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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wakefield in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Suburban Style

Top of the Town

 

—Tenleytown Heritage Trail —

 
Suburban Style Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 3, 2015
1. Suburban Style Marker
Inscription.  Until 1890 Tenleytown was a rural crossroads. Then the electric streetcar arrived, followed by the Permanent Highway Plan. Real estate men promoted new houses at the top of the town: city conveniences, country charm, and great views, with a 25-minute streetcar ride to downtown.

Developers Ernest M. Pease and Colorado Senator Thomas M. Patterson snapped up the promising high ground here between the Wisconsin Avenue and Connecticut Avenue streetcar lines. In 1904 they promoted their subdivision, “Colorado Heights,” to middle-income white workers, promising that homes would cost not less than $2,500. “Never again,” predicted the Washington Post “ will land anywhere near Connecticut Avenue be sold so cheaply as this.”

Despite Tenleytown’s modern amenities – police and fire protection, electric lights, water and sewers – growth dragged until after World War I (1914-1918). Then the Warren brothers bought many of Senator Patterson’s lots. They built three blocks of battleship gray, two-bedroom bungalows, many with front porches or sleeping porches. A walk around these blocks
Suburban Style Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 3, 2015
2. Suburban Style Marker
is a step back into the 1920s. Note the striking contrast with the upright brick Colonials that came into vogue in the 1940s.

In Tenleytown the Permanent Highway Plan took its cues from real estate developers, who had laid a grid over the old picturesque, curving streets. Years of changes to the area have erased portions of Grant Road and other country lanes, and the plan renamed others. The introduction of Nebraska Avenue (1930s) and Brandywine Street (1950s) led to the demolition of the old Nebraska Market, once situated behind you at Brandywine Street and Grant Road.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 3.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tenleytown Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 56.987′ N, 77° 4.481′ W. Marker is in Wakefield, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Brandywine Street Northwest and 38th Street Northwest, on the left when traveling east on Brandywine Street Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20016, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Schools (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Three R's (about 400 feet away); Fort Reno (about 400 feet away); a different marker also
Tenleytown: A Seven Hilled Citadel of Health image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress, 1903
3. Tenleytown: A Seven Hilled Citadel of Health
An Effusive Washington Times write-up promoted Tenleytown, 1903.

“The spelling ‘Tenallytown,’ and various similar forms are used, but the best authority is in favor of ‘Tenleytown’ as this was the spelling of the original name, and the abbreviation to merely ‘Tenley’ is also advised by the Postoffice Department, though it is worthy of note that In the old village graveyard on the headstone of one Joseph Conrad born in Wurtemburg 1798 and dying here in 1864, the spelling Tenleytown is used.”
named Fort Reno (about 800 feet away); Reservoir/Reno City (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Reno (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Reno (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Civil War Defenses of Washington (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wakefield.
 
Categories. Man-Made Features
 
Donna Burrows (Rose) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 3, 2015
4. Donna Burrows (Rose)
Donna Burrows whose family goes back to Tenleytown's beginnings, on her sled in front of Gorman's Store, Grant Road at Brandywine Street, 1937.
Close-up of photo on marker
Nebraska Market image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 3, 2015
5. Nebraska Market
[Gorman's] Store renamed Nebraska Market two decades later (1957)
Close-up of photo on marker
Senator Thomas Patterson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 3, 2015
6. Senator Thomas Patterson
An early Tenleytown speculator
Close-up of photo on marker
The Permanent Highway Plan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 3, 2015
7. The Permanent Highway Plan
The Permanent Highway Plan remade the neighborhood, changing street names and locations, and adding new streets, as seen on this 1908 map.
Close-up of map on marker
Revels 1991 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 3, 2015
8. Revels 1991
Young performers of the Washington Revels dance around the Maypole on Brandywine Street, 1991.
Close-up of photo on marker
Snow 1947 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 3, 2015
9. Snow 1947
A family walks east on snowy Chesapeake Street in 1947. Houses on the left would be raised for Fort Reno Park.
Close-up of photo on marker
High Street & Tenallytown Road image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 3, 2015
10. High Street & Tenallytown Road
The electric streetcar of the 1890s that made modern Tenleytown possible.
Close-up of photo on reverse of marker
 
More. Search the internet for Suburban Style.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 20, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 9, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 391 times since then and 15 times this year. Last updated on March 8, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on May 9, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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