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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Maumee in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fallen Timbers Battle Monument

 
 
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, August 2004
1. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument
The small marker at the entrance is a National Historic Landmark plaque. Fallen Timbers Battlefield was designated a National Historic Landmark on October 9, 1960.











Inscription.
(Front)
The Greenville Treaty
To General Anthony Wayne who organized the “Legion of the United States” by order of President Washington and defeated Chief Little Turtle’s warriors here at Fallen Timbers August 20, 1794. This victory led to the Treaty of Greenville, August 3, 1795. Which opened much of the present state of Ohio to white settlers.

(Right Side)
Indian Warfare
In memory of the white
settlers massacred 1783-1794

(Left Side)
Onward in peace
To the pioneers of Ohio
And the great northwest

(Back)
The Battle of Fallen Timbers
To Chief Little Turtle and his brave Indian warriors

 
Erected 1962.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 41° 32.6′ N, 83° 41.796′ W. Marker is in Maumee, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker can be reached from State Park Road 0.1 miles south of Fallen Timbers Lane. Touch for map. This monument is located in Fallen Timbers State Park. Marker is in this post office area: Maumee OH 43537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Turkey Foot Rock (a few steps from this marker);
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, August 2004
2. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument
American Indians at the Battle of Fallen Timbers (a few steps from this marker); Fallen Timbers Battle Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Fallen Timbers (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battle of Fallen Timbers (about 400 feet away); Maumee River Rapids (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fighting Forces (approx. 0.4 miles away); A Long March (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Maumee.
 
Regarding Fallen Timbers Battle Monument. The Battle of Fallen Timbers, August 20, 1794, has been called the “last battle of the American Revolution” and one of the three most important battles in the development of our nation.

Fallen Timbers Battlefield was designated a National Historic Landmark on October 9, 1960.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fallen Timber Battlefield Today. (Submitted on June 6, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.)
2. Touring Ohio. This web site has a lot of good information of the Battle of Fallen Timbers (Submitted on June 6, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.) 

3. Video of Fallen Timbers Battle Monument. This short YouTube video
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Ben-Ariel, June 13, 2009
3. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker
Blue Sky at Fallen Timbers Battle Monument
describes the parts of the monument. (Submitted on February 21, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

4. The Fallen Timbers Battle Monument is Mad!. (Submitted on June 15, 2009, by David Ben-Ariel of Toledo, Ohio.)
5. Fallen Timbers, Maumee, Ohio (photos and commentary). (Submitted on June 15, 2009, by David Ben-Ariel of Toledo, Ohio.)
 
Additional comments.
1. The Fallen Timbers Battle Monument is Mad!
What a schizophrenic monument! Manifest Destiny decreed the White Settlers would triumph over the Beringian immigrants ("Indians") and they did. All things considered, every battle has winners and losers. Are we to expect battle monuments across our God-given nation that tells "both sides" of the story? What confusion!

The Fallen Timbers Battle Monument is mad! One side praises the White Settlers, another side memorializes the massacre of White Settlers, another side praises Indians who murdered the settlers and another side celebrates Pioneers who were able to move onward in peace (thanks to peace through strength).
    — Submitted June 16, 2009, by David Ben-Ariel of Toledo, Ohio.

 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument (front) image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, August 2004
4. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument (front)
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Ben-Ariel, June 13, 2009
5. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker
The Greenville Treaty
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument (back) image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, August 2004
6. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument (back)
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Ben-Ariel, June 13, 2009
7. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker
The Battle of Fallen Timbers
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument (right) image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, August 2004
8. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument (right)
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Ben-Ariel, June 13, 2009
9. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker
Indian Warfare
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument (left) image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, August 2004
10. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument (left)
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Ben-Ariel, June 13, 2009
11. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker
Onward in Peace
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Ben-Ariel, June 13, 2009
12. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker
Walking on the trail looking up to the Monument
Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Ben-Ariel, June 13, 2009
13. Fallen Timbers Battle Monument Marker
General Anthony Wayne image. Click for full size.
14. General Anthony Wayne
(January 1, 1745–December 15, 1796), was a United States Army general and statesman. Wayne adopted a military career at the outset of the American Revolutionary War, where his military exploits and fiery personality quickly earned him a promotion to the rank of brigadier general and the sobriquet of "Mad Anthony".
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 6, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. This page has been viewed 5,305 times since then and 136 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 6, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.   3. submitted on June 15, 2009, by David Ben-Ariel of Toledo, Ohio.   4. submitted on June 6, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.   5. submitted on June 15, 2009, by David Ben-Ariel of Toledo, Ohio.   6. submitted on June 6, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.   7. submitted on June 15, 2009, by David Ben-Ariel of Toledo, Ohio.   8. submitted on June 6, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.   9. submitted on June 15, 2009, by David Ben-Ariel of Toledo, Ohio.   10. submitted on June 6, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.   11, 12, 13. submitted on June 15, 2009, by David Ben-Ariel of Toledo, Ohio.   14. submitted on June 6, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. • Christopher Busta-Peck was the editor who published this page.
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