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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Dawson-Bailey Spring Site

 
 
The Dawson-Bailey Spring Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, January 27, 2019
1. The Dawson-Bailey Spring Site Marker
Inscription.  This spring and the property on which it is located is rich with the recorded history of Arlington. Its first owner, Thomas Owsley, patented the land in 1696. by law, Owsley would have been required to build a house on the land within one year, or forfeit the right to the property. It is believed that the old stone house, now incorporated into the structure of the Dawson Terrace Recreation Center, is the house Owlsey built. If this is so, it is the oldest house in Arlington.

After passing through several owners, including George Mason, the spring and stone house were purchased by Thomas Dawson in 1859. The Dawsons enlarged their house on the east end, and named it Rio Vista. During the Civil War, a ring of forts was constructed around Washington to protect the Nation's Capital. Union troops began construction of Fort Bennett in 1861, just to the east of Rio Vista, the same year the Dawson's youngest daughter, Bessie Lola was born. Bessie Dawson married William Conway Bailey from New York. She continued to live at Rio Vista until her death in 1955.

According to Bessie Dawson Bailey, her father would bring black walnuts from
The Dawson-Bailey Spring Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, January 27, 2019
2. The Dawson-Bailey Spring Site Marker
the trees near his home to soldiers camped near this spring. Soldiers were cutting down many trees for firewood, and Mr. Dawson asked them to leave the tulip poplar tree which shaded the spring. This is the large tree which you see growing next to the spring today.

When Dr. Jacobs purchased the property in 1936, he found the spring enclosed in a rectangular brick structure with a rusting metal roof. He instructed the stonemasons building his castle house to use left-over stone to construct the hexagonal-shaped spring house you see today.
 
Location. 38° 54.005′ N, 77° 4.904′ W. Marker is in Arlington, Virginia, in Arlington County. Marker is on North Scott Street north of 21st Road North, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2121 North Scott Street, Arlington VA 22209, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Bay-Eva Castle Site (within shouting distance of this marker); The Dawson-Bailey House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Bennett (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort C.F. Smith (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Corcoran (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Strong (approx. half a mile away);
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a different marker also named Fort C.F. Smith (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Fort C.F. Smith (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Arlington.
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & SettlersWar, US CivilWomen
 

More. Search the internet for The Dawson-Bailey Spring Site.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 18, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 63 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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