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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Clarksburg in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Our Daily Bread

The Hyattstown Mill

 
 
Our Daily Bread Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 16, 2016
1. Our Daily Bread Marker
Inscription. In operation since 1798, Hyattstown Mill was known for its “fine stone-ground white and yellow cornmeal." Destroyed by fire in 1918, the new mill was quickly rebuilt on the old foundation and remained a crucial local business until the mid-1930s.

The New Patented Marvel Process

While continuing to utilize water propelled stone buhrs to grind Corn, proprietors Frank. Mortimer and Charles Luhn also outfitted their new facility with the Midget Marvel, a self-contained gasoline operated roller mill distributed by the Anglo-American Mill Company. This new machinery allowed for more efficient processing of wheat flour. Using this equipment also resulted in a more sanitary operation, as “no hands but yours” — that of the consumer — touched the final product. Due to the public health movement, the quality of flour had to achieve “perfect cleanliness” in manufacturing and packaging.

The Mark of Quality

By 1922, over a quarter of all flour mills in the United States used the Midget Marvel. Hyattsown Roller Mills became one of more than 1,300 American facilities to advertise and sell “FLavo FLour.” Known for its distinctive nut-like flavor, FLavo was
“often buttered, never bettered”

White
Hyattstown Mill image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 16, 2016
2. Hyattstown Mill
The original Hyattstown Mill went up in flames in a matter of minutes. With community assistance and limited funds, the owners rebuilt the mill using recycled sheet metal siding from a local warehouse at Price's Distillery as seen in this 1974 photo.
Close-up of photo on marker
of Whole Wheat?


In the 1913 national publication, Economy Administration Cookbook, Montgomery County resident Mrs. Townsend supplied a recipe for Steamed Brown Bread that utilized 5 cups of “graham” flour. The coarse-textured whole-wheat she suggested was healthier option to white flour, because,it aided in better digestion and'overall vitality. Nutritionists believed the milling milling process stripped white flour of essential vitamins necessary for a balanced diet. Hyattstown Mill sold “graham whole-wheat,“ identifying this commodity as “the health giving flour” All three components of the wheat kernel -- bran, germ, and endosperm are ground separately, and then mixed back together to make this product.
 
Location. 39° 16.784′ N, 77° 18.707′ W. Marker is in Clarksburg, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Hyattstown Mill Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 14290 Hyattstown Mill Road, Clarksburg MD 20871, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hyattstown Mill (a few steps from this marker); Hyattstown (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Women on the Homefront in Montgomery County
Home of FLavo = FLour image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 16, 2016
3. Home of FLavo = FLour
This 1917 illustration of a mill building clearly shows that dependence on water-powered machinery was a thing of the past. Instead, turbine operations relied on either steam or gas.
Close-up of image on marker
SPOOM
(approx. 0.6 miles away); A Real Field of Dreams (approx. 1.1 miles away); Welcome to Froggy Hollow (approx. 2.1 miles away); George Washington (was approx. 2.9 miles away but has been reported missing. ); a different marker also named George Washington (approx. 2.9 miles away); 1862 Antietam Campaign (approx. 3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Clarksburg.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made Features
 
The Economy Administration Cook Book image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 16, 2016
4. The Economy Administration Cook Book
Prominent politically connected women, like Mrs. J. W. Townsend of Kensington submitted recipes for this cookbook in honor of Helen Wilson.
Close-up of image on marker
Reverse Image Postcard image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 16, 2016
5. Reverse Image Postcard
In this early-20th century reverse image postard, the male “breadwinner” is less concerned with his budget than pleasing his wife through the purchase of top quality flour from Hyattstown Roller Mills.
Close-up of image on marker
John McGrain
The Midget Marvel image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 16, 2016
6. The Midget Marvel
Marketed as “modern scientific,” the Midget Marvel Roller was the only short process mill that was affiliated with the production of FLavo FLour. {The sign on the machine reads: “Don't Spit On the Floor”}
Close-up of photo/diagram on marker
SPOOM
Notice to Frederick House Keepers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 16, 2016
7. Notice to Frederick House Keepers
Hyattstown Roller Mills, Mortimer & Luhn Props; newspaper advertisement.
Close-up of image on marker
Flavo. Flour image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 16, 2016
8. Flavo. Flour
In addition to producing the equipment, the Anglo-American Company also generated stock FLavo ads the members of the Community Marvel Millers' Association, such as the Hyattstown Mill, could use in local newspapers, replacing the older traditional adds (photo #7).
Close-up of image on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 11, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 13, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 266 times since then and 72 times this year. Last updated on November 10, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 13, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8. submitted on July 19, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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