 98) east of Marine Street, on the right when traveling west. Marker is mounted on the east wall of an art gallery building. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 109 Avenue B South, Carrabelle FL 32322, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Marvin N. Justiss Building (a few steps from this marker); World's Smallest Police Station (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); World War II D-Day Training Site (approx. 2.2 miles away); Camp Gordon Johnston Training Area (approx. 2.3 miles away); Crooked River Lighthouse History (approx. 2.7 miles away); Camp Gordon Johnston (approx. 4.4 miles away); William Augustus Bowles (approx. 13.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This is very large "billboard-style" marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tate's Hell State Forest. Tate's Hell State Forest is one continuous tract of land comprising over 202,437 acres. Conquering this wet and seemingly unproductive area for timber production was the focus of the timber industry from the 1950s to early 1990s. During the 1960s and 1970s, the hydrology was substantially altered in an attempt to establish extensive tracts of pine plantations and to enhance the production of pine timber. These alterations involved the construction of roads and associated ditches, followed by the planting of large, dense stands of slash pine that were fertilized with phosphorus and nitrogen. (Submitted on August 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. How Tate’s Hell State Forest Got its Name
Tate's Hell State Forest (<i>left side panel of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 7, 2018
4. Tate's Hell State Forest (left side panel of marker)
. Tate’s Hell State Forest is named after Cebe Tate, a 45 year old local farmer plagued by a panther that kept attacking his livestock. The year was 1875, a time when Florida was experiencing a population boom as homesteaders moved in on land formerly controlled by Native Americans. Although most Seminoles escaped the Trail of Tears by disappearing deep into the swamp that makes up most of Tate’s Hell State Forest, many Native Americans were rounded up for relocation in Oklahoma. The homesteaders didn’t have an easy time of it and rogue panthers were unwelcome pests. Cebe Tate decided to do something about his problem and headed into the forest with his shotgun and hunting dogs. (Submitted on August 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansParks & Recreational AreasScience & MedicineSettlements & Settlers
 
The Legend of Tate's Hell Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 7, 2018
5. The Legend of Tate's Hell Marker (wide view)
The Legend of Tate's Hell Marker (<i>wide view; marker mounted on east wall of an art gallery</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 7, 2018
6. The Legend of Tate's Hell Marker (wide view; marker mounted on east wall of an art gallery)
 

More. Search the internet for The Legend of Tate's Hell.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 10, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 116 times since then and 64 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement