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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gainesville in Alachua County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Devil's Millhopper

Registered Natural Landmark

 
 
Devil's Millhopper Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2011
1. Devil's Millhopper Marker
Inscription.
Devilís Millhopper
has been designated a

Registered
Natural Landmark


This site possesses exceptional value
as an illustration of the Nationís natural
heritage and contributes to a better
understanding of manís environment

1976

National Park Service
United States Department of the Interior

 
Erected 1976 by National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 29° 42.42′ N, 82° 23.675′ W. Marker is in Gainesville, Florida, in Alachua County. Marker can be reached from Millhopper Road (NW 53rd Avenue) ľ mile east of NW 52nd Terrace, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located within Devil's Millhopper Geological State Park, along the main trail, near the "Devil's Millhopper" overlook, about 2/10 mile north of the parking lot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4732 Millhopper Road, Gainesville FL 32653, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Forced into Service (approx. 2.9 miles away); Mt. Pleasant Cemetery
Devil's Millhopper (<i>boardwalk staircase leading down into the sink hole</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2011
2. Devil's Millhopper (boardwalk staircase leading down into the sink hole)
(approx. 3.9 miles away); Fort Clarke (approx. 4.2 miles away); Gatorade's Birthplace (approx. 4.8 miles away); The Bailey House (approx. 4.9 miles away); University of Florida Historic Campus (approx. 4.9 miles away); Florida Extension (approx. 5 miles away); Bryan Hall (approx. 5.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gainesville.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large metal plaque, mounted vertically on a large boulder.
 
Regarding Devil's Millhopper. National Natural Landmark (1976); National Register of Historic Places (in part for its surviving Civilian Conservation Corps infrastructure) (2017)
 
Also see . . .
1. Devil's Millhopper Geological State Park. Devil's Millhopper Geological State Park is a National Natural Landmark that has been visited by the curious since the early 1880s. Researchers have learned a great deal about Florida's natural history by studying fossil shark teeth, marine shells and the fossilized remains of extinct land animals found in the sink. The sinkhole is 120 feet deep and 500 feet across. A one-half mile nature trail
Devil's Millhopper (<i>boardwalk staircase leading down into the sink hole</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2011
3. Devil's Millhopper (boardwalk staircase leading down into the sink hole)
follows the rim, and there is a 232-step stairway to the bottom of the sink. The state purchased this site in 1974, and the stairs were completed in 1976. Until that time, access in the area was limited. (Submitted on October 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Devil's Millhopper Geological State Park. The cutaway, limestone sides of the sinkhole provide an easily visible geological record of the area. Twelve springs, some more visible than others, feed the pond at the bottom of the sinkhole. In the summer, the bottom of the sinkhole is dramatically cooler than the air at the surface due to the depth and shade from the canopy above. Significant fossil deposits include shark teeth, marine shells, and the fossilized remains of extinct land animals. (Submitted on October 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. EnvironmentLandmarksNatural FeaturesParks & Recreational Areas
 
Devil's Millhopper (<i>boardwalk staircase leading up from the sink hole</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2011
4. Devil's Millhopper (boardwalk staircase leading up from the sink hole)
Devil's Millhopper Marker State Park Sign (<i>turn in here to access marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2011
5. Devil's Millhopper Marker State Park Sign (turn in here to access marker)
Devil's Millhopper State Park Map (<i>located at a kiosk near the Visitors Center</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2011
6. Devil's Millhopper State Park Map (located at a kiosk near the Visitors Center)
Ever since the earth was formed its face has been constantly changing. Volcanoes have erupted, mountains have been uplifted and worn down by erosion, glaciers have advanced and retreated, continents have been shaped and reshaped by the rise and fall of the oceans, and each rain etches and carves the land surface as well as the bedrock into which it seeps. The story of Devil's Millhopper is one act in nature's continuing drama called “change.”

During the last century, the grist mill was a familiar place to most rural families. Grain was fed into the mill from a funnel-shaped container called a “hopper.” The early homesteaders of this region found this sink to resemble a large millhopper which could feed grain into the Devil's Mill at the center of the earth. Thus the name — “Devil's Millhopper.”
Florida Geologic Site Panel (<i>located at a kiosk near the Visitors Center</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2011
7. Florida Geologic Site Panel (located at a kiosk near the Visitors Center)
Under the provisions of Chapter 377.075(4)(e)
Florida Statutes, Devil's Millhopper
has been designated a
Florida State Geologic Site
Devil's Millhopper, an impressive sinkhole, primarily exposes sediments of the Upper Eocene (37 million years old) Ocala Limestone and the Lower to Middle Miocene (24 to 10 million years old) Hawthorn Group. A few feet of the Ocala Limestone can be seen at the base of the sinkhole. The Hawthorn Group phosphatic sands, clays and dolostones are approximately 105 feet thick with a few feet of undifferentiated sands comprising the surface layer. Throughout much of the state, the Hawthorn Group sediments function as water-bearing aquifers or more often as low permeability aquitards. These sediments are also extensively mined for phosphate in northern and central Florida. The sinkhole formed when sediments overlying the Ocala Limestone collapsed into cavities dissolved in the limestone by ground water. Though covered with lush vegetation, Devil's Millhopper is one of the best natural exposures of the Hawthorn Group in Florida. This sinkhole occurs within the Alachua-Lake City Karst Hills geomorphic zone of the Okeefenokee Basin District.
Designated October 9, 2000
Dr. Walter Schmidt,
Florida State Geologist
Florida Geological Survey
Devil's Millhopper CCC Trail Marker (<i>located in "millhopper," at base of boardwalk staircase</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2011
8. Devil's Millhopper CCC Trail Marker (located in "millhopper," at base of boardwalk staircase)
This railroad tie is a remnant of an old trail system built during the 1930ís by the Civilian Conservation Corps. Being elevated, the present stairway has the advantage of eliminating all foot traffic which causes undue erosion and compaction of soil.
Devils Millhopper 1930's CCC Railroad Tie Remnant image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2011
9. Devils Millhopper 1930's CCC Railroad Tie Remnant
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 2, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 20, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 42 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   3. submitted on October 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   4. submitted on October 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   5. submitted on October 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   6, 7, 8. submitted on October 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   9. submitted on October 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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