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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Augusta in Richmond County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson

 
 
Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 2008
1. Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson Marker
Inscription. Woodrow Wilson, later to become 27th President of the United States, lived in this Manse of the First Presbyterian Church of which his father, Dr. Joseph R. Wilson, was pastor from 1858 to 1870. Wilson was born in Staunton, Va., in 1856 and he later attended the University of Virginia Law School, graduating in 1881 having previously graduated from Princeton University. He practiced law in Atlanta and in 1885 was married in the Manse of the Savannah Independent Presbyterian Church to Ellen Louise Axson of Rome, Ga. He later studied political science at Johns Hopkins and taught at Bryn Mawr, Johns Hopkins and Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn. He was called to Princeton as professor of jurisprudence and political economy in 1890 and became President of Princeton in 1902. He was elected Governor of New Jersey in 1910 and President of the United States in 1912, being re-elected in 1916. He led the country to victory in the First World War and personally attended the Paris Peace Conference where he fathered the ill-starred League of Nations. He became ill in 1919 and died in 1924.

During his boyhood here his playmate and next door neighbor was Joseph Rucker Lamar, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia, 1902-1905 and of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1910, till his death in 1916.
 
Erected
Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 26, 2008
2. Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson Marker
1955 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 121-18.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 33° 28.299′ N, 81° 57.896′ W. Marker is in Augusta, Georgia, in Richmond County. Marker is on 7th Street near Telfair Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 419 7th St, Augusta GA 30901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Joseph R. Lamar, Associate Justice (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Presbyterian Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The First Presbyterian Church (about 300 feet away); Emily Tubman Monument (about 400 feet away); First Christian Church (about 500 feet away); Church Of The Most Holy Trinity (about 500 feet away); Two Early Augusta Churches (about 500 feet away); Eve (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Augusta.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Boyhood Home in Columbia, SC
 
Also see . . .
1. The White House: Woodrow Wilson. Wilson had seen the frightfulness of
Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson Marker
It was designated a National Historic Landmark on October 6, 2008 #79000746
war. He was born in Virginia in 1856, the son of a Presbyterian minister who during the Civil War was a pastor in Augusta, Georgia, and during Reconstruction a professor in the charred city of Columbia, South Carolina. (Submitted on August 3, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson. The 28th President of the United States spent his boyhood years in this home. (Submitted on January 21, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
Woodrow Wilson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
4. Woodrow Wilson
This c. 1919 painting of Woodrow Wilson by John Christen Johansen hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Elected to the White House after winning wide acclaim as the reforming governor of New Jersey, Woodrow Wilson left an impressive legacy of change that sought to curb abusive business practices and improve conditions for workers. But Wilson was not as successful in winning approval for his inter­national idealism during World War I. Determined to make this conflict ‘the war to end all wars,’ he sought at its end to create a world order that put peace ahead of national self-interest. America's European allies, however, undermined these hopes, insisting on a postwar peace settlement that contained the seeds of another war. A far worse disappointment for Wilson himself was his failure to persuade his own country to join the League of Nations, an organization he had conceived as the best hope for avoiding future wars. Having suffered a stroke while campaigning for American entry into the league, he left office in 1921, broken in both health and spirit.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 3, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,028 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 3, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on October 1, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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