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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lansing in Ingham County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Lansing's First Capitol Building / Lansing Becomes the Capital City

 
 
Lansing's First Capitol Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, November 20, 2016
1. Lansing's First Capitol Building Marker
Inscription.
Lansing's First Capitol Building
Early in 1847, three commissioners were appointed to select an appropriate site for the capitol in Lansing. The contract for construction was awarded on June 3, 1847. Building materials were shipped by boat on the Grand River or by rail from Detroit to Jackson and by wagon on cut trails through the woods to Lansing. Gradually, the capitol rose on this site. It was described as "a church-like little structure of wood painted white." The building measured 60 feet by 100 feet, was two stories high and had a cupola. A white picket fence set it off from the surrounding forest. It contained legislative and supreme court chambers, an office for the governor, a few other offices and a library. Completed in late 1847, it was used until the present capitol was completed in 1879.

Lansing Becomes the Capital City
The territorial courthouse that served as Michigan's first state capitol was completed in Detroit in 1828. However, Michigan's first constitution made Detroit a temporary capital and said a permanent site should be chosen by 1847. As the deadline approached, nearly every town in Michigan was proposed. James Seymour, a land speculator with a mill in what is now North Lansing, campaigned for Lansing Township, pointing out its locations equidistant from Detroit, Monroe, Mt. Clemens

Lansing Becomes the Capital City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, November 20, 2016
2. Lansing Becomes the Capital City Marker
and the mouths of the Grand and Kalamazoo rivers. The house voted on thirteen sites before selecting Lansing; and the senate voted fifty-one times before it accepted the house's recommendation that the wilderness township with less than 100 people become the new state capital.
 
Erected 1987 by Bureau of History, Michigan Department of State. (Marker Number S587C.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Michigan Historical Commission marker series.
 
Location. 42° 43.945′ N, 84° 33.13′ W. Marker is in Lansing, Michigan, in Ingham County. Marker is at the intersection of South Washington Square and W. Allegan Street on South Washington Square. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lansing MI 48933, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Freedom Patriotism Humanity (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Michigan State Capitol / Michigan's Three Capitols (about 600 feet away); Town of Michigan /Lansing (about 700 feet away); Austin Blair (about 700 feet away); Michigan State Capitol (about 700 feet away); Michigan
Lansing's First Capitol Building / Lansing Becomes the Capital City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, November 20, 2016
3. Lansing's First Capitol Building / Lansing Becomes the Capital City Marker
(about 800 feet away); First Regiment Michigan Engineers (about 800 feet away); Joe Louis Barrow 1914-1981 (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lansing.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 25, 2016, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 115 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 25, 2016, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.
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