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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Bay-Eva Castle Site

 
 
The Bay-Eva Castle Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, January 27, 2019
1. The Bay-Eva Castle Site Marker
Inscription.  This sign marks the spot where Dr. Bay Jacobs and his wife Eva built their home, a beautiful stone castle. Dr. Jacobs was a prominent physician who served on the staff of both Georgetown and Arlington Hospitals. The location of this property, halfway between the two, perfectly suited his needs. He made many advances in women's medicine during his distinguished career. His wife, Eva Harris Jacobs served as President of the Business and Professional Women's Club of Arlington. She also wrote a historical novel entitled Feather on the Dart.

According to Mr. Frank Segretti, one of five stone masons who worked on the project, Mrs. Jacobs sat on a tree stump in the rain, and while sheltered by her umbrella, sketched the design for her home. It took three months to cover the exterior of the three story house with stone. The name "Bay-Eva" was chiseled into the stone by the front door, which opened to look out toward the Potomac. The castle was solidly constructed with a slate roof, copper gutters, oak flooring and stone walls which were 18" thick in places. The central turret contained a spiral staircase with wrought iron railing.
The Bay-Eva Castle Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, January 27, 2019
2. The Bay-Eva Castle Site Marker
At the base of the stairs was a tiled fish pond; at the top of the stairs the turret contained an additional fourth floor room which Mrs. Jacobs used as a studio. Dr. and Mrs. Jacobs filled their home with Jacobian and French antiques. Dr. Jacobs died in 1899. He deeded this land and the castle to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

The property was then owned by a series of developers, and in 1995 was proffered to the County and its citizens by Eakin-Youngentob Associates, Inc. for use as park land.

Many before us have recognized the beauty and enjoyed the use of this land. Archaeological evidence suggests that Native Americans travelled and lived along the Potomac as far back as 10,000 B.C. The first white man to lay claim to the land surrounding this site was Thomas Owsley, in 1696; in 1767, the land was regranted to George Mason; Mason's grandson John lost the property to the Bank of the United States in 1833. Twenty-six years later Thomas B. Dawson purchased 81 acres including this site, for $2,378.00. Thomas' daughter, Bessie Dawson Bailey, sold part of that land, the "Spring Lot," to Dr. J. Bay Jacobs in 1936.
 
Location. 38° 54.047′ N, 77° 4.891′ W. Marker is in Arlington, Virginia, in Arlington County. Marker can be reached from North Scott Street
Bayeva Castle remnant nearby image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, January 27, 2019
3. Bayeva Castle remnant nearby
north of 21st Road North, on the right when traveling north. Marker is accessible from the walking trail at the north end of Scott Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2207 North Rolfe Street, Arlington VA 22209, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Dawson-Bailey Spring Site (within shouting distance of this marker); The Dawson-Bailey House (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Bennett (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort C.F. Smith (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Corcoran (approx. 0.4 miles away); For God And Country (approx. half a mile away in District of Columbia); a different marker also named Fort C.F. Smith (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Fort C.F. Smith (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Arlington.
 
Categories. ArchitectureArts, Letters, MusicScience & MedicineWomen
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on January 29, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 114 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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