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Aiken in Aiken County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Defense of Aiken

 
 
Defense of Aiken Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 2008
1. Defense of Aiken Marker
Inscription.
In Memory of
the Confederate
soldiers who lost
their lives in
defense of Aiken,
Feb. 11, 1865
Erected by the Memorial
Association 1911

 
Erected 1911 by The Memorial Association.
 
Location. 33° 33.625′ N, 81° 43.066′ W. Marker is in Aiken, South Carolina, in Aiken County. Marker can be reached from York Street NE (U.S. 1) near Richland Avenue (U.S. 78). Touch for map. In the extreme SE corner of Aiken First Baptist Church grounds; Broken off and settling flat , in the ground. Marker is in this post office area: Aiken SC 29801, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Aiken County Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Aiken First Baptist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Aiken County 125th Anniversary (within shouting distance of this marker); The Detection of the Neutrino, 1956 / The Nobel Prize In Physics, 1995 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battle of Aiken (about 400 feet away); St. John's Methodist Church
Defense of Aiken Marker broken off and settling flat , in the ground image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
2. Defense of Aiken Marker broken off and settling flat , in the ground
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Original Survey of Aiken (approx. 0.2 miles away); William Aiken, Sr. (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Aiken.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Aiken, Written by Pete Peter. "...Sherman’s cavalry commander, Union Brig. Gen. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick, reportedly spent $5,000 in Savannah for matches for his troopers...." (Submitted on May 28, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Re-enactment The Battle of Aiken, SC. The Battle of Aiken, SC behind the lines of the 22NC Co. B. (Submitted on February 28, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Defense of Aiken Marker
The marble marker, which lies flat on the ground beside its intended marble base, measures thirty-six inches tall. The Ladies Memorial Association of Aiken and the women of the U.D.C. erected this marker in a ceremony held at the site at 6 p.m. on June 5, 1911. It was originally placed in an upright position to mark the gave of an unknown Confederate soldier, who was buried where he fell during the battle of Aiken. Because the grave sites
Defense of Aiken Marker located at Aiken First Baptist Church grounds , SE corner image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
3. Defense of Aiken Marker located at Aiken First Baptist Church grounds , SE corner
of the other Confederate dead were unknown, this site was chosen to represent all the Confederates who died in the defense of Aiken...Rev. T.D. Johnson opened with a prayer, and Mayor Giles presided. Giles introduced Rev. J.B. Traywick, a Confederate veteran, who made a touching and patriotic tribute to the dead soldiers and at the conclusion of his remarks, presented a Cross of honor to two sons of Confederate veterans. (Source: A Guide to Confederate Monuments in South Carolina: "Passing the Silent Cup" by Robert S. Seigler, 1997, pgs. 44-45.)
    — Submitted February 28, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. The Battle of Aiken
Aiken was the scene of a street battle on February 11, 1865. Union Major General Judson Kilpatrick's cavalry was surprised on both flanks by Confederate Major General Joe Wheeler's cavalry. Kilpatrick had been warned repeatedly that Wheeler's men were in the area possibly trying to set up a trip, but the man known as "Kit-Calvary" for his hard driving of men and horses could not have cared less. Dozens of Kilpatrick's men were cut down by Confederate pistols. Those who could still breathe turned tail and galloped off, with the Confederates in hot pursuit.

Kilpatrick led the scramble out of town, with several Confederates riding amongst the Federals in an attempt to pull the general off his horse and take him prisoner. If there was one thing Kilpatrick always did well, it was ride his horse away from Confederates. He escaped. More than ninety Federals were taken prisoner. Kilpatrick's hat was also captured. (Source: Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites by Clint Johnson, pg 365.)
    — Submitted March 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 8, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,641 times since then and 73 times this year. Last updated on September 12, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 8, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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