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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Harpers Ferry in Jefferson County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Prize of War

 
 
Prize of War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
1. Prize of War Marker
Inscription. Harpers Ferry was much sought by North and South, 1861-1865. Its garrison of 12,000 Union troops was captured by an army of Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson, Sept. 15, 1862, on way to join Lee at Antietam. The Catholic Church was used as Federal hospital.
 
Location. 39° 19.528′ N, 77° 44.305′ W. Marker is in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, in Jefferson County. Marker is at the intersection of Washington Street (Business U.S. 340) and Gilmore Street, on the right when traveling west on Washington Street. Touch for map. Located across the street from the Harpers Ferry Bandstand. Marker is in this post office area: Harpers Ferry WV 25425, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Harpers Ferry Bandstand (a few steps from this marker); Morrell House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Harpers Ferry / John Brown’s Fort (about 600 feet away); The Appalachian Trail and Benton MacKaye (about 600 feet away); The Niagara Movement (about 700 feet away); Virginia Lodge No. 1 (about 700 feet away); Storer College Veterans Memorial Gate (about 700 feet away); Camp Hill (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Harpers Ferry.
 
Also see . . .
1. The 1862 Battle of Harpers Ferry
Prize of War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
2. Prize of War Marker
. (Submitted on October 13, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. History of St. Peter's Catholic Church in Harpers Ferry. (Submitted on October 13, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
St. Peter's Catholic Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 12, 2007
3. St. Peter's Catholic Church
Used as hospital during the war, St. Peter's survived several bombardments, while the nearby St. Johns Episcopal Church did not. Legend says the British Union Jack was flown from St. Peter's during the bombardment to dissuade Confederate gunners from firing in the church's direction.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 13, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,128 times since then and 57 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 13, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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