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Perryville in Boyle County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Assault on Parsons’ Ridge

Perryville

 

—The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862 —

 
Assault on Parsons’ Ridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, August 18, 2011
1. Assault on Parsons’ Ridge Marker
Inscription. Maney’s Confederates immediately discovered the lethal danger of attacking the eight Union cannon on top of the ridge in front of you. The Confederates sought cover behind a split-rail fence, but the Union artillery shattered the rails, killing and wounding scores of soldiers. The Confederate attack slowed and then stopped.

With bullets smashing against the remaining wooden rails, the Confederates traded gunfire with Union infantry. As casualties mounted, the Southern officers knew their men had to take the hill. If they attempted a retreat, they would be cut apart by the Union artillery. Urging their men forward, the officers crossed the fence to lead a renewed charge.

The intensity of the Union defense atop this steep slope stopped the Confederates again, only halfway to their objective. Lying down to escape the deadly fire, Maney’s men desperately loaded and fired their one-shot muskets as best they could.

[As] soon as the fence was reached, in full view of the battery, such a storm of shell, grape, canister, and Minie balls was turned loose upon us as no troops scarcely ever before encountered. Large boughs were torn from the trees; the trees themselves shattered as if by lightning, and the ground plowed in deep furrows.
Confederate Lieutenant Colonel William Frierson
27th Tennessee
Assault on Parsons’ Ridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, August 18, 2011
2. Assault on Parsons’ Ridge Marker
Infantry

[We] come to a high fence at the edge of the woods, at which time it seemed impossible for humanity to go farther, such was the havoc and destruction that had taken place in [our] ranks.
Confederate Colonel George C. Porter
6th Tennessee Infantry
 
Location. 37° 40.63′ N, 84° 58.286′ W. Marker is in Perryville, Kentucky, in Boyle County. Marker can be reached from Park Road west of Battlefield Road (Kentucky Route 1920). Touch for map. Located in Perryville Battlefield State Historic Site. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1825 Battlefield Road, Perryville KY 40468, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Defense of Parsons’ Ridge (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Defense of Parsons’ Ridge (about 400 feet away); Turner's Battery (about 600 feet away); Maney's Attack (about 600 feet away); The Cornfield (about 700 feet away); Union Monument (about 700 feet away); On this Spot Brig. Gen. James S. Jackson Fell (about 700 feet away); Army of the Ohio (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Perryville.
 
More about this marker. On the upper right is a photograph with the caption, “From the hill in front of you
Assault on Parsons’ Ridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 31, 2012
3. Assault on Parsons’ Ridge Marker
Marker in distance (yellow arrow). Parson's Ridge in distance.
a battery of eight cannon commanded by Union Lieutenant Charles Parsons (above) rained shells upon the advancing Confederate brigade.” United States Military History Institute, Carlisle, Pennsylvania
 
Also see . . .
1. Perryville Battlefield State Historic Site. Kentucky Department of Parks (Submitted on August 25, 2011.) 

2. Perryville. Civil War Trust (Submitted on August 25, 2011.) 

3. Perryville. CWSAC Battle Summary (Submitted on August 25, 2011.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 25, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 521 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 25, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   3. submitted on September 14, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.
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