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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

America's Response Monument

“De Oppresso Liber”

 

—(Liberate The Oppressed) —

 
America's Response Monument image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, February 5, 2019
1. America's Response Monument
Inscription.
Within hours of the cowardly attacks of September 11, 2001, America’s Special Operations Forces were called to action, formulating an unconventional warfare response to the acts of terror inflicted on our country. Not since the patriots’ actions of Concord and Lexington in our Revolution has first priority been given to such an unconventional approach. The force’s choice, eventually known as Task Force Dagger, was a multiservice, inter-agency task force built primarily around the Green Berets of the 5th Special Forces Group. Key to the Task Force’s success was a partnership formed between Army Special Operations, The Central Intelligence Agency, Air Force Special Operations and other inter-agency elements. Task Force Dagger was an unprecedented combination of our nation’s finest uniformed and civilian professionals brought together to accomplish their designed mission: destroy the Taliban regime and deny Afghanistan as a sanctuary for Al Qaeda. On the night of October 19, 2001, braving severe weather conditions and a ruthless enemy, the “A” teams of the 5th Special Forces Group began infiltrating throughout Afghanistan. Helicopter infiltration and fire support was provided by the world’s finest helicopter aviators, the “Nightstalkers” of the Army’s 160th Special Operation Aviation Regiment. Operating together
America's Response Monument Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 5, 2016
2. America's Response Monument Memorial
with their CIA counterparts and Air Force Combat Controllers, the teams made contact with the various ethnic indigenous resistance forces still holding out against the Taliban regime. Collectively, these integrated “A” Teams fought heroically under incredible dangerous and austere conditions alongside their Afghan counterparts and accomplished what so many said could not be done. Overthrowing the Taliban in that most dangerous of countries, Afghanistan, America’s Response Monument, “De Oppresso Liber”, features a Special Forces soldier representative of the many operational detachments “A” who operated across Afghanistan. Some of these A-Teams uniquely fought mounted on horseback alongside their Uzbek counterparts, successfully blending both ancient and 21st Century state of the art methods of warfare against our enemies. These operators, informally referred to as “Horse Soldiers” or “Afghan Mounted Rifles,” were the first Americans to fight on horseback in over 50 years. This image was selected because it typifies the courage, adaptability and resourcefulness that are hallmarks of America’s Special Operations community. The steel girder protruding from beneath the rocks is an actual piece of the World Trade Center towers and as such is considered a national treasure. It symbolizes the connection between the events of
"The Horse Soldier" image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 5, 2016
3. "The Horse Soldier"
9/11 and the actions of the Special Operations heroes this monument honors. You are welcome and encouraged to touch it. This monument is intended to honor the incredible courage, initiative and resourcefulness of all members of all branches of the Armed Forces who went and fought in the Battle of 9/11. It recognizes all the men of the Special Forces, all the great men and women of our joint Special Operations Forces, the intrepid officers of the central Intelligence Agency and the entire inter-agency teams whose dedication, courage and commitment to the people of the United States of America were called upon in those terrible early days following the attacks of 9/11 to bring justice to those who would attack us. This monument serves as a most grateful recognition by the American people of their extraordinary service and sacrifice.
Strength And Honor
 
Location. 40° 42.635′ N, 74° 0.852′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker can be reached from Liberty Street near West Street. Touch for map. The monument is in the elevated Liberty Park, alongside the 9/11 memorial site. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10014, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Grosse Kugelkaryatide (Great Spherical Caryatid), 1971 (within shouting distance of this marker);
The piece of 9/11 steel image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 5, 2016
4. The piece of 9/11 steel
Despite the inscription's invitation to touch it, the surrounding fence makes it impossible.
The West Street Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Anne Frank Tree (about 400 feet away); James Joyce Pub Award (about 800 feet away); Berlin Wall segment (approx. 0.2 miles away); American Stock Exchange (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named American Stock Exchange (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Reverend Dr. Robert Ray Parks (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Categories. War, Afghanistan
 
Roll Credits image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, February 5, 2019
5. Roll Credits
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 12, 2019. This page originally submitted on February 9, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 32 times since then. Last updated on February 11, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 9, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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