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Portsmouth in Hampshire County, England, United Kingdom
 

Warrior – the ultimate deterrent

 
 
Warrior – the ultimate deterrent Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 31, 2018
1. Warrior – the ultimate deterrent Marker
Inscription.
Fitting Out
The morning after her launch, Warrior was towed to the Victoria Dock basin, where Penn's of Greenwich installed the most powerful machinery ever put in a warship. With the engines and boilers in place the masts were then lowered into the ship allowing the process of rigging to begin.

The other tasks needed to convert the empty hull carried on, including the fitting of more than 200 armour plates, weighing more than 900 tons in total.

It was during this time that Charles Dickens visited the ship, writing later " a black, vicious ugly customer as ever I saw. Whale like in size, and with as terrible a row of incisor teeth as ever closed on a French frigate.”

First Commission
In May 1861 Captain Arthur Cochrane, the third son of Admiral Lord Thomas Cochrane, was appointed to command. He commissioned the ship into the Royal Navy on 1st August.

Warrior then moved to further down the Thames to embark guns and other necessary stores. On 19th September, with the finishing touches made, Warrior left for Portsmouth.

Sea trials led to minor modifications and, in 1862, she was ready for active service in the Channel Squadron, patrolling coastal waters and making voyages to Lisbon and Gibraltar.

In 1863, HMS Warrior and other ships
HMS Warrior image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 30, 2018
2. HMS Warrior
in the Channel Squadron took part in a 12-week round Britain cruise, visiting many different ports. As many as six thousand visitors a day came to marvel at this symbol of British naval power.

Although not the first iron ship, nor the first to use both sail and steam, Warrior combined these and other technological developments together and presented the greatest advance in ship design for centuries. She was the ultimate deterrent and never fired a shot in anger.

Did you know?... In April 1863 John Arbuthnot Fisher, later First Sea Lord and responsible for the development of Dreadnought battleship, joined Warrior as Gunnery Officer
 
Location. 50° 47.915′ N, 1° 6.514′ W. Marker is in Portsmouth, England, in Hampshire County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Route B2154 and Clock Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Located on the HMS Warrior pier in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. Marker is in this post office area: Portsmouth, England PO1 3QX, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The First Black Battleship (here, next to this marker); Left behind by progress (here, next to this marker); A Sad and Lonely Journey (here, next to this marker); The Figurehead
One of <i>Warrior </i>s 10 Rifled Breechloading 110-pounder Guns image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 31, 2018
3. One of Warrior s 10 Rifled Breechloading 110-pounder Guns
(here, next to this marker); Beware of the Wolf (here, next to this marker); RAF – HSL 102 (within shouting distance of this marker); Labour of Love (within shouting distance of this marker); Homecoming (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Portsmouth.
 
Also see . . .
1. HMS Warrior. (Submitted on September 11, 2018, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. HMS Warrior (1860) on Wikipedia. (Submitted on September 11, 2018, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
<i>Warrior </i>s Main Gun Deck image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 31, 2018
4. Warrior s Main Gun Deck
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 11, 2018, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 11, 2018, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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