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Bandera in Bandera County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Bandera, “Cowboy Capital of the World”

 
 
Bandera, "Cowboy Capital of the World" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 17, 2019
1. Bandera, "Cowboy Capital of the World" Marker
Inscription.  The tradition of the Texas cowboy originated from northern Mexico with the vaqueros, individuals mounted on horseback who herded livestock, mainly cattle, through the open prairie. These men became legends in Bandera County. The City of Bandera became known as a cowboy town for recreation and obtaining supplies. Boys learned how to ride horses and drive cattle at a young age to earn wages on the ranches. The Western Cattle Trail extended from Mexico through Texas and up to the Canadian border and from 1874 to 1894, it is estimated that thirty thousand cowboys drove seven to ten million longhorns and one million horses through the trail using Bandera as a staging area.

Local rodeos began in the 1920s when cowboys who worked the ranches started exhibiting their skills during roundups and on cattle drives. Bandera had its first rodeo in 1924 at Mansfield Park, where rodeos have continued through the years. The Buck and the Bruce ranches took in summer guests holding rodeos as entertainment. Others that followed were the Dixie Dude, Bennie's U-Bar, and the Twin Elm ranches. Bandera cowboys became famous by earning world champion titles
Bandera, "Cowboy Capital of the World" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 17, 2019
2. Bandera, "Cowboy Capital of the World" Marker
and being inducted into the National Cowboy Hall of Fame. In 1938, Toots Mansfield was Bandera's first world champion in calf roping, earning this title on six additional occasions. He later became the first president of the National Rodeo Cowboy Association which was organized in 1945. In 1948, a San Antonio newspaper referenced Bandera as the "Cowboy Capital of the World." Since then, this title has been mentioned in numerous newspapers and magazines throughout the world.
 
Erected 2013 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17596.)
 
Location. 29° 43.545′ N, 99° 4.352′ W. Marker is in Bandera, Texas, in Bandera County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (State Highway 173/16) and Hackberry Street, on the right when traveling south on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in the Western Trail Heritage Park. Marker is in this post office area: Bandera TX 78003, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Great Western Cattle Trail (here, next to this marker); Bandera, Texas USA (here, next to this marker); Camp Montel C.S.A. / Texas Civil War Frontier Defense (within shouting distance of this marker); Bandera County Courthouse (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mormon Settlers in Bandera County (about 300 feet away); Old Texas Ranger Trail (about 400 feet away); Captain Jack Phillips (about 400 feet away); Bandera Historic Town Center (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bandera.
 
Also see . . .  Bandera, TX - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on February 26, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
More. Search the internet for Bandera, "Cowboy Capital of the World".
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 27, 2019. This page originally submitted on February 26, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 41 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 26, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.
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