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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Pierre in Stanley County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

South Dakota Railroads

 
 
South Dakota Railroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 18, 2016
1. South Dakota Railroads Marker
Inscription. Railroads were economically and socially important in South Dakota. They furthered new settlement, population growth, and community prosperity by recruiting homesteaders and platting townsites. Trains provided passenger traffic, transported farmers’ goods, and carried mail and newspapers. Depots were shipping, receiving, and telegraph centers. Railroads created jobs and attracted manufacturers to towns.

Rail lines reached the state in the 1870s and soon overtook river and overland wagon routes as the primary means of transportation. Initially, lines were concentrated on the rich agricultural region east of the Missouri River before moving west in the early 20th century. The Chicago and North Western (C&NW) and Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul companies controlled 73% of South Dakota's rail lines by 1900.

Automobiles eclipsed railroads in importance after WWII leaving most tracks abandoned by 1980. The South Dakota Rail Authority was created to prevent further abandonment. The Burlington Northern bought the Milwaukee main line. The Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern (DM&E) Railroad Company purchased the C&NW line. Traffic on the state's railroad system continues under stewardship of both railroads.

Sponsored by the South Dakota State Historical Society, a Preserve America grant, and the Dakota, Minnesota
South Dakota Railroads Marker (<i>wide view; looking east across Missouri River</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 18, 2016
2. South Dakota Railroads Marker (wide view; looking east across Missouri River)
and Eastern Railroad Corporation.

 
Erected by The South Dakota State Historical Society, a Preserve America grant, and the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad Corporation.
 
Location. 44° 22.367′ N, 100° 22.423′ W. Marker is in Fort Pierre, South Dakota, in Stanley County. Marker can be reached from Port Charlotte Avenue south of Jamison Drive, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located along the Missouri River walking path, on the south side of the Fort Pierre railroad bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Pierre SD 57532, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John C. Waldron (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old Deadwood Trail (approx. 0.2 miles away); American Indians and the Fur Trade (approx. 0.4 miles away); Lewis and Clark (approx. half a mile away); Pierre (approx. half a mile away); Pierre's First School (approx. half a mile away); Walter H. Burke (approx. one mile away); Alexander McDonald Putello (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Pierre.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally, on waist-high posts. Marker is weathered and faded; the exhibited
South Dakota Railroads Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible at left, beside walking path</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 18, 2016
3. South Dakota Railroads Marker (wide view; marker visible at left, beside walking path)
photographs are difficult to see.
 
Also see . . .
1. Chicago and North Western Transportation Company. The C&NW became one of the longest railroads in the United States as a result of mergers with other railroads, such as the Chicago Great Western Railway, Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway and others. By 1995, track sales and abandonment had reduced the total mileage to about 5,000. The majority of the abandoned and sold lines were lightly trafficked branches in Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. (Submitted on October 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. In 1874, the name was changed to Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul after absorbing the Chicago & Pacific Railroad Company. By 1887, the railroad had lines running through Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. (Submitted on October 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars
 
Railroad Bridge across Missouri River (<i>view from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 18, 2016
4. Railroad Bridge across Missouri River (view from marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 23, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 20, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 39 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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