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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Lexington in Rockbridge County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Timber Ridge Church

 
 
Timber Ridge Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dan Fisher, June 20, 2010
1. Timber Ridge Church Marker
Inscription. This Presbyterian Church was built in 1756, nineteen years after the first settlement in Rockbridge County.
 
Erected 1928 by Conservation & Development Commission. (Marker Number A-46.)
 
Location. 37° 50.58′ N, 79° 21.488′ W. Marker is near Lexington, Virginia, in Rockbridge County. Marker is at the intersection of Timber Ridge Road (Virginia Route 716) and Sam Houston Way (Virginia Route 785), on the right when traveling east on Timber Ridge Road. Touch for map. This marker is located at the Sam Houston Wayside. Marker is in this post office area: Lexington VA 24450, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Liberty Hall Academy (within shouting distance of this marker); Birthplace of Sam Houston (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Birthplace of Sam Houston (about 300 feet away); Red House and the McDowell Family (approx. 3.1 miles away); Dr. Ephraim McDowell (approx. 3.1 miles away); McDowell's Grave (approx. 3.1 miles away); Cherry Grove Estate (approx. 3.9 miles away); Jordan’s Point (approx. 5.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington.
 
Regarding Timber Ridge Church.
Timber Ridge Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dan Fisher, June 20, 2010
2. Timber Ridge Church Marker
Timber Ridge Old Stone Presbyterian Church was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1969. This church is also one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location unknown).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

The oldest church building in Rockbridge County, Timber Ridge was one of the sites of the Academy that became Washington and Lee University. Constructed in 1756, the original stone church is now the largest part of the present sanctuary. Sam Houston, Texas statesman, attended Timber Ridge as a child. His grandfather gave the land for the church. William Henry Ruffner, who became Virginia's first superintendent of education, was also a child of this congregation. John Brown, Timber Ridge's first pastor, presided at the organization of Lexington Presbytery here on 26 September 1786.
 
Also see . . .
1. Timber Ridge "Old Stone" Presbyterian Church. (Submitted on June 21, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. Timber Ridge Presbyterian Church (pdf file). National Register
Timber Ridge Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dan Fisher, June 20, 2010
3. Timber Ridge Church Marker
of Historic Places (Submitted on June 21, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

3. Timber Ridge Church NRHP Nomination page. (Submitted on August 20, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.)
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionSettlements & Settlers
 
Timber Ridge Church image. Click for full size.
National Register of Historic Places
4. Timber Ridge Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 4, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 21, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 774 times since then and 47 times this year. Last updated on August 20, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 21, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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