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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps

 
 
Greene's Division Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Greene's Division Tablet
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps.

Brig. Gen. George Greene, Commanding.
(September 17, 1862.)

Greene's Division having turned the enemy's right in the East Woods advanced against the Confederate infantry north and east of this point, which retired to the woods west of the Hagerstown Pike. Greene pressed forward in pursuit through the East Woods and across Mumma's Fields to the ridge a few yards east of this point, where he halted to replenish ammunition. With the assistance of Monroe's Tompkins' and Owen's Rhode Island, Knapp's Pennsylvania and Edgell's New Hampshire Batteries, he repulsed several assaults of the enemy. About 10:30 a.m., he crossed this road and advanced into the woods beyond the Dunkard Church which he held until noon, when he was compelled to retire to the East Woods, where he formed line in support of the Sixth Army Corps.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 51.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.524′ N, 77° 44.781′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Dunker
Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker
Church Road / Old Hagerstown Pike and Smoketown Road, on the right when traveling north on Dunker Church Road / Old Hagerstown Pike. Touch for map. Located at stop one of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield, across the road from the Dunker Church in a tablet cluster. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Twelfth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); Reserve Artillery, Longstreet's Command (here, next to this marker); Second Army Corps (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Twelfth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); 5th, 7th and 66th Ohio Infantry Monument (here, next to this marker); Dunkard Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Destroy the Rebel Army (within shouting distance of this marker); Beacon of Peace (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 17, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 2nd Division, XII Corps. Greene was an 1823 graduate of West Point. After serving for about thirteen years he resigned and worked as a civilian engineer. After volunteering for service with the 60th New York Infantry in
Tablet Cluster Opposite the Dunker Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Tablet Cluster Opposite the Dunker Church
Five numbered tablets, with one continuation tablet, stand in front of the Dunker Church on the east side of the old Pike. These are, from furthest from the camera, Tyndale's Brigade (53), Second Army Corps (116), continuation tablet for 116, Goodrich's Brigade (114), Greene's Division (51), and Reserve Artillery of Longstreet's Command (306).
January 1862, he rapidly was promoted to Brigadier General and to Division command. (Submitted on March 17, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. George S. Greene. George Sears Greene (May 6, 1801 – January 28, 1899) was a civil engineer and a Union general during the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 15, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker<br>Second From the Right image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker
Second From the Right
Brig. General George S. Greene (1801-1899) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Brig. General George S. Greene (1801-1899)
Greene led a crushing attack against the Confederates near the Dunker Church, achieving the farthest penetration of Maj. Gen. Stonewall Jackson's lines than any Union unit. Under immense pressure, Greene held his small division in advance of the rest of the army for four hours, but eventually withdrew after suffering heavy losses.
Greene's Objective image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. Greene's Objective
For about an hour and a half Greene's Division maintained a tenuous hold on the area around the Dunker Church, and the south end of the West Woods. Running low on ammunition and receiving no reinforcements, Greene fell back to the East Woods where the division had started. Greene's command was perhaps the most successful Division on the Federal side of the field.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 29, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 17, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 899 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 17, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 15, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 15, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on March 17, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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