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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gainesville in Alachua County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bryan Hall

 
 
Bryan Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 28, 2011
1. Bryan Hall Marker
Inscription.  Nathan Philemon Bryan was born in Ft. Mason, Florida, in 1872. In 1893 he earned a bachelor’s degree from Emory College, followed in 1895 by a law degree from Washington and Lee University. That year he opened a law practice in Jacksonville, Florida. The Bryan family was active in civic and political affairs and close to Florida Governor Napoleon Bonaparte Broward. In 1905, Governor Broward appointed Nathan Bryan to the newly created Board of Control, overseeing Florida’s institutions of higher learning. The board unanimously elected Bryan as its first chair. During his four years in that post, he pressed successfully for the establishment of a law school at the University of Florida. From 1911 until 1917, Bryan served as U.S. senator from Florida. In 1920, he became a judge on the U.S. Circuit Court, which position he held until his death in Jacksonville, in 1935.

The Law College at the University of Florida first met in 1909, in Thomas Hall. Thirty-one students made up the initial class, meeting there or later in Language (now Anderson) Hall until 1914, when Bryan Hall was completed. Built by contractor J.L. Crouse of Madison, Florida,
Bryan Hall Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible "edge-on"; in front of door</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 26, 2011
2. Bryan Hall Marker (wide view; marker visible "edge-on"; in front of door)
at a cost of $24,000, Bryan Hall was designed by architect William A. Edwards, who was also responsible for the University’s comprehensive plan. This structure follows Edwards’ established Collegiate Gothic style, with brick exterior fabric and terra cotta adornments, but without parapets or a cornice. Instead, overhanging eaves, similar to those found on contemporary Florida bungalows, distinguished the building. In 1948, extensive renovations were made to accommodate an addition, completed in 1950, which resulted in the wing adjoining the north end of the original structure. Bryan Hall was dedicated on November 20, 1914, in honor of Nathan P. Bryan, and housed the College of Law until 1969. It is now part of the College of Business Administration.

This building is on the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Location. 29° 39.068′ N, 82° 20.421′ W. Marker is in Gainesville, Florida, in Alachua County. Marker can be reached from NE State Road 24 (U.S. 441) north of Union Road, on the right when traveling south. Marker is located in the courtyard directly in front of the subject building. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1384 Union Road, Gainesville FL 32611, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. University of Florida Historic Campus (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Walker Hall
Bryan Hall Sign (<i>located near marker; in front of the newer north wing</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 28, 2011
3. Bryan Hall Sign (located near marker; in front of the newer north wing)
(about 700 feet away); African Studies (approx. 0.2 miles away); Robert Marston Science Library (approx. 0.3 miles away); Florida Extension (approx. 0.3 miles away); Florida 4-H (approx. 0.4 miles away); IFAS (approx. 0.4 miles away); Alachua General Hospital (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gainesville.
 
Also see . . .
1. U.S. Congressional Biography: Nathan Philemon Bryan (1872 - 1935). (Submitted on January 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
2. Nathan Philemon Bryan. After his congressional service, Bryan declined the appointment as Governor General of the Philippine Islands by President Woodrow Wilson in 1917. Bryan returned to the practice of law and also became a trustee of Emory University. On April 23, 1920, Bryan was nominated by President Woodrow Wilson to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, to a seat vacated by Robert Lynn Batts. He was confirmed by the United States Senate and received commission the same day. He held this position until his death. (Submitted on January 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
Bryan Hall (<i>wide view facing west; newer north wing is to the right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 26, 2011
4. Bryan Hall (wide view facing west; newer north wing is to the right)

3. National Register of Historic Places Nomination (#79000653). Bryan Hall is historically significant to the University of Florida as the first "permanent" home of the College of Law, which is the second oldest law school in the state. Bryan Hall has a certain added significance as a point of experimental departure for the principal campus architect, William Edwards. Unlike his other University of Florida buildings, Bryan was designed to be an austere structure. Its bracketed eaves, typical of the bungalow residential style so popular in Florida at the time, provide a distinct contrast with Edwards’ other campus structures. (Submitted on January 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureEducationPolitics
 

More. Search the internet for Bryan Hall.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 22, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 66 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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