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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Kearneysville in Berkeley County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Stone House Mansion

West Virginia 9

 

Charles Town to Martinsburg

 
Stone House Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 15, 2019
1. Stone House Mansion Marker
Inscription.  Stone House Mansion, predominantly Georgian in style, was constructed in 1757, and is one of the oldest stone structures in Berkeley County. The property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places for its association with the Hite vs. Fairfax lawsuit, which addressed the question of whether the American colonial government or English lords and government had the authority to grant land.

Specifically, Host Hite obtained thousands of acres of land in this region in 1731 from a land grant obtained by the van Metre brothers from Virginia Governor Gooch. The English Lord Fairfax claimed ownership of this land through English land grants. Consequently, the Virginia General Assembly passed an act stating that Lord Fairfax should honor all former land grants by the Colony, which upheld the authority of the colonies and eventually helped to precipitate the Revolutionary War. The Stone House Mansion was mentioned in the suit, which spanned several decades and was not settled until after the Revolution, by which time both Hite and Lord Fairfax had died. IT was settled, however, in Hite's favor, likely to prevent undermining the new
Stone House Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 15, 2019
2. Stone House Mansion Marker
government.

The house is also significant for its association with its many owners. Among them were John Strode, who built the mansion and lived there during the time of the Hite/Fairfax case. Adam Stephen, founder of Martinsburg, leased the property and later purchased it in 1789. Henry St. George Tucker (for whom Tucker County, West Virginia is named) owned the farm in the early 1800s. Tucker served as a cavalry captain during the War of 1812 and later became a prominent, published, U.S. congressman who also taught law in Winchester.

Between 1857 and 1942, the Stone House Mansion was occupied by members of the James M. Van Metre family, who descended from one of the county's earliest settlers. James Van Metre prospered as a farmer (eventually controlling 1,800 acres) and grocery store owner in Martinsburg. His son, Isaac, continued his father's lucrative farming business, raising sheep and providing homes for troubled and/or troubled orphans.
 
Erected by West Virginia Department of Transportation, Division of Highways.
 
Location. 39° 23.943′ N, 77° 55.274′ W. Marker is near Kearneysville, West Virginia, in Berkeley County. Marker is on Route 9 Bike Path south of Short Road (County Route 9/19), on the right when traveling north.
The Stone House Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 15, 2019
3. The Stone House Mansion
Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Kearneysville WV 25430, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Veterans Administration Center (approx. one mile away); "Travelers' Rest" (approx. 2.1 miles away); John C. Heinz House (approx. 2.4 miles away); “The Bower” (approx. 3 miles away); Van Metre Ford Bridge (approx. 3.2 miles away); "Prato Rio" (approx. 3.7 miles away); Pack Horse Road (approx. 3.9 miles away); The Greenback Raid (approx. 3.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kearneysville.
 
Categories. AgricultureColonial EraWar of 1812War, US Revolutionary
 

More. Search the internet for Stone House Mansion.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 18, 2019. This page originally submitted on April 18, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 18, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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