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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Barry in Pike County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Site of New Philadelphia

September 16, 1836 - 1885

 
 
Site of New Philadelphia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Emily Pursley, March 24, 2019
1. Site of New Philadelphia Marker
Inscription.  The town consisted of 144 lots laid out by a black man FREE FRANK MCWORTER. In 1819 he bought his freedom from slavery, and eventually freedom for 16 family members for $14,000. He was the first settler (1829) in Hadley Township. Free Frank was born in 1777 in South Carolina and died September 12, 1854. He is buried in the New Philadelphia cemetery mile southeast of this sign.
 
Location. 39° 41.88′ N, 90° 57.686′ W. Marker is near Barry, Illinois, in Pike County. Marker is on Township Road 2000N 2 miles east of Township Road 2000N (Illinois Highway 106), on the right when traveling east. When on Highway 106, turn east on the Baylis blacktop. There is a small brown New Philadelphia sign above the green Baylis sign. When in Barry, travel east out of town on Pratt Street. This turns into Township Rd 2000N and will take you straight to the site. When on I-72, take Exit 20 and enter Barry then follow the directions as aforementioned. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Barry IL 62312, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. New Philadelphia Townsite (here, next to this marker); First Baptist Church
Site of New Philadelphia image. Click for full size.
By Emily Pursley, March 24, 2019
2. Site of New Philadelphia
(approx. 4.1 miles away); M60 Tank (approx. 4.2 miles away); Little Red Brick (approx. 6.1 miles away); Robert Earl Hughes (approx. 8 miles away); William Grimshaw House (approx. 9.9 miles away); Reuben Scanland House (approx. 10.2 miles away); The Pike County Poet (approx. 10.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Barry.
 
More about this marker. This sign is under the kiosk/pavilion. There are several more signs there for you read about the history of New Philadelphia. There are also guideposts along where the town streets used to be where you can use the New Philadelphia AR app (available free in the appstore) to see what daily life would have looked like in the town. Internet is available. For more information on the site or app, you can stop by the Barry Public Library and Museum.
 
Regarding Site of New Philadelphia. The buildings at the site today are not original to the site but are similar to what was likely there. The cemetery is on private property so do not try to go find it. The house on the southeast end of the site is also private. Please stay near where the guideposts are to avoid trespassing.
 
Categories. African AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Free Frank McWorter image. Click for full size.
By Emily Pursley, circa 2019
3. Free Frank McWorter
A bust of the founder of New Philadelphia.
Kiosk/Pavilion at New Philadelphia image. Click for full size.
By Emily Pursley, March 24, 2019
4. Kiosk/Pavilion at New Philadelphia
This is what you will see from the road when you arrive. There are signs for your reading enjoyment and historic enlightenment in here. There is also a guest sign-in and a mailbox that the New Philadelphia Association would appreciate you use so we can see that you visited and keep in touch with you (if you'd like - it's optional, of course).
 

More. Search the internet for Site of New Philadelphia.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 5, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 30, 2019, by Emily Pursley of Pittsfield, Illinois. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Last updated on June 4, 2019, by Emily Pursley of Pittsfield, Illinois. Photos:   1. submitted on June 1, 2019, by Emily Pursley of Pittsfield, Illinois.   2, 3, 4. submitted on May 30, 2019, by Emily Pursley of Pittsfield, Illinois. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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