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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling (JBAB) in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Giesboro Park

5. Calvary Depot

 
 
Giesboro Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
1. Giesboro Park Marker
Inscription. The Gisborough Estate (1680-1890) was a large colonial land grant that included part of what is now Bolling Air Force Base. That name eventually came to be spelled "Giesboro" and from 1863 to 1866 this area was the location of a large cavalry depot for the Union Army, and an adjoining cavalry base, Camp Stoneman. The Giesboro plantation residence was located in the area that now comprises Giesboro Park.
 
Location. 38° 51.634′ N, 77° 0.184′ W. Marker is in Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling (JBAB), District of Columbia, in Washington. Touch for map. Located at the entrance to the athletic fields in Giesboro Park. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20032, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. T-28 Trojan (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hillsdale (approx. 0.4 miles away); Barry Farm Dwellings (approx. 0.4 miles away); Grandpapa's Farm (approx. 0.4 miles away); Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); Barry Farm - Hillsdale (was approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing. ); Roads That Divide (approx. half a mile away); The Curative Powers of Nature (approx. half a mile away).
 
Regarding Giesboro Park. Current
Giesboro Park Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
2. Giesboro Park Entrance
description indicates: "This wartime photo looks from the high ground near where today South Capital Street and Interstate 278 pass." There is no such intersection in that area. Possibly, the writer meant near where South Capital Street and Interstate 295 are today.
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Giesboro Today image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
3. Giesboro Today
No vestiges of Camp Stoneman or the depot exist today. The ridge line paralleling the Potomac River at this point (in the distance beyond the houses) was heavily fortified during the Civil War. The cavalry camp occupied the low ground between the ridge and the river. Since the 1860s land has been reclaimed from the river, new road structures in place, and new buildings erected.
Band at Camp Stoneman image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress Collection
4. Band at Camp Stoneman
A view of the camp streets when the cavalry camp was in use. Today the United States Air Force Band uses several buildings on the Air Base.
[Libray of Congress: Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 / compiled by Hirst D. Milhollen and Donald H. Mugridge, Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress, 1977. No. 0782, Call number LC-B817- 7350]
Cavalry Depot image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress Collection
5. Cavalry Depot
This wartime photo looks from the high ground near where today South Capital Street and Interstate 278 pass. Several distinctive "Sibley" tents are arranged on the low ground. In the distant right center is a rather prominent building, that may be the U.S. Capital dome. If so, then the camera was angled almost due north, looking across the Anacostia River. The photo is dated May 1864.
[Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, Call Number LC-B817- 7015[P&P]]
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 7, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 4,329 times since then and 140 times this year. Last updated on November 4, 2018, by Nancy Deane of New Bern, North Carolina. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 7, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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