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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Basking Ridge in Somerset County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead

Circa 1760

 
 
Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas R. D'Amico, October 23, 2015
1. Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead Marker
Inscription. Lying along the Passaic River, the farmstead was first developed early in the second half of the 18th century. At one time, the property encompassed 340 acres with 14 structures including a Dutch framed farmhouse, wagon house, and large English framed barn.

The first notable resident was Reverend Samuel Kennedy, a distinguished local minister and founder of a prestigious classical school who purchased the property in 1762. Later the property was acquired by Colonel Ephraim Martin, an officer in the Continental Army and highly respected politician who was instrumental in the ratification of the federal Bill of Rights. The Stelle family acquired the property in 1794 and farmed the land through 1852. The property was actively farmed for over 250 years before being acquired by Bernards Township in 1999.
 
Erected 2015 by Somerset County Board of Chosen Freeholders.
 
Location. 40° 39.492′ N, 74° 31.818′ W. Marker is in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, in Somerset County. Marker can be reached from King George Road (County Route 651). Touch for map. The marker is approximately 40 feet up the driveway from King George Road. Marker is at or near this postal address: 450 King George Road, Basking Ridge NJ 07920, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.

Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas R. D'Amico, October 23, 2015
2. Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead Marker
At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead (about 600 feet away); Morris County (approx. half a mile away); Frederick W. Schmidt (approx. 1.2 miles away); Millington Schoolhouse #74 (approx. 1.4 miles away); Vail Family (approx. 1.4 miles away); Mt. Bethel Meeting House (approx. 1.6 miles away); Lyons Station (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Basking Ridge.
 
More about this marker. The Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead is a vestige of Bernard’s Township’s rural agricultural past. Dating back to the mid 18th century, the one-and-one half story farmhouse, with its Dutch framing system, typifies the regions early domestic architecture. The farmhouse contains evidence of its Colonial past, as well as Georgian, Federal, Victorian and Colonial Revival features. The four-bay 18th century barn, with a c.1840 addition, is a notable example of the English barn type. It exhibits hand-hewn rafters with pegged wind braces and a lower level stable at on end. The wagon house (c.1750-1820) exhibits both Dutch and English framing techniques.
 
Regarding Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead.
Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas R. D, October 31, 2006
3. Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead Marker
The Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead is owned by Bernards Township and is operated by the Friends of the Kennedy-Martin-Stelle Farmstead. Located at the site is Farmstead Arts which is a community of artists and visionaries who are dedicated to creating a home for fine, performing and practical arts (www.farmsteadartscenter.org).
 
Categories. AgricultureChurches, Etc.Colonial EraWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 31, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 23, 2015, by Thomas R. D'Amico of Somerville, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 271 times since then and 31 times this year. Last updated on October 25, 2016, by Thomas R. D'Amico of Somerville, New Jersey. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 23, 2015, by Thomas R. D'Amico of Somerville, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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