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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
St. Louis, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

One Day, Three Nations

 
 
One Day, Three Nations Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 12, 2017
1. One Day, Three Nations Marker
Inscription. Here on March 9, 1804, Spanish Lieutenant Governor Charles Dehault Delassus met with US Army Captain Amos Stoddard to complete the Louisiana Purchase. Stoddard accepted the Upper Louisiana territory first for France and then for the United States. Spanish and American troops witnessed the momentous event—the territory transferred into American hands. Although the United States purchased the land from France, Spain had governed the territory for nearly forty years.

After the official transfer was signed, troops lowered the Spanish civilian flag and raised the French flag. The next day, they lowered the French flag and raised the American Stars and Stripes.

In one day, the United States doubled in size. New Orleans (Orleans Territory, later the State of Louisiana) was transferred earlier on December 20, 1803.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 37.4′ N, 90° 11.147′ W. Marker is in St. Louis, Missouri. Marker can be reached from Walnut Street east of Memorial Drive when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located on the Gateway Arch trail, just south of the arch, in Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Park. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Louis MO 63102, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
One Day, Three Nations Marker (<i>tall view; Gateway Arch in the background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 12, 2017
2. One Day, Three Nations Marker (tall view; Gateway Arch in the background)
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Conference, Society of Saint Vincent de Paul (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Basilica of Saint Louis, King (about 500 feet away); In Memory of Robert E. Lee (about 600 feet away); Rue des Granges (about 700 feet away); Rock Solid (about 700 feet away); New Country, New Rules (about 800 feet away); The Gateway Arch (approx. 0.2 miles away); Miles of Steamboats (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Louis.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally on waist-high posts.
 
Also see . . .  Jefferson Buys Louisiana Territory, and the Nation Moves Westward. The historic transaction is known as the Louisiana Purchase, but it was not something that Jefferson had sought to make at the time. He would have been content just to buy the port of New Orleans so the United States — not Spain, not France, certainly not Great Britain — could control the gateway to the Mississippi River, the main street of commerce in what was then the American West. But France's ruler at the time, Napoleon Bonaparte, was losing interest in establishing a North American empire and needed funds to fight the British, so he directed his emissaries to offer not just New Orleans but all of the Louisiana Territory to the Americans. Jefferson's envoys in Paris, without awaiting any direction from their President (which would have taken two months), accepted the deal and on April 30, 1803, signed the Louisiana Purchase Treaty. (Submitted on August 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraGovernmentNotable Events
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 16, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 35 times since then. Last updated on October 15, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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