Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anacostia in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Barry Farm - Hillsdale

Bounded by St. Elizabeths Hospital, Alabama Avenue and Morris Road, SE, and the Anacostia River

 

—African American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC —

 
Barry Farm - Hillsdale Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 3, 2009
1. Barry Farm - Hillsdale Marker
Inscription.
In 1867 the U.S. Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands (Freedmen’s Bureau) purchased 375 acres from white farmers David and Julia Barry to resettle formerly enslaved African Americans. By 1870 more than 500 families had purchased lots and built homes at Barry Farm, later renamed Hillsdale.

During World War II, the U.S. Government constructed “Barry Farms” housing on Hillsdale’s eastern edge to relieve overcrowding across the Anacostia [River]. Soon, Southwest [DC] urban renewal brought more families, spurring the over building of multi-family housing. These projects and the Suitland Parkway and Anacostia Freeway greatly changed the neighborhood. Most remaining historic houses date to around 1900; a few older ones remain along Elvans Road.

[Photo caption:]
A home on Sheridan Road in Barry Farm, early 1900s.
Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC - Funded by the DC Historic Preservation Office.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Washington, DC African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 51.73′ N, 76° 59.693′ W. Marker is in Anacostia, District
Barry Farm - Hillsdale Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 3, 2009
2. Barry Farm - Hillsdale Marker
- view from across Howard Road - marker visible behind railing, center left.
of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Howard Road, SE, west of Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is off the sidewalk at the northeast corner of DC Metro's Anacostia subway/bus station, on Howard Road between Firth Sterling and MLK,Jr. Avenues, SE. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Navy Town (within shouting distance of this marker); Faith and Action (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Nichols Avenue Elementary School/Old Birney School Site (about 400 feet away); Birney School (about 500 feet away); A Museum for the Community (about 700 feet away); Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Crossing Lines (approx. ¼ mile away); Hillsdale (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anacostia.
 
Also see . . .  Suitland Parkway. (Submitted on July 29, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Reconstruction Era; Uniontown; Ward 8; housing segregation; urban decay; Martha Jackson-Jarvis.
 
Categories. African AmericansPoliticsSettlements & Settlers
 
The Anacostia Metro Station image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 3, 2009
3. The Anacostia Metro Station
- the Barry Farm-Hillsdale Marker is at its northeastern end, past the crosswalk, left middle. Note the acclaimed glass mosaic frieze by Martha Jackson-Jarvis, "River Spirits of the Anacostia" decorating the facility's roof-line, upper right.
View toward downtown Washington from the Suitland Parkway-MLK Ave overpass, southeast of the marker. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 7, 2009
4. View toward downtown Washington from the Suitland Parkway-MLK Ave overpass, southeast of the marker.
Changes wrought by construction of the parkway (begun in 1944) and subsequent high density housing projects for the poor are said to mark the start of Barry Farm-Hillsdales's decline from its beginnings as a thriving, semi-rural Afro-American community.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 29, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,600 times since then and 99 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 29, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement