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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Water Power: Baltimore's Economic Engine

Jones Falls Trail and the Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

 
 
Water Power: Baltimore's Economic Engine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 10, 2011
1. Water Power: Baltimore's Economic Engine Marker
Inscription.  The best-known and least-appreciated fresh waterway in Baltimore, the Jones Falls River is an important tributary of the Chesapeake Watershed, and the largest of several waterways that empty into Baltimore Harbor. From the time of the first colonial settlements, the Jones Falls River has served Baltimore City as a transportation corridor, a power source for early industry, and a source of drinking water. In fact, the mills powered by the swift-flowing Jones Falls played a key role in making Baltimore an industrial giant in the 19th century. Sadly, much of the natural beauty of this Bay tributary has been obscured by road construction, including the elevated Jones Falls Expressway. One result of the many efforts now underway to restore the Jones Falls is the new Jones Falls Trail, a hiking and biking Trail that follows the river, passing historic mills and the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, and winding through the 745-acre Druid Hill Park. When completed, the Trail will extend 12 miles from the Inner Harbor to Mt. Washington Village.

Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse
For 133 years, the Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse and its beacon provided

Water Power: Baltimore's Economic Engine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 10, 2011
2. Water Power: Baltimore's Economic Engine Marker
Right side of the marker above where it was cut off.
a safe guide for sailors at the mouth of the Patapsco River, 12 miles downstream from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. The innovative design of screwpile lighthouses made them easier and faster to build because no underwater masonry foundation was needed. Instead, these lighthouses were suspended above the water by a system of cast-iron pilings with corkscrew-like bases, which were screwed into the Bay floor. First lit in 1856, the Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse is the oldest screwpile lighthouse in Maryland and was in active use until its relocation to Baltimore’s Inner Harbor in 1988.

Chesapeake Connection
With access to worldwide distribution via the Chesapeake Bay, by 1827 Baltimore was the nation’s largest exporter of flour, ground by dozens of mills along the Jones Falls. In addition, by 1840, textile mills in the Jones Falls valley produced 80% of the nation’s cotton duck, or sail cloth.
 
Location. 39° 17.106′ N, 76° 36.252′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is at the intersection of Eastern Avenue and East Falls Avenue on Eastern Avenue. Marker is on the Inner Harbor walkway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Essex MD 21221, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Christopher Columbus Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Baltimore Public Works Museum

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(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Baltimore Riot Trail (about 300 feet away); The Coast Guard Cutter Taney (about 600 feet away); Seven-Foot Knoll Lighthouse (about 600 feet away); Living Classrooms Foundation (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Baltimore Riot Trail (about 600 feet away); President Street Station (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on January 22, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 8, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 435 times since then and 55 times this year. Last updated on January 22, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 8, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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