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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wheeling in Ohio County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Henry

“The Bloody Year of the Three Sevens”

 

—Wheeling National Heritage Area —

 
Fort Henry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 30, 2013
1. Fort Henry Marker
Inscription. Planned by General George Rogers Clarke and constructed in 1774 by Wheeling settlers, Fort Henry withstood a number of sieges. The first major battle was during the Revolutionary War in September 1777 when the British led 300 Wyandot, Mingo, and Shawnee Indians against the settlement. Originally called Fort Fincastle, the fort was later named Fort Henry in honor of the famous patriot Patrick Henry. The fort was located on the hill in what is now the 1000 block of Main Street.

The Wheeling National Heritage Area preserves and celebrates the city's dramatic setting, resources, and history, including its role as the birthplace of the state of West Virginia during the Civil War.

A National Heritage Area is a part of our county's landscape that has been recognized by the United States Congress for its unique contribution to the American Experience.
 
Location. 40° 4.159′ N, 80° 43.499′ W. Marker is in Wheeling, West Virginia, in Ohio County. Marker is on Wheeling Heritage Trail. Touch for map. Marker is along the Wheeling Heritage Trail behind 1033 Main Street. Marker is in this post office area: Wheeling WV 26003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Fort Henry (within shouting distance of
Fort Henry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 30, 2013
2. Fort Henry Marker
this marker); Wheeling Suspension Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Pennsylvania Depot (within shouting distance of this marker); In Memoriam (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Siege of Fort Henry (about 300 feet away); Wheeling Suspension Bridge - 1849 (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Wheeling Suspension Bridge (about 400 feet away); Congressional Medal of Honor (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wheeling.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
McColloch's Leap image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 30, 2013
3. McColloch's Leap
❶ In 1777, Major Samuel McColloch narrowly escaped an Indian assault by riding his horse off Wheeling hill over a 300-foot cliff. Major McColloch had just led his troops into the safety of Fort Henry when he was cut-off by hostile Indians. He escaped that day only to be caught and killed five years later in July 1782. As was the traditional practice, the Native Americans presumably cut out McCulloch's heart and ate it to gain his courage.
Close-up of image on marker
Betty Zane image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 30, 2013
4. Betty Zane
❷ The final attack on Fort Henry was September 1782 and is recognized as the last battle of the Revolutionary War. During that siege when gunpowder was running dangerously low, Betty Zane, a young settler, dashed to retrieve gunpowder stored in the a building outside of the fort's safety. Her heroic run saved Fort Henry and its inhabitants.
Close-up of image on marker
The Mingo image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 30, 2013
5. The Mingo
❸ Early residents of the Ohio Valley, the Mingo Indians were related to the Iroquois Indians. These Native Americans lived by hunting deer, buffalo, fox, wild turkeys, beaver, and bald eagles, and they also traded with the Europeans. The Mingo Indian statue, whose arm is outstretched as a gesture of openness and welcome to travelers along the National Road, stands along U.S. Route 40 at the top of Wheeling Hill.
Close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 4, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 568 times since then and 60 times this year. Last updated on January 7, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 4, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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