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Unison in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle of Unison

“Truly frightful”

 
 
Battle of Unison Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2011
1. Battle of Unison Marker
Inscription. (Preface):
After the Battle of Antietam in September 1862, Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia escaped to Virginia. President Abraham Lincoln repeatedly urged Union Gen. George B. McClellan to pursue and attack. Following a plan that Lincoln devised to trap Lee's army in the Shenandoah Valley, McClellan finally got his Army of the Potomac moving. On November 1, Union cavalry Gen. Alfred Pleasonton began leading the advance from Philomont toward Upperville. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's cavalry delayed him for three days. On November 5, learning that Lee's army had evaded the trap and reached Culpeper County, Lincoln ordered McClellan relieved of command.

On Sunday morning, November 2, 1862, the peaceful service here at Unison United Methodist Church was suddenly disrupted. First came the faint sounds of a Union band playing "Listen to the Mockingbird" and then the sounds of combat. Union Gen. Alfred Pleasonton with 2,500 cavalry and infantry and 12 cannons was marching down Unison Road from Philomont. Residents cowered as the fight swirled through the village.

Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart was waiting. He had posted most of his 900 cavalrymen near the crossroads 200 yards to your right. His six cannons, under Maj. John Pelham, fired from the field across the road. Artillery from both sides bombarded the village,
Battle of Unison, November 2, 1862 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2011
2. Battle of Unison, November 2, 1862
and armed men clashed in the streets. Col. Heros von Borke, Stuart's aide, described the scene as "furious flames... dense volumes of smoke ... terror and confusion .. truly frightful." After an hour, Stuart withdrew, reestablished his line 1,000 yards to your left, and delayed Pleasonton's advance for two more hours. He repeated this tactic until dark. As the fight moved south, the church became a Union hospital. Confederates were treated in the Keene house across the road.
 
Erected 2011 by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 2.062′ N, 77° 47.601′ W. Marker is in Unison, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker is on Unison Road (County Route 630), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located in front of the Unison Methodist Church. Marker is in this post office area: Middleburg VA 20117, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. History of St. Louis (approx. 1.7 miles away); Bushrod Lynn (approx. 2.3 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Unison (approx. 3.2 miles away); Round Oak Rag Apple Elevation
Union Soldier Graffiti image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2011
3. Union Soldier Graffiti
A section of graffiti from the Unison United Methodist Church.
(approx. 3.2 miles away); White Pump Drovers Tavern (approx. 3.3 miles away); Hibbs Bridge (approx. 3.8 miles away); Attack at Goose Creek Bridge (approx. 3.9 miles away); Mosby’s Rangers (approx. 4.1 miles away).
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Portraits of Gens. Stuart and Pleasonton image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2011
4. Portraits of Gens. Stuart and Pleasonton
Pleasonton's Cavalry Deployed as Skirmishers image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2011
5. Pleasonton's Cavalry Deployed as Skirmishers
Battle of Unison Marker and Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2011
6. Battle of Unison Marker and Church
Unison United Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2011
7. Unison United Methodist Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 16, 2011, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 824 times since then and 73 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on May 16, 2011, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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