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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Cookville in Titus County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Titus County

 
 
Titus County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2016
1. Titus County Marker
Inscription.
Formed from
Red River and Bowie counties
Created May 11, 1846
Organized July 13, 1846

Named in honor of

Andrew J. Titus
1814-1855

Pioneer of northwest Texas
Soldier in the Mexican War

Member of the Texas Legislature
County seat, Mt. Pleasant

 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 11184.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 33° 11.207′ N, 94° 49.569′ W. Marker is near Cookville, Texas, in Titus County. Marker is on U.S. 67 1˝ miles east of County Highway 4054, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located within a state roadside park on the south side of the highway. Marker is surrounded by a protective security fence. Marker is in this post office area: Cookville TX 75558, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Caddo Indian Communities in the Cypress Creek Drainage (approx. 5.2 miles away); Snow Hill Baptist Church (approx. 6.8 miles away); Snow Hill Cemetery (approx.
Titus County Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2016
2. Titus County Marker (tall view)
6.8 miles away); Dellwood Park (approx. 8.2 miles away); Titus County Confederate Monument (approx. 8˝ miles away); First Presbyterian Church of Mt. Pleasant (approx. 8˝ miles away); Titus County C.S.A. (approx. 8˝ miles away); Henry Clay Thruston (approx. 8.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Andrew Jackson Titus. He was active in developing the area in which he lived and is said to have laid out a road to connect with water transportation at Jefferson. He was a royal arch Mason and a Knight Templar and organized the A. J. Titus Lodge. Titus moved his family to Savannah, Texas, in the early 1840s, and he served as the community's first postmaster in 1846. He served in the Mexican War and later represented his district in the Fourth Legislature, 1851–52. Titus is said to have worked for the annexation of Texas to the United States; he spent much time in Austin and Washington. (Submitted on January 5, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Titus County History. During the early 1840s settlement of the area proceeded rapidly, and in 1846 the First Legislature of the state of Texas established Titus County, which
Titus County Marker (<i>wide view showing security fence surrounding marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2016
3. Titus County Marker (wide view showing security fence surrounding marker)
included all of the territory of present-day Morris and Franklin counties. The county was named for Andrew Jackson Titus, an early Red River County settler. Most white settlers in the county had come from other southern states, and they brought with them southern customs and institutions, including slavery. The number of blacks held as slaves in the county grew faster than the number of whites throughout the antebellum period. (Submitted on January 5, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWar, Mexican-American
 
Farrier Site Dedication Plaque (<i>located beside marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2016
4. Farrier Site Dedication Plaque (located beside marker)
This site was donated
for park purposes to the
State Highway Department
of Texas
by
W. G. Farrier
in memory of his parents
F. W. and Lura Hart Farrier
1935
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 7, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 5, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 29 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 5, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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