Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Eleanor Roosevelt

 
 
Eleanor Roosevelt Marker image. Click for full size.
By Erik Lander, August 28, 2016
1. Eleanor Roosevelt Marker
Inscription. October 11, 1884 - November 7, 1962
Humanitarian, reformer, stateswoman made this her Greenwich Village home from 1942 - 1949
 
Erected 1986 by New York University.
 
Location. 40° 43.935′ N, 73° 59.913′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is on Washington Square North. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 29 Washington Square North, New York NY 10011, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. No. 22 Washington Square North (within shouting distance of this marker); Lorraine Vivian Hansberry (within shouting distance of this marker); Alexander Lyman Holley (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 80 Washington Place (about 400 feet away); Willa Cather and Richard Wright (about 500 feet away); Bella Abzug (about 500 feet away); Edward I. Koch (about 500 feet away); Birthplace of Galo Plaza Lasso (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Also see . . .  Eleanor Roosevelt - National First Ladies Library. (Submitted on September 6, 2016, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. PoliticsWomen
 
Eleanor Roosevelt Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
July 27, 2017
2. Eleanor Roosevelt Marker - Wide View
The marker is visible just to the left of the entrance.
Eleanor Roosevelt image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 17, 2018
3. Eleanor Roosevelt
This 1946 portrait of Eleanor Roosevelt was loaned to the National Portrait Gallery by Ford and Marni Roosevelt.

“As the nation's first lady from March 1933 to April 1945, Eleanor Roosevelt transcended her role as hostess and proved to be a vital force in Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration. She took public stands on issues ranging from exploitive labor practices to civil rights and often urged her husband to advocate for causes he might otherwise have avoided. Her activism did not end with her departure from the White House. As a U.S. delegate to the United Nations (1945-52), Mrs. Roosevelt was instrumental in formulating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and securing its ratification by the General Assembly in 1948.

This painting, which is based on a photograph from 1944, was created by a Polish artist and may have been presented to the first lady as a gesture of gratitude. In 1946, Mrs. Roosevelt repeatedly called attention to the terrible conditions in post-war Poland.” – National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 24, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 5, 2016, by Erik Lander of Brooklyn, New York. This page has been viewed 276 times since then and 71 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 5, 2016, by Erik Lander of Brooklyn, New York.   2. submitted on July 29, 2017.   3. submitted on July 23, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.