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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Colmar Manor in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Crossroads of Trade and Travel

Battle of Bladensburg

 

—Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail —

 
Crossroads of Trade and Travel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 2, 2014
1. Crossroads of Trade and Travel Marker
Inscription. Standing here, where the 120-foot long wooden bridge would have carried the road between Bladensburg and Washington D.C., a traveler in 1814 would have experienced all manner of travel in and out of the popular community. Established in the 1740's as a 40-foot-deep port with tobacco weigh stations, and two doctors by 1776. Road converged from Annapolis, Baltimore, Washington , and Upper Marlboro. By 1814, Bladensburg's port was in decline due to silting, but it had become popular for day-trippers, especially from Georgetown, to experience the Spa Springs. By the Mid-nineteenth century, the port closed. Today the river continues to silt and remains very shallow.

Across the Anacostia River and to the left is "George Washington House" - an early store attached to the former Indian Queen Tavern. Further along Annapolis Road are the Hilleary-Magruder House, the Market Master building, and Bostwick. Built by Christopher Lowndes, a wealthy merchant, rope maker, and shipbuilder, Boswick was also home to Secretary of the Navy Benjamin Stoddert. These historic buildings are reminders of the historic crossroads of Bladensburg.

"...just after crossing the bridge at the entrance of the town, the view is very inviting. Soft masses of smoke-like willows lean over the water, and the stream curves in graceful sweeps around
Crossroads of Trade and Travel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 2, 2014
2. Crossroads of Trade and Travel Marker
wooded points, as if tentatively feeling its way to the land of faery..."
- Eben Jenks Loomis, "Wayside Sketches," 1894
 
Erected 2014 by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 56.284′ N, 76° 56.586′ W. Marker is in Colmar Manor, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Bladensburg Road. Touch for map. Marker is in Colmar Manor Park on the west end of the Annapolis Road Bridge crossing the Anacostia River, along the Anacostia River Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Brentwood MD 20722, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Storming the Bridge (here, next to this marker); The Road to the Capital (here, next to this marker); Veterans Memorial (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); World War II Honor Roll (about 800 feet away); Peace Cross (about 800 feet away); Undaunted In Battle (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Road to the Capital (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bladensburg Monuments (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Colmar Manor.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsRoads & VehiclesWar of 1812
 
Battle of Bladensburg image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 2, 2014
3. Battle of Bladensburg
Detail of Richard Schlect's painting "Battle of Bladensburg" showing the village of Bladensburg.
Close-up of image on marker
Three Markers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 2, 2014
4. Three Markers
"Crossroads" marker is the leftmost of the three.
Annapolis Road Bridge over the Anacostia River image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 2, 2014
5. Annapolis Road Bridge over the Anacostia River
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 3, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 332 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 3, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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