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Giddings in Lee County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

General Robert E. Lee / Colonel Robert E. Lee

County named for beloved Confederate General Robert E. Lee

 

—Colonel Robert E. Lee In Texas 1857-1861 —

 
General Robert E. Lee / Colonel Robert E. Lee Marker (<i>front & back</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
1. General Robert E. Lee / Colonel Robert E. Lee Marker (front & back)
Inscription.
(front)
County named for beloved Confederate General Robert E. Lee

Led army of Northern Virginia which included famed Hood's Texas Brigade. He said about them "I never ordered that brigade to hold a position that they did not hold it." "The enemy never sees the backs of my Texans." In the Battle of the Wilderness, the Texans, seeing Lee set to lead the charge and fearing for his safety, halted, shouting, "General Lee to the rear," until he complied. Lee once declined furloughs for the Texans for he needed their services. He considered them his best shock troops. About Lee's surrender a Texan said, "I'd rather have died than surrendered; but if Marse Bob thinks that is best... Marse Bob is bound to be right as usual."

(back)
Colonel Robert E Lee in Texas 1857-1861

Robert E. Lee spent 25 months on the Texas frontier, proving and seasoning grounds for great army leaders in the impending Civil War. With the 2nd U. S. Cavalry at Camp Cooper, he led a 1,600-mile scouting expedition into Indian country. He commanded the 2nd, first at San Antonio – leading the attempt to capture Mexican bandit Juan Cortina – next at Fort Mason. Lee learned how to adapt himself and his men to outdoor life and adverse conditions he later faced on battlefields.
General Robert E. Lee / Colonel Robert E. Lee Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
2. General Robert E. Lee / Colonel Robert E. Lee Marker (tall view)
Knowledge of the ways of his fellow officers who later held high ranks in both armies served him well in military crises. Lee also realized his strong love for his native Virginia and refused the offer of U.S. Army Commander-in-Chief, choosing to fight with his State.
 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 8164.)
 
Location. 30° 10.906′ N, 96° 56.245′ W. Marker is in Giddings, Texas, in Lee County. Marker is at the intersection of South Main Street (U.S. 77) and East Hempstead Street, on the right when traveling north on South Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is located near the sidewalk on the northwest corner of the Lee County Courthouse grounds. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 South Main Street, Giddings TX 78942, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lee County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Lee County (within shouting distance of this marker); Milton Garrett York, Sr. (within shouting distance of this marker); Fletcher Home (within shouting distance of this marker); First Presbyterian Church (about 300 feet
General Robert E. Lee (<i>front side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
3. General Robert E. Lee (front side)
away, measured in a direct line); James Goucher (approx. 3.7 miles away); Serbin (approx. 5.3 miles away); a different marker also named Serbin (approx. 5.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Giddings.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large, double-sided, polished pink granite slab. The marker is weathered and somewhat difficult to read
 
Also see . . .
1. Robert E. Lee - American Civil War.
On April 20, 1861, at the outbreak of the American Civil War, he resigned his commission and three days later was appointed by Governor John Letcher of Virginia to be commander in chief of the military and naval forces of the state. When Virginia’s troops were transferred to the Confederate service, he became, on May 14, 1861, a brigadier general, the highest rank then authorized. Soon after he was promoted to full general. (Submitted on December 27, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Colonel Robert E. Lee Resigned From The Army.
Lee opposed the Confederacy and denounced secession as “nothing but revolution” and a betrayal to the Founding Fathers. Despite this, he maintained his loyalty to Virginia. (Submitted on December 27, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Colonel Robert E. Lee (<i>back side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
4. Colonel Robert E. Lee (back side)
 

3. Robert E. Lee - Beloved General of the South.
Following the war Lee was almost tried as a traitor, but was only left with his civil rights suspended. Lee was offered the post of President of Washington University where he served until his death in 1870. The school was later renamed Washington and Lee. As a final note President Gerald Ford had Lee's citizenship restored. (Submitted on December 27, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Lee Enters The Civil War With The Confederecy.
Lee did not support secession, but he would not fight against his native state. He resigned his officer’s commission and became a major general of Virginia troops, commanding all military forces of the state. After Virginia officially joined the Confederacy and its governor transferred all the state’s troops to that body, Lee became a Confederate major general—for all of two days, after which the Confederate Congress made him their army’s third full general, ranking behind Samuel Cooper and Albert Sidney Johnston. (Submitted on December 27, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Notable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 
Lee County Courthouse (<i>view from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
5. Lee County Courthouse (view from marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 28, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 26, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 127 times since then and 71 times this year. Last updated on November 26, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 27, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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