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Bay Minette, Alabama Marker (side 2) image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, January 14, 2017
Bay Minette, Alabama Marker (side 2)
Alabama (Baldwin County), Bay Minette — Bay Minette, Alabama
Side 1 In 1860, the center of commerce in Baldwin County ran along the rivers with the remainder of the county mostly wilderness. In 1861, with secession declared, the Alabama Legislature allocated funds to finish the stalled Mobile . . . — Map (db m100846) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Orange Beach — Orange Beach Municipal Complex
The community of Orange Beach goes back to at least 1838, as evidenced by property deeds. As an incorporated city, it is quite young. Following Hurricane Frederic on September 12, 1979, with all its publicity, Orange Beach was 'discovered'! . . . — Map (db m122462) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — EufaulaIncorporated, December 19, 1857 — Bluff City on the Chattahoochee. —
Lower Creek village of the Eufaula Indians antedating 1733. Early white settlers began moving into the village called Yufala in 1823. Irwinton chartered 1832, and renamed Eufaula in 1843. Hub of a prosperous plantation region with thriving . . . — Map (db m48432) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Louisville — Louisville and "Old Alabama" — Creek Heritage Trail —
Louisville is one of the oldest communities in southeastern Alabama. Locąted within territory ceded by the Creeks in the Treaty of Fort Jackson (1814) ending the Creek War, the area was first settled by Americans as early as 1817. Many of its . . . — Map (db m111642) HM
Alabama (Chambers County), Lanett — Bluffton-Lanett, Alabama
Side 1 Known as Bluffton from about 1835-1893. Bluffton was incorporated in 1865. Name changed to Lanett, town of Lanett incorporated 1893. Its charter was approved in 1895. Early records mention academies, two near this site. The . . . — Map (db m92061) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Sand Rock — Sand Rock
The town was named for the characteristics of local rocks. A post office was established in 1855 and closed in 1903. The Sand Rock High School Wildcats won the Class 1A football championship in 1985 and the Class 2A State softball championship in . . . — Map (db m116616) HM
Alabama (Clay County), Ashland — Clay County / Clay County Courthouse
Clay County Established Dec. 7, 1866 Boundaries of eastern Talladega County and western Randolph County were redrawn in 1866 to create the 58th county of Alabama. The name honors U. S. Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky. Historical place . . . — Map (db m95095) HM
Alabama (Coosa County), Rockford — Coosa County / Old Rock Jail
Coosa County Named for the river on its western border, Coosa County was created by the Alabama Legislature on December 18, 1832, from land ceded by the Creek Nation in the Treaty of Cusseta. The name is taken from the Native American word . . . — Map (db m131716) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahaba's Changing Landscape
In 1818, Alabama's first governor carved the capital city of Cahawba out of the wilderness. In less than 50 years, Cahawba grew from a frontier capital full of log cabins to one of America's wealthiest communities, with some of the . . . — Map (db m112690) HM
Alabama (Escambia County), Pollard — Site of Pollard
Located 1½ miles south, town of Pollard established 1861 at juncture of Alabama & Florida and Mobile & Great Northern railroads. Named for Charles T. Pollard, builder of Alabama & Florida Railroad. One of largest military training camps of . . . — Map (db m84371) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Cottonwood — Southern Boundary of the United States1795-1819
On October 27, 1795, the United States concluded the Treaty of San Lorenzo with Spain, establishing 31 north latitude as the boundary between its southern territory and West Florida. Despite Spanish delays, commissions representing the two . . . — Map (db m73359) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Dothan — Houston County
After much politicking, on February 9, 1903, delegates from this area, T.M. Espy, Byrd Farmer, and George H. Malone, were successful in getting a bill passed in the State Legislature to form a new county from parts of Henry, Dale, and Geneva . . . — Map (db m41135) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Hoover — HooverA Great Place to Live
The City of Hoover was founded in 1967 by William H. Hoover and consisted of four city blocks and only 410 citizens. Hoover grew rapidly in the following 43 years to more than 75,000 residents within 50 square miles, making it the sixth largest city . . . — Map (db m52179) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — City of Florence
Florence was surveyed for the Cypress Land Company in 1818 by Ferdinand Sannoner and named for the famous capital of Tuscany. The county seat of Lauderdale County, it was first incorporated in 1826. Located at the foot of Muscle Shoals, it became a . . . — Map (db m35173) HM
Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — A County Older Than the StateLimestone County
created Feb. 6, 1818 by Alabama Territorial Legislature from lands ceded by Cherokee Nation 1806 and by Chickasaw Nation in 1816. Named for creek (and its limestone bed), which runs through county. Few settlers here until Indian treaties. Athens . . . — Map (db m29109) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Fisk — 2F3 — Tennessee / AlabamaLincoln County /
Tennessee. Lincoln County. Established 1809; named in honor of MAJOR GEN. BENJAMIN LINCOLN of the Revolutionary Army. After service at Saratoga, he was put in Chief Command in the Southern Colonies. Later, he was Secretary of War under the . . . — Map (db m30570) HM
Alabama (Marion County), Guin — Historical PikevilleCounty Seat of Marion County — 1820-1882 —
Side 1 Pikeville, designated as the first permanent county seat for Marion County, lies along General Andrew Jackson's Military Road. Earlier temporary county seats were mostly along the Tombigbee River in what was Mississippi when the . . . — Map (db m96485) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Mobile City Limits — 1711 —
When Mobile was laid out, this was the city's north-east boundary point. Royal Street ran along a bluff overlooking the Mobile River. There were no streets between Royal and the river, only marshland. — Map (db m86347) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Mobile City Limits — 1711 —
At this point the northwest limits of French Mobile faded into the dense forest which surrounded the city in 1711 and many years thereafter. An 1815 map shows the forest reaching Joachim Street, one block west. — Map (db m86348) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Mobile City Limits — 1711 —
This site marks the southwestern limit of the city of Mobile in 1711. Known then as Fort Louis de la Mobile, it had been founded by the French at 27-Mile Bluff in 1702 and moved to its present site in 1711. Mobile has been a city under six . . . — Map (db m131883) HM
Alabama (Perry County), Marion — Marion
County Seat of Perry County Population 4457 Founded by Anderson West in 1822 Home of Judson College and Marion Military Institute Friendly People Welcome You. — Map (db m116895) HM
Alabama (Russell County), Seale — Early Russell County and the Town of Seale — Creek Heritage Trail —
Russell County was one of several counties created by the Alabama legislature in December, 1832 from land that had been part of the Creeks' ancestral homeland. The community of Girard (modern Phenix City) along the Chattahoochee River became the . . . — Map (db m111609) HM
Alabama (Russell County), Seale — Old Russell County Courthouse
During the Federal occupation of the former Confederate States of America, the Alabama Legislature created Lee County primarily from the northern half of Russell County in 1866 and ordered the selection of the county seat "more centrally located." . . . — Map (db m53160) HM
Alabama (St. Clair County), Pell City — None — A County Older Than The StateSt. Clair County
Created in 1818 by territorial legislature. Named for Revolutionary hero, Gen. St. Clair. First settlers from Tennessee, Georgia – veterans of Creek Indian War, 1813-14. Pell City established as industrial town in 1890 by George H. Pell of . . . — Map (db m49666) HM
Alabama (St. Clair County), Pell City — None — Pell City, Alabama
The town charter for Pell City was granted in 1887. The town was named for George Hamilton Pell, a prominent New York industrialist and president of the East and West Railroad. In 1901, the town was almost deserted when a young man named Sumter . . . — Map (db m49656) HM
Alabama (Sumter County), Livingston — Sumter County
1736:   First settlement by French at Ft. Tombecbee. 1830:   U.S. got Choctaw Indian lands by Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. 1832:   County created by Act of State Legislature -- named for Gen. Thomas Sumter, "The Gamecock," South . . . — Map (db m92663) HM
Alabama (Washington County), Chatom — Washington CountyFirst County in Alabama
Created in 1800 by proclamation of governor of Mississippi Territory. This was first U.S. civil government in area that was to become Alabama. Its original boundaries: East to west: Chattahoochee to Pearl River; South, 31° lat. . . . — Map (db m122343) HM
Arkansas (Arkansas County), Arkansas Post — The American Era
The land passed from France to the United States in 1803 with the Louisiana Purchase. Arkansas then became a territory on March 2, 1819: the Post of Arkansas was designated its capital. The Territorial Secretary Robert Crittendon, acting in the . . . — Map (db m108651) HM
Arkansas (Ashley County), Hamburg — F-18 — Ashley County Court House
The first court house in Ashley County was erected on this site in 1849. The county having been created the year before. — Map (db m107740) HM
Arkansas (Bradley County), Warren — F-17 — Bradley County Court House
The first temporary court house in Bradley County was erected on this site in 1842, two years after the creation of the county, and continued in use until 1858, when a court house built of brick was erected. — Map (db m121054) HM
Arkansas (Chicot County), Lake Village — G-8 — Chicot CountyCounty Seat
The county seat of Chicot County was located at Columbia in 1823, where it remained until 1855. The county took its name from Point Chicot, on the Mississippi. — Map (db m89773) HM
Arkansas (Clark County), Arkadelphia — Clark County
Clark County was created by the legislature of Missouri Territory on Dec. 15, 1818 and named for the territorial governor, William Clark. It comprised, roughly, all of the present Clark, Hot Spring, Garland, Pike and Dallas counties. Early county . . . — Map (db m121379) HM
Arkansas (Clay County), St. Francis — Chalk Bluff
Named for the white clay which resembles chalk, this magnificent bluff is one of the most important historical landmarks in Arkansas. At this point the St. Francis River cuts through Crowley's Ridge from west to east and forms the boundary between . . . — Map (db m18136) HM
Arkansas (Craighead County), Jonesboro — H-12 — Craighead County Court House
The site of Jonesboro was laid off as the county seat of Craighead County in 1859, and there was erected soon afterwards the first court house in the county. — Map (db m116609) HM
Arkansas (Desha County), Kelso — Old Town of Napoleon
This important river port, county seat of Desha County from 1838 to 1874, was located 24 miles east at the junction of the Arkansas River with the Mississippi. The town was finally abandoned after most of it washed into the Mississippi River. — Map (db m107758) HM
Arkansas (Desha County), Watson — Desha County Seat — 1874 - 1880 —
Watson became the county seat of Desha County after Napoleon was abandoned to the Mississippi River. Lewis W. Watson donated the land and built the courthouse near this site. The county seat was moved to Arkansas City in 1880. Watson remained the . . . — Map (db m107757) HM
Arkansas (Franklin County), Ozark — B-13 — Franklin County Court House
Ozark was designated as the county seat of Franklin County in 1837, and the first court house in the county was erected on this site in 1838. — Map (db m120001) HM
Arkansas (Howard County), Center Point — Center Point
Near this spot in 1837 Robert Messer built the first house in Center Point. A few years later John Russey opened the first store. Center Point acquired its name and post office in 1848, and became an incorporated town in 1859. Held by the . . . — Map (db m121163) HM
Arkansas (Jackson County), Newport — G-3 — Jackson County First Court House
The first court house in Jackson County, created in 1832, was located at Litchfield, where it remained until 1839, when it was moved to Elizabeth. In 1852 Augusta (now Woodruff County) was made the county seat and two years later it was moved to . . . — Map (db m116624) HM
Arkansas (Little River County), Alleene — Original Site of Little River County Seat
Little River County was formed 1867 out of lands taken from Hempstead and Sevier Counties by Act 104 of the Arkansas Legislature approved March 7, 1867. The Act fixed the temporary county seat at the home of William M. Freeman, which was ½ mile . . . — Map (db m121273) HM
Arkansas (Little River County), Ashdown — B-7 — Little River CountyCounty Seat
Rocky Comfort, made the County Seat of Little River County in 1868, continued as such until 1880, when it was moved to Richmond and from there the Seat of Justice was moved to Ashdown. — Map (db m121243) HM
Arkansas (Little River County), Foreman — First Permanent Site of Little River County Seat
The Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868 located the permanent county seat at Rocky Comfort, where it remained until 1880. The first term of court was held there August 4, 1868. A frame court house was erected with offices on the first floor . . . — Map (db m121277) HM
Arkansas (Madison County), Huntsville — D-8 — Madison CountyCounty Government
A county government was organized in Madison County in 1836, in the barn of Evan S. Polk, a short distance northwest of the present town of Huntsville which was laid out as a town and made the permanent seat, of government in 1839. The county was . . . — Map (db m141599) HM
Arkansas (Marion County), Yellville — Marion CountyFirst County Seat
Marion County, created in 1835, was first named Searcy County. In 1836 its name changed to Marion by the first state legislature. That same year Yellville was laid out as a town and made the permanent seat of county government. The county . . . — Map (db m93803) HM
Arkansas (Pike County), Murfreesboro — B-16 — Pike County Court House
The first court house in Pike County, built of logs, was erected on the site of the town of Murfreesboro, which was laid out as a site for the county seat in 1833. — Map (db m121284) HM
Arkansas (Searcy County), Marshall — E-2 — Searcy CountyCounty Seat
The county seat of Searcy County was created in 1838 and was first located at Lebanon, on Bear Creek, about five miles west of the present town of Marshall, to which place the seat of justice was moved in 1856. — Map (db m141600) HM
Arkansas (Sevier County), De Queen — A-6 — Sevier County Seat of Justice
In 1829 the year after the creation of the County of Sevier, the permanent seat of justice for the county was located at Paraclifta on Cossatot River about five miles from the southern boundary of the county where it remained until 1871, when it was . . . — Map (db m121280) HM
Arkansas (Union County), El Dorado — First Union County Courthouse
. . . — Map (db m121964) HM
Arkansas (White County), Searcy — F-13 — White County Court House
In 1837, two years after the creation of White County, the site of the town of Searcy was laid off as the permanent seat of justice of the county. — Map (db m116701) HM
Arkansas (Woodruff County), Augusta — Woodruff County Courthouse
Noted architect: Charles L. Thompson, Nov 30, 1901 Thomas Hough, founder of Augusta in 1848 built his home on this location before the Civil War. During the Federal occupation Gen. Frederick Steele headquartered here. Woodruff County was . . . — Map (db m116628) HM
California (Amador County), Sutter Creek — 1854 · Amador County · 1954
Amador County, carved from Calaveras and El Dorado, was organized July 3, 1854, at the crossroads of Sutter Hill. Act of Legislature, May 11, 1854, set June 17, 1854, as election date for people to vote on such a division, and appointed five . . . — Map (db m11222) HM
California (Riverside County), Corona — 738 — Corona Founders
R. B. Taylor, George L. Joy, Samuel Merrill, A. S. Garretson, and Adolph Rimpau, having purchased lands of the La Sierra Rancho of Bernardo Yorba and the El Temescal Grant of Leandro Serrano on May 4, 1886, founded the citrus colony and town of . . . — Map (db m82151) HM
California (San Bernardino County), Needles — 859 — Von Schmidt State Boundary Monument
This boundary monument, a cast iron column erected in 1873, marks the southern terminus of the California – Nevada State Boundary established by A. W. Von Schmidt's 1872 – 73 survey. Von Schmidt's line, the first officially recognized . . . — Map (db m29467) HM
California (San Bernardino County), Needles — 188 — Von Schmidt State Boundary Monument
This marker commemorates the iron column erected in 1876 at the southernmost tip of the boundary survey line run by Allexey W. Von Schmidt, U. S. astronomer and surveyor. The line dividing Nevada and California was based on preliminary geodetic work . . . — Map (db m29468) HM
California (Solano County), Benicia — 153 — Old State Capitol
Erected in 1852, this historic building was ostensibly intended for Benicia City Hall, offered as the State Capitol and promptly accepted, it had that honor from February 4, 1853 to February 25, 1854. Deeded to state in 1951, it was one of the four . . . — Map (db m16375) HM
California (Yolo County), Davis — After a Fire, the City of Davis is Created
A disastrous fire on November 13, 1916 destroyed much of the two block long downtown business district. The fire started that morning near what is now the corner of G and 3rd Streets, and fierce north winds fanned the flames all day.

. . . — Map (db m144738) HM

Colorado (Arapahoe County), Littleton — Arapahoe County Courthouse
In the early part of the 20th century, Denver served as both the state capital and the Arapahoe County seat. An amendment to the Colorado Constitution creating a new City and County of Denver was passed by Colorado voters in 1902. This left Arapahoe . . . — Map (db m130140) HM
Colorado (Douglas County), Castle Rock — Douglas
The reasons for Douglas County’s popularity in the late twentieth century-rolling landscapes, pastoral scenery, and the proximity to a big city-also attracted late-nineteenth century settlers. In November 1861, territorial legislators created . . . — Map (db m46117) HM
Colorado (Elbert County), Kiowa — 272 — Kiowa
Frontier Communication. Kiowa was originally named after its postmaster, Henry Wendling. Such identifications were common among Colorado’s frontier hamlets, where the post office often was the town. Widely dispersed settlers would congregate . . . — Map (db m45754) HM
Colorado (Morgan County), Fort Morgan — 224 — Fort Morgan
Junction Station, the first settlement at this site, suffered numerous Indian attacks similar to those that raged all along the South Platte during the mid 1860s. To protect the crucial crossroads, which joined the South Platte River Trail with its . . . — Map (db m47322) HM
Colorado (Sedgwick County), Julesburg — Colorado's Northeast Corner
This Tablet is the Property of the State of Colorado The Organic Act creating the Territory of Colorado was signed by President Buchanan on February 26, 1861. The act carved from the territories of Kansas, Nebraska, Utah and New . . . — Map (db m119436) HM
Colorado (Sedgwick County), Julesburg — Fourth Julesburg
In the 1880's, a fourth Julesburg developed at the junction of the Transcontinental Railroad and the Denver Branch of the Union Pacific. Originally known as Denver Junction, the town was soon renamed Julesburg, presumably the last of Jules Beni's . . . — Map (db m47367) HM
Colorado (Sedgwick County), Julesburg — Nearby Things to See and DoJulesburg, Colo.
1. DePoorter Lakeis located off U.S. 385, just south of Julesburg. It offers fishing, picnic tables, restrooms and a wheelchair accessible pathway around the lake.

2. Hippodrome Theatre is newly restored and a source of community pride. . . . — Map (db m47371) HM

Connecticut (Fairfield County), Old Greenwich — Old Greenwich
Under the jurisdiction of the New Haven Colony, the first settlers in 1640 purchased land from the Siwanoy Indians. Under New Amsterdam’s protection, this settlement was a dutch manor during 1642–56. In the years 1656–65, it was combined . . . — Map (db m2484) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ridgefield
This town was founded in 1708 by a group of families from Norwalk who purchased twenty thousand acres from the Ramapoo Indians for one hundred pounds sterling. They were aided by John Copp, a surveyor, who explored the land now lying between High . . . — Map (db m23409) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Woodbury — Woodbury
In 1659 citizens of Stratford purchased from the Pegasset Indians the land, then called Pomperaug Plantation, that is now occupied by Woodbury, Southbury, Roxbury, Bethlehem and parts of Washington, Middlebury and Oxford. It was re-named Woodbury in . . . — Map (db m17607) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Cheswold — KC-6 — Kenton Hundred
Kenton Hundred-Created in 1869 by joining of western halves of Duck Creek and Little Creek Hundreds. Is bounded on north by Blackbird Hundred in New Castle County, on east by Duck Creek and Little Creek Hundreds, on south by East Dover and West . . . — Map (db m141240) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — East Dover Hundred
Originally part of St. Jones Hundred renamed Dover Hundred 1823, the boundaries being Little Creek on north and St. Jones Creek on south, extending from Delaware River to Maryland line. Dover Hundred was divided 1877 into two hundreds, called East . . . — Map (db m51114) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Marydel — West Dover Hundred
Originally part of St. Jones Hundred, renamed Dover Hundred 1823, the boundaries being Little Creek on the north and St. Jones Creek on the south, extending from Delaware River to Maryland Line. Dover Hundred was divided 1877 into two Hundreds, . . . — Map (db m74137) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Viola — K-15 — North Murderkill Hundred
Formerly part of Murderkill Hundred, originally called Motherkill Hundred, kill meaning creek in Dutch. Original boundaries were St. Jones Creek on north, and Murderkill Creek on south, extending from Delaware River to Maryland line. In 1867, . . . — Map (db m51113) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — NC-13 — New Castle Common
This land is part of a tract of one thousand acres set apart by William Penn in 1701 for the inhabitants of the town of New Castle. Trustees were appointed and incorporated by Penn’s heirs in 1764, whose successors still hold and manage the land. — Map (db m3212) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-36 — The Wedge
The wedge-shape tract, west of the Maryland and Delaware curve, consists of approximately 800 acres of land. For more than a century, the property was claimed by Pennsylvania but governed by Delaware. In 1889, a joint committee appointed from both . . . — Map (db m9961) HM
Delaware (Sussex County), Georgetown — SC-86 — “Pettijohn’s Old Field”
The future home of Sussex County’s seat of government was a sparsely populated rural area when the 76 acres which would become the Town of Georgetown were purchased on May 9, 1791. Located “near the centre” of the country at a place . . . — Map (db m423) HM
Delaware (Sussex County), Georgetown — SC-88 — Relocation of the County Seat
The conflicting claims of the proprietors of Maryland and Pennsylvania resulted in a lengthy and sometimes violent dispute concerning the ownership and boundaries of Sussex County. Residents who had been Marylanders before the controversy was . . . — Map (db m424) HM
Delaware (Sussex County), Georgetown — SC-87 — Sussex County Courthouse
In 1835 a lottery was authorized to raise funds to replace the frame structure which had served as Courthouse since 1791. Construction of the new building began in 1837 following the sale and relocation of the original Courthouse to its present site . . . — Map (db m425) HM
Delaware (Sussex County), Lewes — S-31 — Lewes
Under orders from Peter Stuyvesant, the Dutch erected Fort at Hoorn Kil (Lewes Creek) 1659 but were soon dispossessed by Marylanders. Here was also a communistic settlement established in 1662 by Mennonites from Holland under Peter Cornelius . . . — Map (db m19404) HM
Delaware (Sussex County), Lewes — Lewes
The Dutch in 1673 established a court in Hoorn Kil for the inhabitants “on the east and west sides of Cape Henlopen unto Bomties (Bombay) Hook.” Governor Andros of New York in 1676 established an English court at Whorekill, the . . . — Map (db m19408) HM
Delaware (Sussex County), South Fenwick Island — S.C.-74 — Transpeninsular Line
This stone monument, erected April 26, 1751, marks the eastern end of the Transpeninsular Line surveyed 1751-1751 by John Watson and William Parsons of Pennsylvania and John Emory and Thomas Jones of Maryland. This line established the east-west . . . — Map (db m1234) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), East Corner — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, East Cornerstone
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Dist. of Co. Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916 — Map (db m140871) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Lamond Riggs — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 3
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Our Flag Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916 — Map (db m140901) HM
Florida (DeSoto County), Arcadia — F-61 — DeSoto County
Named after the great Spanish conquistador and Florida explorer Hernando De Soto, the county was created out of Manatee County in 1887. The area's original inhabitants were Caloosa Indians. In early Florida history the region was the scene of . . . — Map (db m72534) HM
Florida (Hernando County), Brooksville — F-75 — Hernando County
Hernando County originally embraced Hernando, Pasco and Citrus counties. It was created by the Territorial Legislature in 1843 and named for Hernando DeSoto. In 1844 its name was changed to Benton County in honor of Senator Thomas Hart Benton of . . . — Map (db m123567) HM
Florida (Hillsborough County), Tampa — Cradle of Cuban Liberty
On this corner was located El Liceo Cubano, a tobacco stripping house converted into a Cuban social center in 1886. This is the cradle of Cuban independence. Here, on Nov. 26-27, 1891, Jose Marti delivered the two speeches, "Con Todos y Para . . . — Map (db m15157) HM
Florida (Jackson County), Marianna — F-195 — Jackson County
On August 12, 1822, the year after the United States received possession of the Floridas, an Act of the Territorial Legislative Council divided West Florida into two counties -- Jackson and Escambia. At that time, Jackson County included all . . . — Map (db m74194) HM
Florida (Jefferson County), Monticello — F-279 — Jefferson County Sesquicentennial1827-1977
When Florida’s Territorial Legislative Council established Jefferson County in January, 1827, settlers from the seaboard states already had begun to develop cotton plantations in this area. In December, 1827, the county seat received the name . . . — Map (db m126297) HM
Florida (Lafayette County), Mayo — F-368 — Mayo, County Seat of Lafayette County
Established in 1874 by John B. Whitfield, Mayo was named in honor of James M. Mayo, a colonel in the Confederate Army and father of Nathan Mayo, who served as State Commissioner of Agriculture from 1923 to 1960. Mayo became the county seat of . . . — Map (db m132099) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — Lafayette Township Grant
This marker is on the western boundary line of the land selected by Major General the Marquis de Lafayette and granted by the United States Congress to him in 1825 in appreciation of his services during the Revolutionary War. The grant contains 36 . . . — Map (db m100567) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-45 — Leon County
Originally part of Escambia and later Gadsden Counties, Leon was created by the territorial legislature in 1824. Named for Juan Ponce de Leon, discoverer of Florida, it became antebellum Florida's most prosperous and populous county. Cotton thrived . . . — Map (db m131866) HM
Florida (Okeechobee County), Okeechobee — F-59 — Okeechobee County
Okeechobee County was formed Aug. 7, 1917, from St. Lucie, Osceola and Palm Beach Counties. Long a haunt of the Seminoles, the area saw almost no white penetration until the 2nd Seminole War, 1835-42. Much fighting occurred in the county during the . . . — Map (db m72601) HM
Florida (Sarasota County), Sarasota — Railroad History
The railroad came to Venice in 1911 at the request of Mrs. Potter (Bertha) Palmer. The Seaboard Air Line (SAL) Railway extended its line from Fruitville through Bee Ridge, where the Palmer's Sarasota-Venice Company was developing land, to the . . . — Map (db m124900) HM
Florida (Seminole County), Longwood — Seminole County
  The importance of Seminole County in the history of the area lies in its location at the navigable headwaters of the St. Johns River and the elevated forest land south of the three large lakes within its boundaries: Monroe, Harney, and Jesup. . . . — Map (db m52360) HM
Florida (Seminole County), Longwood — Seminole County
The importance of Seminole County in the history of the area lies in its location at the navigable headwaters of the St. Johns River and the elevated forest land south of the three large lakes within its boundaries: Monroe, Harney, and Jesup. . . . — Map (db m54051) HM
Florida (Suwannee County), Live Oak — F-64 — Suwannee County
This region was originally the land of the Timucuan Indians. Suwannee County was created in 1858. The county seat was removed from its original site at Houston to Live Oak in 1868 because of the latter's superior geographical position and railroad . . . — Map (db m125973) HM
Georgia (Athens-Clarke County), Athens — 029-4 — Clarke County
Clarke County, created by Act of Dec. 5, 1801 from Jackson County, originally contained Oconee and part of Madison and Greene Counties. It was named for Gen. Elijah Clarke who came to Wilkes County, Ga., from N.C. in 1774 and fought through Ga., . . . — Map (db m36187) HM
Georgia (Atkinson County), Pearson — 002-1 — Atkinson Court House>>>----- >
Atkinson County was created by an act of the Georgia legislature in 1917, out of lands previously in Clinch and Coffee Counties. The county was organized Jan. 1, 1918. The first officers were J.W. Roberts, Ordinary; Wiley M. Sumner, Clerk . . . — Map (db m106274) HM
Georgia (Bacon County), Alma — 003-1 — Bacon County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature July 27, 1914, is named for Augustus O. Bacon, four times U.S. Senator, who died in office Feb. 15, 1914. An expert on Mexican affairs, his death was a great loss coming at a time of critical relations . . . — Map (db m24292) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Homer — 006-7B — Banks County
Banks County was created by Act of Dec. 11, 1858 from Franklin and Habersham Counties. It was named for Dr. Richard Banks (1784-1850), whose reputation as physician and surgeon extended over north Ga. and S.C. Especially noted for treating Indians . . . — Map (db m40684) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-43 — Bartow County
Originally Cass, Bartow County was created by Act of Dec. 3, 1832 from Cherokee County. The name was changed Dec. 6, 1861 to honor Gen. Francis S. Bartow (1816-1861), Confederate political leader and soldier, who fell mortally wounded at the First . . . — Map (db m40585) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Emerson — 008-4 — Emerson
Named for Joseph Emerson Brown, Gov. of Ga., 1857-1865, U.S. Senator, 1880-1891. Known as Stegall's Station prior to 1889; site of the Bartow Iron Works. May 20, 1864: Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's forces camped here after retreating from Cassville and . . . — Map (db m10907) HM
Georgia (Ben Hill County), Fitzgerald — 009-2 — Ben Hill County
Ben Hill County, created by Act of July 31, 1906 from Irwin and Wilcox Counties, was named for Benjamin Harvey Hill (1823-1882), “one of America’s greatest orators.” A staunch supporter of the administration in the Confederate Senate, . . . — Map (db m40263) HM
Georgia (Berrien County), Nashville — 010-3 — Berrien County
Berrien County, created by Act of Feb. 25, 1856, was named for John MacPherson Berrien, “the American Cicero,” who was born Aug. 23, 1781 and died Jan. 1, 1856. He was Judge of the Eastern Circuit, U.S. Senator and U.S. Attorney General. . . . — Map (db m40122) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-9 — Bibb County
Bibb County was created by Act of Dec. 9, 1822 from Houston, Jones, Monroe and Twiggs Counties. It was named for Dr. William Wyatt Bibb (1781-1820) of Elbert County. Dr. Bibb, physician, legislator, Congressman, Senator, was appointed Governor of . . . — Map (db m44892) HM
Georgia (Bleckley County), Cochran — 012-1 — Bleckley County
This County, created by an act of the Georgia Legislature July 30, 1912, is named for Chief Justice Logan E. Bleckley, of the Georgia Supreme Court, one of the greatest jurists in the history of this State. Born in Rabun County in 1827, he . . . — Map (db m47553) HM
Georgia (Brantley County), Nahunta — 013-1 — Brantley County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature Aug. 14, 1920, is named for Benjamin D. Brantley. It is said that the old B. & W. Railroad, which was partly destroyed, marked the most southern point of advance of Sherman's Army. Among the first . . . — Map (db m24045) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Pembroke — 015-1 — Bryan County
This County created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 19, 1793, is named for Jonathan Bryan, Revolutionary patriot and member of the Executive Council in 1777. The "lost town" of Hardwick on the Ogeechee River was the first temporary County Site. Laid . . . — Map (db m14952) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-6 — Burke County
Burke County, an original county, was created by the Const. of Feb. 5, 1777, from Creek Cession of May 30, 1733. In 1758, it had been organized as the Parish of St. George. Originally, it contained parts of Jefferson, Jenkins and Screven Counties. . . . — Map (db m7856) HM
Georgia (Butts County), Jackson — 018-1 — Butts County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature December 24, 1825, is named for Capt. Sam Butts killed in the Indian War of 1814 at the Battle of Chalibbee. At Indian Springs, now a State Park, were signed the Treaties with the Creeks giving Georgia . . . — Map (db m21385) HM
Georgia (Butts County), Jackson — Sylvan Grove Plantation
Sylvan Grove Hospital site was originally part of a large colonial cotton plantation known as Sylvan Grove Plantation. This plantation was settled in 1817 by Williams Buttrill, Revolutionary soldier and aide to General George Washington. He was the . . . — Map (db m103191) HM
Georgia (Candler County), Metter — 021-1 — Candler County
Candler County was created by an Act of the Georgia Legislature July 17, 1914, out of portions of Bulloch, Emanuel and Tattnall Counties, and named for Gov. Allen D. Candler (1834-1910). Gov. Candler is famed for the preservation of Colonial and . . . — Map (db m18229) HM
Georgia (Carroll County), Whitesburg — Council Bluffs Treaty11 December 1821
Here at the home of Creek Chief Wm McIntosh, a treaty establishing a new boundary between the CHEROKEE and CREEK Indian Nations was drafted and signed. The north boundary was later used in the first survey of Carroll County in 1826-27. — Map (db m12547) HM
Georgia (Charlton County), Folkston — 024-9 — Trader's Hill (Fort Alert)
About 2 miles East, on this road, is the site of "Fort Alert, usually called Trader's Hill." Established in the 18th century, and defended by a stockade garrisoned by U.S. Troops, Trader's Hill was a refuge for settlers during the Indian Wars. At . . . — Map (db m14472) HM
Georgia (Charlton County), Moniac — 94 A-3 — Ellicott's Mound
Ellicott’s Mound, 5 miles north, at the head of the St. Marys River, was erected February 27, 1800, to mark the boundry between the United States and Spanish Florida, as set fourth in the Treaty of 1795 with Spain. Major Andrew Ellicott noted . . . — Map (db m9186) HM
Georgia (Chattahoochee County), Cusseta — 026-4 — Chattahoochee County
Chattahoochee County, created by Act of February 13, 1854, was cut off from Muscogee and Marion Counties. It was named for the Chattahoochee River. Its courthouse, constructed in 1854, was built of select heart lumber from the Long Leaf Pine by . . . — Map (db m38841) HM
Georgia (Chattooga County), Summerville — 027-2 — Chattooga County
Chattooga County was created by Act of Dec. 28, 1838 from Floyd and Walker Counties. It was named for the river which flows through the county, called Chattooga by the Cherokee Indians. Sequoyah (George Guess or Gist), inventor of the Cherokee . . . — Map (db m16374) HM
Georgia (Cherokee County), Canton — 028-2 — Cherokee County
Created December 3, 1832, from Cherokee Indian Lands, and named in memory of the Cherokees. Early settlers tried to start silk production, but were not successful, and today there remains no trace of this except Canton, hopefully named for the . . . — Map (db m21824) HM
Georgia (Clay County), Fort Gaines — 030-1 — Clay County
This County created by Act of the Legislature Feb. 16, 1854, is named for Henry Clay, famous statesman who died in 1852. Near Fort Gaines, the County Site, stood the actual Fort built in 1816 for defense in the Creek Indian Wars and named for Gen. . . . — Map (db m47761) HM
Georgia (Clinch County), Homerville — 032-1 — Clinch Court House
Clinch County was created by an Act of the Legislature approved Feb. 14, 1850 out of lands formerly in Lowndes and Ware Counties and was named for General Duncan L. Clinch, a hero of the War of 1812 and the Indian wars. At the first election held . . . — Map (db m23848) HM
Georgia (Cobb County), Marietta — 033-37 — Cobb County
Created December 3, 1832, and named for Judge Thomas W. Cobb, a former U.S. Senator, Marietta was named for his wife. Fertile lands gave impetus to farming; ample water power encouraged industries. People from further south sought Marietta as . . . — Map (db m1660) HM
Georgia (Cobb County), Smyrna — Smyrna’s First MayorJohn C. Moore — Aug. 16, 1830 - May 10, 1897 —
Ulysses S. Grant was President of the U.S., and the South was still suffering from the effects of abusive Reconstruction when Smyrna was first incorporated August 23, 1872. One theory is that in the post-war era, citizens feared the town would . . . — Map (db m17072) HM
Georgia (Colquitt County), Moultrie — 035-1 — Colquitt County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature February 25, 1856, is named for Hon. Walter T. Colquitt who had recently died. A famous lawyer and Methodist preacher, he served in Congress in 1839-40 and 1842-43, and in the Senate from 1843 to ‘48. . . . — Map (db m40202) HM
Georgia (Cook County), Adel — 037-1 — Cook County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature July 30, 1918, is named for Gen. Philip Cook who fought in the States and Seminole Wars. He served in Congress from 1872 to '82, was Secretary of State for Georgia 1890-94 and 1898-1918. He served as . . . — Map (db m40446) HM
Georgia (Coweta County), Newnan — 038-4 — Coweta County
Coweta, an original county, was created by Acts of June 9, 1825 and Dec. 11, 1826 from Creek cessions of Jan. 24, 1826 and Mar. 31, 1826. It was named Coweta to perpetuate the fame of the head chief of the Coweta Towns, Gen. William McIntosh, . . . — Map (db m10497) HM
Georgia (Crisp County), Cordele — 040-6 — Crisp County
Crisp County was created by Act of Aug. 17, 1905 from Dooly County. It was named for Charles Frederick Crisp (1845-1896), Georgia lawyer, judge, Congressman, who was born in Sheffield, England, of actor parents touring the British Isles. Judge Crisp . . . — Map (db m53210) HM
Georgia (Dade County), Trenton — 041-1 — Dade County
Often called the “State of Dade,” because, as legend has it, the county seceded from the Union ahead of Georgia, and only returned to the Union July 4, 1945. Created December 25, 1837, and named for Major Francis Langhorne Dade, . . . — Map (db m57731) HM
Georgia (Dodge County), Eastman — 045-1 — Dodge County
This County created by Act of the Legislature Oct. 26, 1870, is named for William E. Dodge, a New York lumberman who owned large areas of the forest lands and who persuaded Congress to remove taxation from “the great staple of our . . . — Map (db m57197) HM
Georgia (Dooly County), Vienna — 046-1 — Dooly County
This County, created by Acts of the Legislature May 15 & Dec. 24, 1821, is named for Col. John Dooly of Revolutionary fame who was murdered in his home by Tories in 1780. The original County Site was at Berrien on the Flint River in 1823, the name . . . — Map (db m53224) HM
Georgia (Dougherty County), Albany — 047-1 — Dougherty County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature December 15, 1853, is named for Charles Dougherty of Athens, noted ante-bellum lawyer and jurist and strong advocate of states rights. In the Creek War in 1836 the Indians were driven out at the Battle . . . — Map (db m40792) HM
Georgia (Effingham County), Springfield — 051-1 — Effingham County
This is one of the eight original Counties created by the Georgia Constitution in 1777 and is named for Lord Effingham who was an ardent supporter of Colonial Rights. By Act of Feb. 26, 1784, the first County Site was located at Tuckasee-King near . . . — Map (db m7505) HM
Georgia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — 56-1 — Fayette County
This County, created by Acts of the Legislature May 15 and December 24, 1821, is named for the Marquis de LaFayette, famous French General who came to this country to fight under General George Washington in the Revolutionary War. After returning to . . . — Map (db m42534) HM
Georgia (Fulton County), Campbellton — Site of the Campbell County Court House
Where, in June 1867 the widow of Captain T.C. Glover called a reunion of the survivors of Company A, 21st Georgia, C.S.A. who agreed to hold annual meetings. — Map (db m21432) HM
Georgia (Fulton County), Hapeville — Hapeville, Georgia
Hapeville is situated on the Central Railroad of Georgia, eight miles from Atlanta, upon a water-shed extending from Atlanta to Macon. When chartered on September 16, 1891, Hapeville was considered the most attractive suburban town around Atlanta . . . — Map (db m10906) HM
Georgia (Fulton County), Sandy Springs — The History of the City of Sandy Springs, Georgia
Sandy Springs, Georgia, the unincorporated community just north of Atlanta, began a 30-year campaign for incorporation when the City of Atlanta tried to annex the area in the 1970s. The Committee for Sandy Springs formed in 1975 to incorporate Sandy . . . — Map (db m53430) HM
Georgia (Glascock County), Gibson — 062-1 — Glascock County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 19, 1857, is named for Gen. Thomas Glascock who served in the War of 1812 and the Seminole War. He was a Speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives and a Member of Congress from 1835 to . . . — Map (db m55549) HM
Georgia (Glynn County), Brunswick — 063-21 — Glynn County
Glynn County, one of the eight original Counties of Georgia, was organized under the 1777 Constitution of the State of Georgia. It was named in honor of John Glynn, a member of the British House of Commons who defended the cause of the American . . . — Map (db m12226) HM
Georgia (Grady County), Cairo — 065-1 — Grady County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature Aug. 17, 1905, is named for Henry W. Grady, nationally famous editor and “silver tongued orator” of the New South. Born in Athens, Ga., in 1850 and educated at the Universities of Georgia & . . . — Map (db m27123) HM
Georgia (Greene County), Greensboro — 066-1 — Greene County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature Feb. 3, 1786, is named for Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene, the strategist who ranked second only to Gen. Washington. Born in Rhode Island in 1742, he died at his Georgia plantation in 1786. Seven miles . . . — Map (db m42718) HM
Georgia (Haralson County), Tallapoosa — 071-3 — Historic Tallapoosa
Tallapoosa was a place of great ceremonial importance to the Indians. Here in 1826 settlers discovered “Charles Town,” an Indian Village named for one of their great warriors. Several Indian trails intersected here and the Choctaw, Creek . . . — Map (db m11142) HM
Georgia (Harris County), Pine Mountain — Chipley - Pine Mountain, Georgia
Chipley was incorporated on December 9, 1882, following the extension of the Columbus and Rome Railroad one mile north of the Village of Hood. Old Hood was the predecessor of Chipley. Chipley was named after Colonel W. D. Chipley, a partner in the . . . — Map (db m59012) HM
Georgia (Irwin County), Ocilla — 077-1A — Irwin County
This County, created by Acts of the Legislature December 15, 1818 and December 21, 1819, is named for Gov. Jared Irwin who served from 1806 to ‘09. He helped revised the State Constitution in 1789 and ‘98 and was famed for his uncompromising . . . — Map (db m40578) HM
Georgia (Jackson County), Braselton — 78-3 — The Braselton Family
In 1876 William H. Braselton, Sr. and his wife, Susan Hosch Braselton, established a 796-acre farm in western Jackson County . The Braseltons’ children, Henry, Green, John Oliver, Belle, and Lena , grew up working on the family farm, developing . . . — Map (db m24176) HM
Georgia (Jackson County), Hoschton — 78-1 — Hoschton Train Depot
The four Hosch brothers founded Hoschton in 1881 in the hope of influencing the proposed route of the Gainesville, Jefferson and Southern Railroad. In 1833 this depot was built on land donated by the brothers. The railroad transformed the town and . . . — Map (db m18272) HM
Georgia (Laurens County), Dublin — 087-2 — Laurens County
Laurens County was created by Act of Dec. 10, 1807 from Wilkinson County. Originally, it contained all of Pulaski and part of Johnson Counties. Among prominent residents of Laurens County were Gov. Geo. M. Troup and Gen. David Blackshear. It was . . . — Map (db m49538) HM
Georgia (Lee County), Leesburg — 088-4 — Lee County
Lee County was created by Acts of June 9, 1825 and Dec. 11, 1826 from Creek cessions of Jan. 24, 1826 and March 31, 1826. Originally, it contained all land in Randolph, Stewart, Quitman, Sumter, Terrell, Webster and part of Marion and Clay Counties. . . . — Map (db m40125) HM
Georgia (Lowndes County), Valdosta — 092-1 — Lowndes County
Lowndes County was created by an act of the Georgia Legislature December 23, 1825, from lands previously in Irwin County. It was named for William J. Lowndes, a South Carolina statesman. The first count officers commissioned May 29, 1826, were Henry . . . — Map (db m40166) HM
Georgia (McDuffie County), Thomson — 094-2 — McDuffie County
McDuffie County was created by Act of Oct. 18, 1870 from Columbia and Warren Counties. It was named for George McDuffie (1788-1851). Born in Columbia (now Warren County, Ga.), he became a political leader in S.C. He was a Maj. Gen. of Militia, . . . — Map (db m42688) HM
Georgia (Miller County), Colquitt — 100-1 — Miller County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature February 26, 1856, is named for Judge Andrew J. Miller who died in 1856. A Commander of the Oglethorpe Infantry, he served in the legislature for more than twenty years and was several times President . . . — Map (db m55508) HM
Georgia (Montgomery County), Mt. Vernon — 103-4 — Montgomery County
Montgomery County, created Dec. 19, 1793 out of Washington, originally contained all of Wheeler and Tattnall and parts of Treutlen, Toombs, Emanuel and Dodge Counties. It was named for Maj. Gen. Richard Montgomery (1736- 1775), "an early martyr to . . . — Map (db m21842) HM
Georgia (Morgan County), Madison — Madison
On the occasion of its Bicentennial, Morgan County placed this marker here to commemorate the community of Madison Named in honor of U.S. President James Madison, the town of Madison was established as the permanent seat of Morgan County . . . — Map (db m16233) HM
Georgia (Morgan County), Madison — The Town Commons
The Georgia Legislature initially designated 100 acres (Parts of Land Lots No.36, No.35, & No.23) for Madison’s establishment. The Justices of the Inferior Court subdivided the land to create a “publick” square as well as lots for sale . . . — Map (db m49234) HM
Georgia (Peach County), Fort Valley — 111-1 — Peach County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature July 18, 1924, is named for one of Georgia's leading crops, the Georgia Peach known throughout the nation and beyond. The famous Elberta Peach was developed in Georgia by Samuel B. Rumph and is grown . . . — Map (db m53097) HM
Georgia (Pickens County), Tate — 112-1 — Georgia Marble Company and the Village of Tate
The Georgia Marble Company began in 1884 as one of many small marble quarrying operations in the region. In 1905 Colonel Sam Tate became the company's president, continuing in that position until his death in 1938. Georgia Marble Company stone can . . . — Map (db m15019) HM
Georgia (Pierce County), Blackshear — 113-1 — Pierce County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature December 18, 1857, is named for Franklin Pierce, New Hampshire Democrat and fourteenth President of the United States, 1853 to `57. He was a General in the Mexican War. Blackshear, incorporated December . . . — Map (db m24037) HM
Georgia (Pike County), Zebulon — 114-2 — Pike County
Created by Act of Dec. 9, 1822, from Monroe County, Pike County originally contained part of Spalding, Upson and Lamar Counties. It was named for Zebulon Montgomery Pike (1779-1813), leader, in 1805, of an expedition to trace the Mississippi River . . . — Map (db m59609) HM
Georgia (Polk County), Cedartown — 115-1A — Polk County
Created December 20, 1851 and named for President James Knox Polk. Cedartown is fittingly named for the trees which flourish in this beautiful valley. The city is a railroad center, has a thriving textile industry, and a large paper mill. . . . — Map (db m35738) HM
Georgia (Polk County), Rockmart — 115-5 — Old Van Wert Polk County
County seat of Paulding when that county was created in 1832; inc. 1838. Named for Isaac Van Wert & John Paulding, two of the captors of Major Andre. Polk County was organized in 1851 from parts of Floyd and Paulding; this placed Van Wert in Polk . . . — Map (db m35778) HM
Georgia (Pulaski County), Hawkinsville — 116-1 — Pulaski County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature December 13, 1808, is named for Count Casimir Pulaski, Polish hero of the Revolutionary War who died fighting in Georgia and is buried in Savannah. Court was to be held at the home of Isham Jordan until . . . — Map (db m40329) HM
Georgia (Quitman County), Georgetown — 118-1 — Quitman County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 10, 1858, is named for Gen. John A. Quitman, soldier in the Mexican War, Governor of Mississippi and ardent advocate of States Rights. The County Site is named for Georgetown, D.C. Among the first . . . — Map (db m46586) HM
Georgia (Randolph County), Cuthbert — 120-9 — Randolph County
Randolph County was created by Act of Dec. 20, 1828 from Lee County. Originally Randolph County included all of what is now Stewart and Quitman and part of Terrell and Clay Counties. It was named for “John Randolph of Roanoke” . . . — Map (db m48626) HM
Georgia (Richmond County), Augusta — 121-27 — Richmond County
Originally designated as the Parish of St. Paul by the Act creating it in 1758, the name was changed in 1777 to Richmond County in honor of the Duke of Richmond, who, as a member of Parliament, was a zealous supporter of the American cause, . . . — Map (db m9706) HM
Georgia (Rockdale County), Conyers — 122-1 — Rockdale County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature October 18, 1870, is named for Rockdale Church, so called for the fine underlying granite strata. Conyers, the County Site, was incorporated in 1854 and named for a prominent physician. Smyrna Camp . . . — Map (db m35930) HM
Georgia (Screven County), Rocky Ford — 124-1 — First County Seat
Between 1765 and 1770 a group of settlers, mostly from North Carolina, settled and received grants for land in the vicinity of what is now Rockyford. Among these first settlers were, Benjamin Lanier, Lemuel Lanier, Valentine Hollingsworth, . . . — Map (db m13131) HM
Georgia (Seminole County), Donalsonville — City of Donalsonville
According to a map "Plan of Donalson" dated April 1889, the town was laid out by John Earnest Donalson. On December 8, 1897, a charter, signed by Governor William Yates Atkinson, was granted incorporating the town of Donalsonville. Officers . . . — Map (db m9858) HM
Georgia (Seminole County), Donalsonville — 125-1 — Seminole County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature July 8, 1920, is named for the Seminole Indians. Members of the Creek Confederacy, the Seminoles (meaning “separatist”) left the main body in Georgia and settled in Florida. After two bloody . . . — Map (db m55645) HM
Georgia (Spalding County), Griffin — 126-3 — Spalding County
Spalding County was created by Act of Dec. 20, 1851 from Fayette, Henry and Pike Counties. It was named for Thomas Spalding (1774-1851), native of Frederica. One of the earliest cotton and sugar cane planters in Georgia, he was a legislator, state . . . — Map (db m59619) HM
Georgia (Stephens County), Toccoa — 127-1 — Stephens County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature August 18, 1905, is named for Alexander Hamilton Stephens, Vice President of the Confederacy. A state legislator and Senator he was elected to Congress at 31, serving from 1843 to 1859. Elected to . . . — Map (db m58733) HM
Georgia (Stewart County), Richland — Historic Richland
First settled in 1827, Richland was named for the home district of several pioneer families from South Carolina. The community became a busy railroad junction when the Savannah. Americus and Montgomery, and the Columbus Southern rail lines met here . . . — Map (db m10152) HM
Georgia (Telfair County), McRae — 134-2 — Telfair County
Telfair County was created by Act of Dec. 10, 1807 from Wilkinson County. Originally, it contained parts of Coffee and Dodge Counties. It was named for Gov. Edward Telfair (1735- 1807). Born in Scotland, he settled in Savannah in 1766, was a staunch . . . — Map (db m23638) HM
Georgia (Tift County), Tifton — 137-1 — Tift County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature August 17, 1905, is officially named for Nelson Tift, well known businessman, legislator and Mayor of Albany. The organizers also had in mind his nephew Henry Harding Tift, who founded Tifton in 1872 . . . — Map (db m39993) HM
Georgia (Toombs County), Lyons — 138-1 — Toombs County
Toombs County was created by Act of Aug. 18, 1905 from Emanuel, Montgomery and Tattnall. It was named for Gen. Robert Augustus Toombs 1810-1885), of Wilkes County, Congressman and Senator. One of the chief organizers of the Confederate government, . . . — Map (db m18208) HM
Georgia (Treutlen County), Soperton — 140-3 — Treutlen County
Treutlen County was created by Act of Aug. 21, 1917 from Emanuel and Montgomery Counties. It was named for Gov. John Adam Treutlen (1726- 1782), "one of the foremost revolutionists." Elected Governor over Button Gwinnett in 1777, he was declared a . . . — Map (db m23644) HM
Georgia (Walton County), Monroe — 147-3 — James Monroe
This City of Monroe, settled in 1818 and incorporated Nov. 30, 1821, was named for James Monroe, fifth President. Born in Virginia in 1758 he fought in the Continental Army. He served in the Virginia legislature, in Congress and the Senate, and as . . . — Map (db m20718) HM
Georgia (Warren County), Warrenton — 149-1 — Warren County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 19, 1793, is named for Gen. Joseph Warren, Massachusetts Revolutionary hero killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. What is claimed to have been the first iron works and woolen mill in Georgia was . . . — Map (db m49372) HM
Georgia (Wheeler County), Alamo — 153-1 — Wheeler County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature Aug. 14, 1912, is named for Gen. Joseph Wheeler, famous Confederate Cavalry leader and Major General of Cavalry in the Spanish War. He twice saved Augusta from Kilpatrick's Union Cavalry, at Waynesboro, . . . — Map (db m23634) HM
Georgia (White County), Cleveland — 154-4 — Cleveland
When White County was formed in 1857, Mt. Yonah was selected as the County-seat. The majority of its residents wished to rename it Sheltonville for William H. Shelton, who sponsored the formation of the new county. Shelton asked that it be named . . . — Map (db m43702) HM
Georgia (Wilcox County), Abbeville — 156-1 — Wilcox County
This County was created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 22, 1857. Georgia Archives show that it was named for Capt. John Wilcox though some authorities believe it was named for his son Gen. Mark Wilcox, state legislator and one of the founders of the . . . — Map (db m40104) HM
Georgia (Wilkinson County), Irwinton — 158-7 — Wilkinson County
This County was created by Acts of the Legislature May 11, 1803 and Dec. 7, 1805. It is named for James Wilkinson, Revolutionary General, and formed from part of the lands acquired from the Creeks by the Treaty of Fort Wilkinson (on the Oconee) at . . . — Map (db m41869) HM
Georgia (Worth County), Sylvester — 159-1 — Worth County
This County created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 20, 1853 is named for Maj. Gen. Wm. J. Worth of Mexican War fame under whose command served Maj. William A. Harris, a leader in the organization of the new County. Among the first County Officers . . . — Map (db m40109) HM
Hawaii (Kauai County), Poipu — 7 — Sacred Fishing Grounds
The bay before you—named Keoneloa (or ‘the long sand’)—is the site of one of the oldest known Hawaiian occupation on Kaua‘i, a temporary fishing camp, dating to A.D. 220–660. The Hawaiians divided each island into . . . — Map (db m12807) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Abraham Lincoln and Idaho
1809 – 2009 President Abraham Lincoln created Idaho Territory, appointed its first officers and judges and addressed Congress about Idaho in 1863 and 1864. He considered Idaho issues in the White House on the afternoon that he was shot and . . . — Map (db m126722) HM
Illinois (Cook County), Chicago — 3 — Old Town and The Great Fire (#3)
On October 7, 1871, the Great Fire of Chicago started on the south side of the city and continued north. As the fire approached Old Town, the bells of St. Michael’s Church began to toll. The walls of church survived, but the interior was destroyed. . . . — Map (db m47605) HM
Illinois (Cook County), Chicago — 1 — Old Town’s Entrepreneur Spirit (#1)
From 1870 through the 1800s, Henry Piper, one of Old Town’s early entrepreneurs, operated a successful bakery in a narrow alley. Today, the building at Wells and North is known as Piper’s Alley. The existing house located at 1546 North Wells was . . . — Map (db m47609) HM
Illinois (Peoria County), Peoria — Schwab - Powell Buildingca. 1852 — Riverfront Visitor Center —
Known as Powell Press Building This building, the oldest Commercial structure on Peoria's Riferfront, was saved, moved, and restored by City of Peoria. — Map (db m9180) HM
Indiana (Dearborn County), Lawrenceburg — Dearborn County
Formed by proclamation of Indiana Territorial Governor William Henry Harrison March 7, 1803. Named in honor of Major General Henry Dearborn, Secretary of War. The third county to be formed, it was originally much larger. Its present boundaries . . . — Map (db m22103) HM
Indiana (Elkhart County), Goshen — 20.1966.1 — Indiana Territory Line
The boundary between Indiana and Michigan territories was established in 1805. Just before Indiana became a state in 1816, the line was moved ten miles north to give Indiana frontage on Lake Michigan. — Map (db m44849) HM
Indiana (Fountain County), Attica — Davis Township - Maysville1825 - 1935
Platted 1832 Addition 1836 Population in 1840 - - 800 First polling place in Davis Township. Many years Largest Town South of Chicago. — Map (db m9874) HM
Indiana (Fountain County), Covington — Fountain County Clerk's BuildingFountain County Art Council
Historic Landmarks of Fountain County Award Presented to Fountain County Art Council for Restoration and Preservation of Fountain County Clerk's Building Built 1842. — Map (db m21155) HM
Indiana (Franklin County), Brookville — 24.1992.1 — Brookville Historic District
Platted 1808 along Whitewater River, Brookville was an important entry point to interior lands opened to settlement. The district's concentration of well-preserved buildings reflects the city's continued prosperity. Brookville Historic District . . . — Map (db m44697) HM
Indiana (Franklin County), Brookville — 24.1966.1 — Brookville, Franklin County — ( Platted 1808 ) —
. . . — Map (db m44695) HM
Indiana (Hamilton County), Noblesville — 29.2005.1 — Conner Street Historic District
Hamilton County formed 1823. Noblesville platted 1823, selected county seat 1824, incorporated 1851. Located east of downtown commercial area; boundaries are Conner and Logan streets (east and west) and 10th and 17th streets (north and south). . . . — Map (db m240) HM
Indiana (Harrison County), Corydon — Bell Predates the Civil War
In loving memory David J. Dukes, M.D. July 16, 1927 — June 15, 1991 Remembered for his love of music, church, sailing, family, and his fellow man. The bell predates the Civil War and may have been in the First Methodist Church around . . . — Map (db m9686) HM
Indiana (Harrison County), Corydon — 31.1962.2 — First State Capital
Corydon became the first state capital of Indiana in 1816. The first constitution was drawn up and the first sessions of the state legislature and supreme court convened here. — Map (db m9712) HM
Indiana (Harrison County), Corydon — 31.1948.1 — Indiana Capitol
The Capital of Indiana Territory was moved to Corydon from Vincennes, 1813. This building became first State Capitol, 1816. Offices were moved to Indianapolis in 1825. — Map (db m9626) HM
Indiana (Hendricks County), Danville — 32.2000.1 — Danville’s Main Street Historic District
(Side One) Residential district bounded by Main, East, Cross, and Marion streets. Nineteenth and early twentieth century homes reflect social and economic diversity of residents, including town’s prominent citizens. Listed in National Register of . . . — Map (db m237) HM
Indiana (Henry County), Knightstown — The National Road — West
Knightstown—first town platted on National Road after survey, 1827—named after noted surveyor Jonathan Knight. Home of American Communications Network founded, in 1966, to preserve and perpetuate the “Ideals that built . . . — Map (db m139247) HM
Indiana (Huntington County), Huntington — Samuel Huntington1731 -- 1796 — Signer of the Declaration of Independence —
This city, township and county were named for Samuel Huntington, signer of the Declaration of Independence and important political figure in the Revolutionary War era. Records indicate the name was given by Elias Murray, Huntington's nephew, when he . . . — Map (db m71299) HM
Indiana (Lake County), Crown Point — The Old Lake County Courthouse, 1878
The Old Courthouse has been, since its erection in 1878, a landmark in Lake County, Indiana. Construction of the central portion, including the clock tower, began with 500,000 hand-kilned bricks from the Henry Wise Brickyard in Crown Point, . . . — Map (db m27806) HM
Indiana (Madison County), Anderson — Public Square
This Public Square was part of Chief Anderson's Delaware Indian Village. In 1827, thirty acres were donated to Madison County by John and Salley Berry to relocate the county seat from Pendleton to Anderson. The remaining acreage was sold by the . . . — Map (db m232) HM
Indiana (Newton County), Kentland — 56.1966.1 — State Line Survey
In 1821 the Indiana-Illinois state line was surveyed by General John Tipton for Indiana and Samuel McClintoc for Illinois. They ran the line and marked each mile of it from Vincennes to Lake Michigan. — Map (db m64156) HM
Indiana (Noble County), Albion — 57.1999.1 — Noble County Seat / Noble County Courthouse
Noble County formed by General Assembly 1836, named after James Noble first US Senator from Indiana. County seats Sparta 1836, Augusta, 1837, Port Mitchell 1844. Center later named Albion selected 1846 as county seat in runoff election. Arrival of . . . — Map (db m3387) HM
Indiana (Owen County), Spencer — 60.1997.1 — Owen County Courthouse
Owen County formed by General Assembly, 1819. Spencer selected county seat, 1820. Neoclassical building designed by Jesse T. Johnson, Indianapolis and built by Christian Kanzler & Son, Evansville (1910-1911),was second courthouse on land donated by . . . — Map (db m5088) HM

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May. 30, 2020