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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Great Falls in Cascade County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

The Falls: Obstacle or Opportunity

 
 
The Falls: Obstacle or Opportunity Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2013
1. The Falls: Obstacle or Opportunity Marker
Inscription. For Meriwether Lewis in 1805, the falls were an obstacle on the journey to the Pacific. To Paris Gibson (near right) the falls were a source of great opportunity. As Gibson laid out the townsite of Great Falls he envisioned dams to harness the falls for electricity, mills to process wool from sheep, and railroads to ship goods and bring settlers. Gibson's dream for the city came true in part when the Great Northern Railroad reached Great Falls in 1887. Eventually four railroads served Great Falls.
 
Erected by Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition marker series.
 
Location. 47° 29.543′ N, 111° 18.405′ W. Marker is in Great Falls, Montana, in Cascade County. Marker can be reached from Overlook Drive south of 10th Avenue South (Business Interstate 15), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located beside the sidewalk, on the north side of the parking lot, in Broadwater Overlook Park, overlooking the Missouri River. Marker is in this post office area: Great Falls MT 59405, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Portage Around the Falls (here, next to this marker);
Marker detail: The Great Falls of the Missouri today. Ryan Dam was built in 1915. image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: The Great Falls of the Missouri today. Ryan Dam was built in 1915.
Commissary of the Plains (here, next to this marker); Cascade County Courthouse (approx. 1.1 miles away); A "great" Set of Falls (approx. 4.2 miles away); Pure Springs Along the Missouri River (approx. 4.6 miles away); These Springs Have Witnessed... (approx. 4.6 miles away); Where Does the Water Come From? (approx. 4.6 miles away); The Smallest River Runs Through It (approx. 4.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Great Falls.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally on waist-high metal posts. This is the center marker of a three-marker exhibit at this location.
 
Also see . . .
1. Paris Gibson. Gibson abandoned his failed business interests in Minnesota to try his luck out West and, in 1880, paid a visit to the Great Falls of the Missouri River and quickly recognized their potential for producing hydroelectric power. Gibson convinced his friend, railroad magnate James J. Hill, to invest in a townsite at the falls and urged that Hill extend his railroad through the new city.
Obstacle or Opportunity Marker (<i>view from Broadwater Overlook parking lot; marker in center</i>) image. Click for full size.
3. Obstacle or Opportunity Marker (view from Broadwater Overlook parking lot; marker in center)
In 1883 the city of Great Falls, Montana, had been founded. (Submitted on November 20, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. River’s Edge Trail map. Broadwater Overlook Park is near the south trailhead for the Great Falls River's Edge Trail. This is one of many historical markers to be found along the River's Edge Trail. (Submitted on November 20, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 26, 2018. This page originally submitted on November 20, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 23 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 20, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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