Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Search Results

493 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 293
 
Babenberger Stadtthor - Babenberg City Gate Marker - wide view image, Touch for more information
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 15, 2017
Babenberger Stadtthor - Babenberg City Gate Marker - wide view
Austria, Wien (Innenstadt), Vienna — Babenberger Stadtthor - Babenberg City Gate
Hier stand zur Zeit der Babenberger ein Stadtthor.

-

(English translation:)At the time of the Babenbergs, a city gate stood here. — Map (db m144516) HM

Austria, Wien (Innenstadt), Vienna — Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
Erster Vorschlag für eine Akademie der Wissenschaften in Wien durch Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz 1646 - 1716 Philosoph, Mathematiker, Physiker, Theologe, Geologe, Techniker, Philologe, Jurist, Historiker und . . . — Map (db m144508) HM
Austria, Wien (Innenstadt), Vienna — Ulrich Zwingli
. . . — Map (db m144505) HM
New Brunswick (Charlotte County), Bayside — A Checkered History / Une historie mouvementée
English: In 1984, the United States Congress designated Saint Croix Island an international historic site in recognition of the historical significance of the Island to the United States and Canada. The majestic Saint Croix . . . — Map (db m144503) HM
New Brunswick (Charlotte County), Bayside — A French Colony in Acadie / Une colonie française en Acadie
English: ”Having found no place more suitable than this island... Sieur de Monts… allowed me to draw up the plan of our settlement." Seventy-nine men, including noblemen, artisans, labourers, Catholic and . . . — Map (db m144499) HM
New Brunswick (Charlotte County), Bayside — A Place to Settle / Un endroit où s’établir
English: Sieur de Monts named the island Saint Croix Island, and Champlain recorded that: "The island is covered with fir, birch, maple, and oak. It is naturally well located... and is easy to fortify... We considered this the . . . — Map (db m144498) HM
New Brunswick (Charlotte County), Bayside — A Winter of Despair / Un hiver de désespoir
English: ”It was difficult to know the country without having wintered there... Winter came upon us sooner than we had expected..." Could you survive a winter on Saint Croix Island if... • dangerous ice cut you . . . — Map (db m144501) HM
New Brunswick (Charlotte County), Bayside — In Champlain’s Footsteps / Sur les traces de Champlain
English: The precise mapping of Acadie in the 17th century was the work of one individual — Samuel de Champlain. Between May 1604 and August 1605, travelling by barque, pinnace, canoe or on foot, Champlain surveyed and . . . — Map (db m144500) HM
New Brunswick (Charlotte County), Bayside — Moving on / Le déménagement
English: "In order to escape the cold and dreadful winter we experienced on Saint Croix Island, Sieur de Monts decided to move the settlement to another location. Having… found no port that was acceptable to us... we outfitted . . . — Map (db m144502) HM
New Brunswick (Charlotte County), Bayside — Saint Croix Island International Historic Site / Lieu historique international de l'Île Sainte-Croix
English: Welcome On Saint Croix Island in 1604, French nobleman-courtier Pierre Dugua Sieur de Monts established a settlement. This outpost was the first attempt by the French at year-round colonization in the territory they . . . — Map (db m144495) HM
New Brunswick (Charlotte County), Bayside — The River Flows On... / La rivière poursuit son cours...
English: Samuel de Champlain, explorer and geographer on Sieur de Monts' expedition, recorded in late June 1604 that: ”...we entered a river... wherein...we found two islands — one very small and near the western . . . — Map (db m144496) HM
New Brunswick (Charlotte County), Bayside — Where Two Worlds Met / Rencontre de deux mondes
English: the Micmac, Maliseet, and Passamaquoddy hunters and traders provided a commercial lifeline for Sieur de Monts' colony. Their first-hand knowledge of the territory allowed these entrepreneurs to control the supply of furs. . . . — Map (db m144497) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Moser River — Moser River Veterans Memorial
In memory of those who gave their lives for their country 1914-1918 Basil Atkins • George Englehutt • Courtney Hull • Arthur MacDonald Guy Smith • Harry Smith • Leonard Smith • Stuart Smith 1939-1945 Wallace Barnard • Walter Hillier • Baxter . . . — Map (db m144475) WM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — A Memorial to Adam Carr Bell 1847-1912
Born in Pictou, here he was raised and lived his adult years. Educated in the New Glasgow Schools, Sackville (Mount Allison) Academy, Glasgow University Scotland. Public Servant, Politician, Pharmacist, Sportsman, Farmer, Horse Breeder. . . . — Map (db m144796) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — A Memorial to the Ship Building Industry
Into the East River at New Glasgow between 1821 and 1918 were launched some two hundred and ten sailing ships of 100 to 1400 tons burthen, built by native workmen from native materials. The locally owned, commanded and manned vessels moved . . . — Map (db m144793) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Bell's Corner
This area of Downtown New Glasgow was known as Bell's Corner for well over a century. Basil Bell (chemist, teacher and entrepreneur) constructed this architecturally sound stone home and store (to your left) in the mid 1840's. He and his wife would . . . — Map (db m144797) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Captain George R. McKenzie"Father of Pictou County Shipbuilding"
”One of New Glasgow’s most interesting and notable persons is George Rogers McKenzie. During his lifetime he was a builder of ships, deep water captain, a master mariner and a politician.” —Stories from Pictou County’s . . . — Map (db m144795) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Carmichael Park
The land upon which this park is situated was given to the Town of New Glasgow by James William Carmichael, Esq. on the Twenty-fourth day of November Eighteen Hundred and Ninety — Map (db m144802) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Glasgow Scotland
This parcel of land in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia deeded to the City of Glasgow, Scotland, Aug. 6, 1975, during the visit of the Honourable Peter T. McCann, Lord Provost of the City of Glasgow, to officiate at the Festival of Tartans on the occasion . . . — Map (db m144804) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Industrial Centre Lofts
You are standing beside the Mae MacGillivray Building, which was renovated in 2014 by MacGillivray Properties Limited. The loft apartments have an industrial theme rooted in the County's history of coal, steel and shipbuilding. A 1916 book Pictou . . . — Map (db m144806) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Johnny MilesInspirational Trail and Memorial
This memorial and activity trail recognizes the inspiration of Johnny C. Miles (1905 to 2003). Johnny grew up in Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia and became an internationally known sports figure following his 1926 and 1929 wins of the Boston Marathon. He . . . — Map (db m144803) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — New GlasgowYour Shore to Relax & Reconnect
The community that was to become New Glasgow was settled in 1784 by Deacon Thomas Fraser. By 1809 the Town was named after Old Glasgow in Scotland and incorporated in 1875. A strong entrepreneurial spirit was evident even in 1809 when the first . . . — Map (db m144794) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — New Glasgow D-Day Memorial
. . . — Map (db m144879) WM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — New Glasgow Heritage
New Glasgow is a scenic riverside town of 9,455 residents, which serves as the commercial-service centre for northern Nova Scotia with a rich multi-cultural mosaic. Founded by Scottish settlers in 1784, the town was named after Glasgow, Scotland and . . . — Map (db m144801) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — New Glasgow Town BellNew Glasgow flourish
This bell, belonging to the Town of New Glasgow, was refurbished and a bell tower was constructed as part of the New Glasgow Downtown Revitalization Project - Recreating the Experience, in 2009. The bell was originally manufactured and supplied . . . — Map (db m144799) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Normandy Branch 34The Royal Canadian Legion
Donated to the citizens of the Town of New Glasgow in memory of our fallen comrades Normandy Br 34 The Royal Canadian Legion October 5 • 1980 — Map (db m144880) WM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Rev. James Drummond MacGregor, D.D.
In grateful memory of The Rev James Drummond MacGregor, D.D. Born at Comrie, Perthshire, Scotland, 1759. Died at East River, Pictou, 1830. Pioneer Minister of the Gospel in Eastern Nova Scotia, where he labored with Apostolic zeal for 43 years. . . . — Map (db m144800) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Stone Lion, c. 1891John A. Wilson — 1876-1954 —
This likeness of a lion was sculpted by John A. Wilson in 1891 at the age of 15. Two others of its kind are known to exist, one here at the Carmichael Stewart House Museum and the other at the Lionstone Inn, Pictou. This particular statue was . . . — Map (db m144805) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Stone Lion, c. 1902John A. Wilson — 1876-1954 —
This likeness of a lion was sculpted by John A. Wilson in 1902 at the age 26. Two others of its kind are known to exist, one here at the Carmichael Stewart House Museum and the other at the Lionstone Inn, Pictou. Wilson, a New Glasgow native, was . . . — Map (db m144807) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — The First Church
The First Church in East Pictou was built on this site in 1787. Made of logs, it served the Lower Settlement East River Presbyterian Congregation for 16 years until 1803. From this beginning other Congregations developed in the East Pictou rural and . . . — Map (db m144791) HM
Nova Scotia (Pictou County), New Glasgow — Viola DesmondEducator, Entrepreneur, Human Rights Activist
Mrs. Viola Irene (Davis) Desmond was born on July 6, 1914 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, to James and Gwendolyn Davis. Viola was one of 15 siblings who grew up in and around the city area. After graduating from Bloomfield High School with excellent marks, . . . — Map (db m144798) HM
Ontario (Muskoka District), Baysville — Explorers of Muskoka & Haliburton
Following the War of 1812 expeditions traversed the wilderness between Lakes Simcoe and Muskoka and the Ottawa River, seeking a route across Upper Canada less open to attack than by the St. Lawrence and Lake Ontario. In 1819 Lieut. J.P. Catty, R.E., . . . — Map (db m144822) HM
Germany, Bavaria (Landkreis Schweinfurt), Gerolzhofen — Bürgerspital / Municipal Hospital
Das Bürgerspital "Zu unserer lieben Frau” geht zurück auf eine Stiftung des Schweinfurter Patrizierehepaares Rücker, die 1402 die ehemalige Stadtadelsburg der Zollner von der Hallburg der Stadt schenken. Ab 1580 lässt Bischof . . . — Map (db m144469) HM
Guatemala, San Marcos (Municipality de San José Ojetenám), San José Ojetenám — Calle Desiderio Roblero GálvezPrograma de Reconciliación Nacional - PNR
Calle Desiderio Roblero Gálvez El Estado de Guatemala a través del PNR, como un reconocimeiento a este ilustre ciudadano, víctima del Enfrentamiento Armado Interno, por su invaluable lucha para la búsqueda de la paz, concordia y . . . — Map (db m144871) HM
India, Maharashtra (Aurangabad District), Ajanta — Cave No. 1 / गुफा क़. 1
This is one of the finest monasteries (35.7 X 27.6 m) of its kind and no other monastery at Ajanta has been so handsomely ornamented. The Mahayana monastery consists of an open courtyard, verandah, a hypostylar hall, sanctum with an antechamber . . . — Map (db m144465) HM
India, National Capital Territory of Delhi (Central Delhi District), New Delhi — Diwan-i-Khas
Diwan-i-Khas also known as 'Shah Mahal' was the Hall of Private Audience used by the Emperor for receiving selected courtiers and visitors.

It consists of a rectangular central chamber, surrounded by series of arches rising from piers. The . . . — Map (db m144850) HM

India, National Capital Territory of Delhi (Central Delhi District), New Delhi — Naubat Khana
The Naubat or Naggar Khana (Drum House) stands at the entrance to the palatial complex. In its days of glory, musicians from the Naubat Khana announced the arrival of the Emperor or other prominent dignitaries at the court of the public . . . — Map (db m144852) HM
India, Uttar Pradesh (Agra District), Agra — The Taj Mahal
The Taj Mahal a marvel on marble was built by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in commemoration of his favourite wife, Empress Mumtaz Mahal. Shah Jahan married Arjumand Bano Bagum (Mumtaz Mahal), grand daughter of I'timad-Ud- Daula, the Wazir of . . . — Map (db m144748) HM
Mexico, Ciudad de México, Ciudad de Mexico — Stela 12 of Piedras Negras
Estela 12 de Piedras Negras (Reproducción. El original se encuentra en el Museo Nacional de Arqueología y Etnología de Guatemala) Fue erigida por el Gobernante 7, quien nació en 750 d.C. durante la regencia del Gobernante 4. Aunque . . . — Map (db m144452) HM
Netherlands, North Holland, Amsterdam — " 'T Saligh Roemers Huys / The Delightful House of Roemer
"'T Saligh Roemers Huys wiens vloer betreden word, wiens dorpel is gesleten van Schilders, kunstenaers, van Sangers en Poëten" (Vondel, 1623)

In dit pand en in de aangranzende panden woonden en werkten den koopman-dichter . . . — Map (db m144476) HM

Netherlands, North Holland, Amsterdam — Auschwitzmonument (Spiegelmonument) / Auschwitz Monument (Mirror Monument)De moord op de joden uit Nederland / The Murder of the Dutch Jews
Een gedenkteken maken op de plaats waar de urn met as van de slachtoffers uit het concentratiekamp Auschwitz in de Nederlandse aarde rust, lijkt een onmogelijke taak. Hoe kan je een vorm vinden om een misdaad te gedenken waarvan je het gevoel hebi . . . — Map (db m144477) HM WM
Netherlands, North Holland, Amsterdam — Dr. Evert Van Dieren
hier woonde Dr. Evert Van Dieren Eerste Voorzitter A.G.G. 1861 1940

-

(English translation:) Here lived Dr. Evert Van Dieren (1861-1940), first president of the Amsterdam Medical Association. — Map (db m144504) HM

Netherlands, North Holland, Amsterdam — Gisèle
Von 1940 tot 2013 leefde en werkte hier de kunstenares Gisèle Ze bood onbaatzuchtig onderdak aan vervolgden van de naziterreur. In dit huis leeft haar geest verder.

-

(English . . . — Map (db m144474) HM

Netherlands, North Holland, Amsterdam — Taeke Ferwerda and Siebren van der Baan Memorial
In den nacht van twaalf September negentienhonderd vier en veertig werd het onschuldig bloed vergoten van Taeke Ferwerda sinds negentienhonderd dertien dienaar des Woords der Gereformeerde kerk te Amsterdam en stierf Siebren van der Baan . . . — Map (db m144479) WM
Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — A Perspective of Power — Moundville Archaeological Park —
Imagine a clan chief 800 years ago standing exactly where you are. It's possible he would see something resembling this artist's rendering. Larger mounds, like this one, dotted the plaza's perimeter, serving as elevated platforms for . . . — Map (db m144752) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — Earthlodge — Moundville Archaeological Park —
Before you is Mound V, a broad, low, rectangular platform that forms an apron to Mound B at your left. Until recently, scientists knew only that Mound V's function was somehow intimately tied to Mound B upon which the principal chief's house stood. . . . — Map (db m144777) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — Mound Arrangement — Moundville Archaeological Park —
At least 29 mounds were built and used as platforms for important structures at Moundville. Their rectangular arrangement, roughly aligned with the four directions around a central plaza, shows us that these people planned this site before they . . . — Map (db m144811) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — Mound B — Moundville Archaeological Park —
The mound in front of you probably once served as a platform for the principal chief's house. The noble who lived there was an extremely important political and religious figure. It is likely that this chief claimed to have divine relationships with . . . — Map (db m144808) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — Moundville Archaeological ParkAlabama Indigenous Mound Trail
I do not think in the Southern States there is a group of Mounds to compare to Moundville, in the arrangement and state of preservation of the mounds. - Clarence B. Moore, amateur archaeologist, 1910

Spanning more than 300 acres, . . . — Map (db m144745) HM

Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — Moundville Archaeological Park — Moundville Archaeological Park —
Welcome to Moundville Archaeological Park, the best preserved site of its kind in North America. At its height, Moundville was the largest and most powerful political and religious center in the Southeast. Nobles at Moundville ruled over thousands . . . — Map (db m144759) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — Politics and Power — Moundville Archaeological Park —
The mounds you see here were built in a very orderly arrangement over the course of about 100 years. Surrounding them was an immense wall constructed from tens of thousands of logs. How did the rulers harness the manpower and allegiance of the . . . — Map (db m144774) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — Politics and Power — Moundville Archaeological Park —
The mounds you see here were built in a very orderly arrangement over the course of about 100 years. Surrounding them was an immense wall constructed from tens of thousands of logs. How did the rulers harness the manpower and allegiance of the . . . — Map (db m144809) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — Protection and the Palisade — Moundville Archaeological Park —
Rival Mississippian chiefdoms constantly threatened one another. Warfare was a way of life for most men. By proving their valor militarily, warriors probably increased their overall status as they were promoted up through the ranks. One theory . . . — Map (db m144815) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Moundville — The CCC and Moundville — Moundville Archaeological Park —
The Civilian Conservation Corps was born during the turmoil of the Great Depression. Hundreds of thousands of young men were out of work, and wasteful exploitation of the environment had devoured millions of acres across America. In 1933, as part of . . . — Map (db m144813) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — The ColumnsSweet Homegrown Alabama
Opened in 1934, the third Madison County Courthouse was the home of these majestic limestone columns and for more than 50 years they stood in the square, after which they were carefully disassembled.

Garden volunteers Evelyn Lucas and Seth . . . — Map (db m144866) HM

Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — 1 — Capitol ParkTuscaloosa Civil Rights History Trail
As you look at the ruins of the former Alabama State Capitol, it may be difficult to realize that the building stood at the center of debates over freedom and liberty. Until the end of the Civil War, Alabama and Tuscaloosa were centers of . . . — Map (db m144856) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — 16 — First African Baptist ChurchTuscaloosa Civil Rights History Trail
First African Baptist Church played a central role in the fight for civil rights in Tuscaloosa because it was the home church of Rev. T. Y. Rogers, Jr., the most important local leader in the movement, and the primary site for mass protest . . . — Map (db m144855) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Honor Roll of Soldiers and Patriotsof the American Revolution — 1775       1783 —
who came to Tuscaloosa County Alabama

Robert Aiken • Isaac Jaudon Samuel Baker • Reuben Jones William Binion • Thomas Keates, Sr. Benjamin Blackburn • Daniel Lookingbill Benjamin Bruton • John Madison Thomas Clarke • Samuel . . . — Map (db m144863) WM

Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — 18 — Howard-Linton BarbershopTuscaloosa Civil Rights History Trail
In September 1952, Autherine Lucy's application to the University of Alabama was accepted. When she arrived on campus and the university officials discovered that she was African-American, they denied her admission. In 1955, following . . . — Map (db m144853) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Lynching in America / Lynching in Tuscaloosa County
Lynching in America

Thousands of African Americans were victims of lynching and racial violence in the United States between the Civil War and World War II. The lynching of African Americans during this era was a form of racial terrorism . . . — Map (db m144735) HM

Alaska (Fairbanks North Star Borough), Fairbanks — 83 — Gold Dredge No. 8Gold Stream Valley 1928 - 1959 — National Historic Mechancial Engineering Landmark —
Dredges were brought in to mine gold-bearing deposits in the Fairbanks mining district after 1920. This bucket-line or ladder dredge has 68 buckets, each with a capacity of 6 cubit feet. The bucket line was driven by a 150 horsepower motor that . . . — Map (db m144242) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — A Relict ForestNavajo National Monument
Before you lies a small tributary of the Tsegi Canyon watershed. A quaking aspen grove graces the canyon floor, while the north-facing cliff (right) offers shady habitat for towering Douglas-fir trees. Thriving here in this desert wilderness is . . . — Map (db m144450) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Big SagebrushArtemisia tridentata
It is not known if the prehistoric Indians of the canyons used this plant, but both Navajos and Hopis make medicine from it, to cure stomach-ache. The Navajos use it to cure colds and headache. — Map (db m144404) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Broadleaf YuccaYucca baccata
As with the narrowleaf yucca, all parts of this plant provided something for the Indians. They ate the fruit, and shredded and twisted the leaves into cord and rope. Soap comes from the crushed roots and is used as a shampoo in Navajo and Hopi . . . — Map (db m144395) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Douglas FirPseudotsuga taxifolia
Generations of Hopis have long travelled far from their arid, mesa-top homes to collect fir boughs and branches. Navajos also traded cut boughs to the Hopis in exchange for corn. Each culture requires fir neck-wreaths for the dancers of certain . . . — Map (db m144406) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Gambel OakQuercus gambelii
The most common oak in Navajoland has a hard, durable wood, which is still used for ax handles, weaving battens, and cradleboard hoops. The leafy branches are favored for shade ramadas in the summer. Solutions of root bark are used to dye wool and . . . — Map (db m144405) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Grizzlybear PricklypearOpuntia erinacea
The fruit of the pricklypear cactus is widely eaten by Southwestern Indians. It is picked with a forked stick or wooden tongs, and the spines are broken or burned off. It may be eaten fresh or dried. — Map (db m144403) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Mormon TeaEphedra viridis
This plant, when made into a brew, was a multipurpose medicine, prescribed for stomach trouble, kidney afflictions, venereal disease, and coughs. — Map (db m144407) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Pinyon PinePinus edulis
The nut of this little tree, eaten raw or roasted, is a favorite wild food of the Southwestern Indians. Prehistoric Indians used the pitch to fasten stone arrowheads and knives to wooden shafts and handles, and to repair broken pots. Navajos made . . . — Map (db m144399) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Rabbit BrushChrysothamnus nauseosus
Hopi Indians burn rabbit brush kindling with three other wood fuels in their ceremonial kivas. Slender, flexible stems are woven into basketry. Green dye comes from the inner bark, while early autumn flowers yield a yellow dye. The Hopis once . . . — Map (db m144448) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Roundleaf BuffaloberryShepherdia rotundifolia
Map (db m144398) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — ServiceberryAmelanchier utahensis
Serviceberry is one of the enduring "life medicines" of the Navajos, which insure their survival, health, and harmony. It is gathered to treat nausea, stomach problems, animal bites, and recovery from childbirth. It is also valued as a medicine in . . . — Map (db m144449) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — The Pygmy Conifer Forest - An Indian Store
This trail leads through vegetation typical of the plateaus of northern Arizona. Although the trees are small, they make up a true forest – the pinyon pine-juniper forest. The stunted trees and plants here may seem an unlikely source of food, . . . — Map (db m144397) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Shonto — Utah JuniperJuniperus osteosperma
This tree had many uses. Many of the roof beams in Betatakin are juniper. Fires were started with juniper fire-drills, the shredded bark was used for tinder, and the wood was used for fuel. The shredded bark also served as diaper pads, was braided . . . — Map (db m144396) HM
California (Alameda County), Piedmont — Corpus Christi ChurchAll Are Welcome
Corpus Christi parish was formally opened on November 24, 1929 as part of what was then the archdiocese of San Francisco. Masses were held in a cottage on St. James Drive until January 11, 1931, when a small church and rectory opened . . . — Map (db m144737) HM
California (Los Angeles County), Altadena — Zane Grey Estate

Zane Grey Estate 396 East Mariposa Street has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior 2002 — Map (db m144782) HM

California (Los Angeles County), Northridge — Lauretta Wasserstein Sculpture Garden“Post-Tension”
On January 17, 1994, Los Angeles and the surrounding region experienced a 6.7 magnitude earthquake centered in Northridge. To commemorate the rebuilding of the region and CSUN, we created the sculpture garden incorporating remnants of the . . . — Map (db m144546) HM
California (Los Angeles County), Pasadena — San Gabriel Mission Dam1821-1822
Built by Joseph Chapman (Jose El Ingles), a woodman from Maine, taken prisoner during a pirate raid near Santa Barbara in 1818. He also helped construct the new Plaza Church in Los Angeles, and in 1819-1820 he built a grist mill at Mission Santa . . . — Map (db m144860) HM
California (Monterey County), Big Sur — Cooper CabinAndrew Molera State Park
Andrew Molera State Park was once part of a Mexican land grant known as the Rancho El Sur. Though granted in 1834 to Juan Bautista Alvarado, later governor of the province, it was soon acquired by his uncle, J.B.R. Cooper, Cooper was a Monterey sea . . . — Map (db m144646) HM
California (Sacramento County), Sacramento — Historic Businesses 10th to 11th Streets, North
J. McCaw Wood and Coal Yard is the earliest known business to occupy the north side of R Street from 10th to 11th Streets. In 1917, the Sacramento Junk Company constructed a brick warehouse, occupying it until 1925 when W.P. Fuller Paint and . . . — Map (db m144846) HM
California (Sacramento County), Sacramento — Historic Businesses 11th to 12th Street, South
The south side of the 1100 block of R Street was home to a number of storage warehouses in the early 1900s. In 1907, a State warehouse and office occupied the existing three-story, brick warehouse on the southeast corner of 11th and R . . . — Map (db m144714) HM
California (Sacramento County), Sacramento — History of Southside ParkThen and Now
Beginning of the Southside Neighborhood: The City of Sacramento has always been susceptible to floods. In the 1800's, this site which is now Southside Park was swamp land and was used as dumping grounds. By the 1850's a levee was . . . — Map (db m144865) HM
California (Sacramento County), Sacramento — Theodore Judah
Determined to be the "pioneer railroad engineer of the Pacific coast,” Theodore Judah was the chief engineer for the Sacramento Valley Railroad line that was completed along R Street in 1856. It was the first commercial railroad line west . . . — Map (db m144848) HM
California (Sacramento County), Sacramento — Transportation by Water and Land
A symbolic bond developed between river transportation and agricultural interests that was both economic and social, and it endured well into the 20th century. The river transportation companies maintained regular contracts with Sacramento . . . — Map (db m144739) HM
California (Sacramento County), Sacramento — Western Pacific Railroad
In 1909, Western Pacific Railroad built a freight depot near the Sacramento waterfront and began rail service to R Street. The rail line ran on the back side of the buildings on the north side of R Street, parallel to Whitney Alley. The line . . . — Map (db m144712) HM
California (San Francisco City and County), San Francisco — Rammaytush
This marker stretches between 3rd and 4th Streets on the east side of King Street. At opposite ends are two identical Ramaytush plaques. In between are 104 mini-plaques, in two parallel rows, each with a known word in the Ramaytush language. . . . — Map (db m144410) HM
California (Yolo County), Davis — After a Fire, the City of Davis is Created
A disastrous fire on November 13, 1916 destroyed much of the two block long downtown business district. The fire started that morning near what is now the corner of G and 3rd Streets, and fierce north winds fanned the flames all day.

. . . — Map (db m144738) HM

California (Yolo County), Davis — First Train Arrives in Davisville
In 1864 it was determined that the Central Pacific Rail Road would extend eastward from Sacramento over the Donner Summit route to become part of the transcontinental rail line.

Planners for the California Pacific Rail Road Company decided to . . . — Map (db m144744) HM

California (Yolo County), Davis — SP Depot
Five years after the University Farm opened in 1908, this Mission Revival station was built by Southern Pacific to replace the original Davisville depot, which had served passengers since 1868. Listed in the National Register of Historic . . . — Map (db m144858) HM
Connecticut (Tolland County), Coventry — Coventry World War II Memorial
Roll Of Honor In Honor Of The Men And Women Of Coventry Who Served Our Country In World War II This Memorial Was Made Possible By The Citizens Of The Town Of Coventry ★ Merrick Aborn ★ Eugene F. Edgerson ★ John Jones . . . — Map (db m144520) WM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-124 — Pencader Presbyterian Church
On October 15, 1701, William Penn granted 30,000 acres of land to William Davies, David Evans, and William Willis "in behalf of themselves and Company of new Welsh Purchasers." Known as the Welsh Tract, this expansive holding attracted large numbers . . . — Map (db m144426) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NCC-234 — The Tilton Mansion
The Tilton Mansion was constructed in 1802 by the nation’s first Army Surgeon General, Dr. James Tilton (1745-1822). Throughout his lifetime Tilton advocated for increased hospital sanitation and was the founder and first President of The Medical . . . — Map (db m144389) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Acanthus mollisArtist's Acanthus
According to Dioscorides, the root was good for treating ruptures and convulsions. It was also used as a diuretic. — Map (db m144670) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Achillea millefoliumYarrow
Yarrow was one of the first herbs brought to America by the colonists. Its leaves were used to stop the flow of blood on cuts and bruises and to deaden the pain. — Map (db m144642) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Acorus calamusSweet Flag
The Penobscot tribe of Maine believed this plant to have protective powers; they chewed a piece of the aromatic root to ward off disease when traveling or used steam from the root to prevent illness. — Map (db m144624) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Anethum graveolensDill
Although used to flavor food, dill was also eaten to help calm upset stomachs and indigestion, especially in children. Seeds were used in pickling and to flavor vinegar. — Map (db m144643) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Apocynum cannabinumIndian Hemp
Native Americans used the stalk for fiber in the same way Europeans used their hemp plant, Cannabis sativa. Indian Hemp is superior, however, because it is stronger and lasts longer. This herb is poisonous. — Map (db m144567) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Artemisia abrotanumSouthernwood
Artemisia abrotanum hung in courtrooms was thought to stop the spread of disease. It was also used in kitchens to keep bad odors away. Pennsylvania Germans used southernwood in their pantries to repel ants. — Map (db m144638) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Artemisia absinthiumWormwood
This plant was spread across floors and put in between clothes in dressers to repel insects and moths. The plant was thought to prevent disease, as well as expel worms. — Map (db m144556) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Arum maculatumLords-and-Ladies
The juice, mixed with oil, stopped earaches and destroyed nasal polyps. It was also used to treat certain cancers and abortion. Drunk with wine, it was an aphrodisiac. The plant is injurious. — Map (db m144661) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Asarum canadenseWild Ginger
The Chippewa used this herb to season food and chewed the root to relieve indigestion. The Iroquois used the roots to preserve meats. — Map (db m144574) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Asclepias tuberosaButterfly Weed
This plant was one of the most important medicines of the Menomini. The pulverized root was used for cuts and wounds, and was mixed with other roots for additional cures. This herb is potentially toxic if taken internally. — Map (db m144617) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ballota nigraBlack Horehound
Dioscorides reported that the leaves were applied with salt to dog bites, with honey to clean ulcers, and that the ashes of the leaves repressed venereal warts. — Map (db m144666) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Baptistia tinctoriaWild Indigo
The Cherokee used the leaves and woody stem to make a blue die. The Mohegan bathed their cuts and wounds with an infusion of the plant. This entire herb is toxic. — Map (db m144568) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Calendula officinalisPot Marigold
Brought to America by the first colonists, pot marigolds were used to flavor and color stews and cheeses. The Plymouth colony also used the flowers to dye cloth. — Map (db m144640) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Calendula officinalisPot Marigold
The yellow dye from the fresh or dried petals was commonly used to color butter, cheeses and puddings. The petals were also used in ancient Rome as a substitute for the more expensive saffron in coloring soups, syrups and conserves. — Map (db m144648) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Calycanthus floridusCarolina Allspice
The Cherokee used the root of this herb to make a strong diuretic for urinary and bladder complaints. The seeds of this plant are poisonous. — Map (db m144619) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Camptotheca acuminataCamptotheca, Chinese Happy Tree
Known as the "cancer tree", Camptotheca contains the alkaloid camptothecin that is used to treat ovarian, colorectal, and small-cell lung cancers. It has been used in China for hundreds of years to treat psoriasis and diseases of various internal . . . — Map (db m144682) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ceanothus americanusNew Jersey Tea
The Menomini believed the tea made from the roots to be a cure-all for stomach troubles. — Map (db m144607) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cephalanthus occidentalisButtonbush
The Louisiana Choctaws chewed the bitter bark of this shrub to relieve toothaches. They also drank a strong decoction (extract) of it to treat diarrhea. The leaves have poisoned grazing animals. — Map (db m144625) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Chichorium intybuschicory
During the U.S. Civil War, Confederate soldiers used roasted, ground chicory root as a substitute for coffee, which was scarce during the conflict. Still popular in the southern states, chicory is either mixed with true coffee or prepared by itself. . . . — Map (db m144436) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cladrastis kentukeayellowwood
The Cherokee used the wood of this tree for building and carving. Early settlers in the southern Appalachians used the root bark for dye and the yellow heartwood for gunstocks. Today, yellowwood is popular in urban settings for its resistance to . . . — Map (db m144694) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Comptonia peregrinaSweet Fern
The leaves of this herb were thrown on fires by the Potawatomi of Michigan to create a smudge to deter mosquitos. The Ojibwe used the leaves for a tea to cure stomach cramps. — Map (db m144611) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Corylus americanaHazelnut
This shrub produces a sweet, edible nut. The Cherokee drank a tea made from the bark for hives. — Map (db m144570) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Crocus sativusSaffront Crocus
The stigmas are used in yellow food coloring and flavoring. Chemical analysis of ancient linens and mummies' winding sheets confirms its use as a dye. Today, it is used more as a spice and in cosmetics than as a textile dye. — Map (db m144652) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cunila origanoidesAmerican Dittany
Native peoples of eastern North America drank a tea of this plant to produce sweating when treating fever and colds. — Map (db m144616) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Daucus carota spp. carotaQueen Anne’s Lace
Dioscorides noted that a drink of the seeds was a diuretic, a colic neutralizer, and brought on menses and abortion. The seeds or roots, prepared in wine, were effective in treating wounds from poisonous beasts. — Map (db m144674) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dianthus caryophyllusClove Pink
The flowers have a sweet, clove-like scent and were used by Greeks and Romans in the making of coronets and garlands. In medieval Arabia, they were used in perfumes. An absolute, a refined form of the essential oil, is used in top-quality perfumes . . . — Map (db m144689) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dianthus plumariusCottage Pink
This plant has the same sweet, spicy scent as Dianthus caryophyllus. It has been popular since Renaissance times in nosegays and as an edging plant to scent the garden. — Map (db m144687) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — 82218-H — Dioscorea villosawild yam
Wild yam contains diosgenin, a chemical compound that can be converted in a lab (but not in the human body) to progesterone. This discovery paved the way for the invention of the modern oral contraceptive pill. Today, wild yam is used to calm . . . — Map (db m144627) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Echinacea purpureaPurple Coneflower
The Plains Indians considered this herb to be one of the most important medicinal plants. Its root was the universal antidote for snakebites and all kinds of venomous bites and stings. — Map (db m144605) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Echium vulgareViper's Bugloss
The leaves, root, and seeds were drunk in wine for the prevention or cure of snakebite. The entire plant is poisonous. — Map (db m144673) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Erianthus ravennaeRavenna Grass
Dioscorides reported that Erianthus had much pith and was fit for making books. — Map (db m144664) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eryngium planumEryngo
In Dioscordes' time the young leaves of this prickly plant were pickled in brine and eaten as a pot herb. A drink of 'Eryngum' root diluted in honey liquor was said to cure epilepsy. — Map (db m144654) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Euonymus atropurpureusBurning Bush
The Meskwaki used the fresh outer bark, pounded into a poultice (compress), to heal facial sores. They steeped the inner bark to make an eye lotion. — Map (db m144577) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eupatorium purpureumJoe-Pye Weed
The Menomini used a decoction, or extract, of the root to treat the genitourinary tract. The Potowatomi made a poultice of fresh leaves to treat burns, and the Ojibwe bathed babies in a solution of the root to strengthen them. — Map (db m144569) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eupatorium purpureumBoneset
The northern Iroquois used the leave to make a tea that was considered a tonic and cure for colds and fevers This herb may damage the liver. — Map (db m144612) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Galium mollugoWhite Bedstraw
The roots produce reds similar to madder (Rubia tinctorum), although they are thin and yield less pigment than the thicker madder roots. The seeds of this plant were imported from France by Thomas Jefferson. — Map (db m144649) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Genista tinctoriaDyer's Greenwood
The colonists used this plant to obtain a yellow-green dye from its flowers. The leaves, seeds and flowering plant were also used medically as a diuretic and purgative. — Map (db m144557) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Geranium maculatumWild Geranium
The Meskwaki of Minnesota pounded the astringent root of this geranium in an animal bladder to make a poultice for hemorrhoids. — Map (db m144596) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Gillenia trifoliataIndian Physic
The root furnished an effective purge of the bowels and an emetic to induce vomiting. — Map (db m144626) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hedera helixEnglish Ivy
An infusion of the flowers in wine was drunk for dysentery, and the leaves mixed with fat were used as a burn ointment. Dioscorides believed that drinking the juice caused sterility. The leaves and berries are poisonous. — Map (db m144669) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Helenium flexuosumSneezeweed
According to Cherokee belief, the roots of sneezeweed and Veronica noveboracensis steeped in warm water acted as a contraceptive by preventing menstruation for two years. — Map (db m144614) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Helleborus nigerChristmas Rose
Helleborus was once used to stimulate the heart, expel worms, and promote menstrual flow. It contains cardioglycosides, which help the heart to beat regularly and strongly. Currently regarded as too strong to use safely. — Map (db m144683) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Heuchera americanaRock Geranium
The root, a powerful astringent, was used by Choctaw, Chickasaw and Creek of the Southeast when conditions required an astringent or "puckering" medicine. — Map (db m144613) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hydrastis canadensisGoldenseal
Native American medicinal uses of the root included treatment of the eyes and skin and for cancers and venereal diseases. The yellow root provided dye. This plant should be avoided during pregnancy. — Map (db m144572) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hydrastis canadensisGoldenseal
Historic use for stomach ailments and inflamed eyes has been confirmed. Its antibiotic property makes it useful for vaginal infections. Its antibacterial property may help fight drug-resistant tuberculosis. — Map (db m144681) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ilex vomitoriaYaupon
Yaupon was a common drink of the Southeastern tribes, taken mainly for its emeting (vomit-inducing) action, which was a means of purification. The fruit is poisonous. — Map (db m144604) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Indogofera tinctoriaIndigo
Fragments of indigo-dyed linen from Thebes date back to 3500 B.C. Indigo is just one type of dye in which the color develops in the textile after removal from the dye bath. Upon exposure to the air, fibers change from yellow to blue. — Map (db m144645) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Iris × germanica 'Florentina'Iris
Dioscorides said that the root was fit for use against chill, chest congestion, and coughs. A poultice made with orris and roses in vinegar was said to be good for headaches. The rootstock is toxic. — Map (db m144656) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lavandula angustifoliaLavender
The scent of lavender was much loved, and the flowers were dried and used in linens, in wash water, soaps, oils and powdered. The fragrance warded off evil smells of poor drainage and lack of sanitation. — Map (db m144679) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lindera benzoinSpicebush
The spicy red fruit added flavor to groundhog or opossum as prepared by the Cherokee. The ground nuts also flavored bread. — Map (db m144565) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lobelia inflataIndian Tobacco
The common name for this plant comes from its purported use as a Native American smoke. It was used by the Seneca as an emetic (vomit-inducer) and for coughs. The whole plant is poisonous. — Map (db m144621) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lychnis coronariaRose Campion
According to Dioscorides, the seeds drunk with wine helped those who had been bitten by a scorpion. — Map (db m144672) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — 53002-H — Magnolia virginianasweetbay magnolia
American Indians used the leaves of this small tree to make a medicinal tea for the treatment of chills, colds, and other ailments. Early American physicians used it as a quinine substitute as well as to treat gout, rheumatism, and respiratory . . . — Map (db m144692) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Malus 'Roxbury'Apple
Apples were very important to the colonists. They provided a source of fruit for eating, apple butter and cider. Before cold storage, the Roxbury variety was a favorite late winter apple. — Map (db m144440) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Matthiola incanaStock
These flowers have spicy scent similar to Dianthus, and the fragrance grows stronger at night. They are used in bouquets and potpourri, and the scent was used in early Arab and Greek perfumes. — Map (db m144691) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mentha spicataSpearmint
Although most commonly used by the colonists to flavor food and drink, mint was also used to whiten teeth, prevent milk from curdling and to strew on floors to repel bad smells and insects. — Map (db m144639) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mertensia virginicaVirginia Bluebells
The Cherokee used this plant for whooping cough and consumption. — Map (db m144608) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mitchella repensPartridge-berry
The St. Lawrence Montagnai considered the cooked berries a fever medicine. The dried leaves were added to Chippewa smoking mixtures. — Map (db m144622) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgareOregano
This versatile herb was used by colonists to alleviate toothaches, flavor food and strew on floors, as well as flavor ale. The flowering tops were used to produce a reddish brown dye. — Map (db m144633) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgareWild Marjoram
The leaves are steam distilled to produce an oil that has a spicy, aromatic scent. The early Greeks, Egyptians, and Arabs all used it in their perfumes. Today, it appears in many perfumes and soaps, especially men's fragrances. The leaves and . . . — Map (db m144686) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtumGreek Oregano
Dioscorides reported that above-ground parts, taken with wine, were good for those who had drunk the juice of the poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) or the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). — Map (db m144663) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Osmorhiza calytoniiSweet Cicely
Sweet Cicely roots taste and smell like anise. Oil from the roots contains sugar, fats, resins and tannin. Chippewa Indians women drank the tea of the roots to aid in childbirth. — Map (db m144601) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Osmunda cinnamomeaCinnamon Fern
In the spring, the Menomini limited their diet to the young coiled fern tips (croziers) so that their bodies had the scent of the fern. This allowed them to get close to deer to hunt them. — Map (db m144566) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phlomis fruticosaJerusalem Sage
The leaves soaked in water were laid upon swollen, inflamed eyes. Dioscorides also noted that just a knucklebone's length of the root, given with wine, could bind excessive intestinal discharges. — Map (db m144668) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phytolacca americanaPoke
The Pamunkey of Virginia treated rheumatism with boiled poke berries. Several tribes used berry pigments as a dye. All parts of the plant are poisonous. — Map (db m144571) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phytolacca americanaPoke
Native Americans made use of poke berries as a body paint. Later the Colonists found it an inexpensive source of red dye for woolens. Young leaves yield brilliant yellows on wool. Caution: poisonous — Map (db m144660) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Polemonium reptansJacob's Ladder
The roots were used by the Meskwaki Indians of Wisconsin to induce vomiting. They called the plant 'fine hair woman medicine'. — Map (db m144623) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Polygonatum biflorumSmall Solomon's Seal
This plant was called the "reviver" by the Menomini and Fox because inhaling the smoke of the heated root revived unconscious patients. — Map (db m144578) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosa virginianaPasture Rose
North-central Native Americans made a medicine with the rose hip skin for stomach troubles. — Map (db m144603) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosmarinus officinalisRosemary
Rosemary has an ancient history in the Mediterranean as an incense and perfume. It was the main ingredient in Hungary Water, one of the earliest European perfumes created for the Queen of Hungary in A.D. 1370. The scent became popular throughout . . . — Map (db m144437) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosmarinus officinalisRosemary
Rosemary was a favorite herb for cooking and strewing. As a symbol of remembrance and fidelity, it was added to wedding cakes and puddings, as well as tossed into coffins at funerals. — Map (db m144636) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosmarinus officinalisrosemary
Rosemary contains several volatile oils, tannins, bittering compounds, and resins, which are thought to contribute to the increased potency and extended preservation of beers brewed with it. It has been used medicinally for centuries to improve . . . — Map (db m144695) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rubia tinctorumMadder
Having been used since at least 2000 B.C., the reddish orange roots contain several dye substances. It was used to dye the British redcoats and was best known as the source of Turkey red on linen and cotton textiles. — Map (db m144650) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ruscus aculeatusButcher's Broom
According to Dioscorides, leaves and berries were drunk in wine to encourage menstruation, to break up bladder stones, and to cure jaundice and headache. This mixture could also be used as a diuretic. — Map (db m144657) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Salvia lyrataLyre-leaved Sage
The roots of this sage were used by Native Americans to make a salve for sores. — Map (db m144620) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Salvia sclareaClary Sage
Clary wine was considered an aphrodisiac in the sixteenth century. The bitter aromatic leaves flavor wine, ale, beer and liqueurs. — Map (db m144693) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Satureja douglasiiYerba Buena
The Cahuilla of southern California believed a tea made from this plant to be an effective remedy for reducing fevers and curing colds. — Map (db m144618) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Satureja montanaWinter Savory
Colonists brought winter savory over to the new world to flavor dishes, stuffings to meat, fish and sausages. Leaves were taken to stimulate the appetite and to aid in digestion. — Map (db m144634) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Smilacina racemosaPlumelily
Smoke from the burning root was used by the Meskwaki to revive unconscious patients, to hush a crying child, and to cast spells. — Map (db m144573) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Solidago canadensisCanada Goldenrod
The Potowami called it "yellow top" and made a tea of the flowers to treat fevers. — Map (db m144615) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Symphytum officinaleComfrey
A lotion or mixture of the fresh or dried leaves or roots was used for bruises, wounds and sores. — Map (db m144676) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Symphytum officinaleComfrey
Used for thousands of years to treat bruises and sprains, the plant contains compounds, such as allantoin, that promote healing and other substances that are anti-inflammatory. There is controversy concerning its safety, especially for internal use, . . . — Map (db m144680) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Tanacetum balsamitaCostmary
This plant was used by the colonists in a favorite spring tonic known as "Sweet Mary tea." It was also widely used throughout eastern Massachusetts in nosegays or as bookmarkers to enjoy during long sermons. — Map (db m144637) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Tanacetum vulgareTansy
Tansy tea was taken to calm cramps, but colonists also used tansy leaves as an insect repellant in their homes. Leaves were also rubbed on fresh meats to keep flies off. — Map (db m144559) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Teucrium chamaedrysWall Germander
Dioscorides reported that a beverage of the fruiting plant was drunk for convulsions and coughs. It was taken with wine by those who were bitten by poisonous beasts. — Map (db m144675) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Trillium grandiflorumLarge Flowered Trillium
A decoction of the root was used for female diseases and to bring on childbirth by some tribes; others used it to treat headaches and rheumatism. — Map (db m144606) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vaccinium corymbosumHighbush Bluberry
The Chippewa made pemmican (high-energy food) by adding dried blueberries to moose fat and deer tallow. Native Americans also made a tea of blueberry roots to treat diarrhea and to ease childbirth. — Map (db m144610) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Valeriana officinalisValerian
Tradition says the Pied Piper carried valerian root in his back pocket to help lure the rats out of Hamelin. The root has an offensive scent similar to Limburger cheese, but is also musky and balsamic and is used in perfumery in India and the Far . . . — Map (db m144690) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Veronicastrum virginicumCulver's Root
The black roots contain a substance with powerful emetic (vomit-inducing) and cathartic (bowel-purging) properties which was used by the Senecas and Menomini. This root is potentially toxic. — Map (db m144602) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vinca minorPeriwinkle
Periwinkle was used by the colonists to make soothing ointments for the skin. Fresh leaves were used to stop bleeding, externally and internally. — Map (db m144555) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vinca minorPeriwinkle
Dioscorides suggested that the leaves be chewed for toothache and applied as a poultice for snakebite. He prescribed a drink of the leaves and stalks in wine for dysentery. — Map (db m144678) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vitex agnus-castusChaste Tree
Dioscorides noted that chaste maidens used the plant for bedding. He recommended burning leaves to fumigate venomous beasts. A poultice of the leaves relieved stings. — Map (db m144677) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Yucca filamentosaAdam's Needle
The Native Americans had been using the leaves since time immemorial to make twine and cordage. Men on Raleigh's second voyage to Virginia in 1586 noticed its economic potential. — Map (db m144564) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Zingiber officinaleGinger
Used as early as 3000 B.C. in China where it was prescribed for colds, fever, and leprosy, among other ailments. It was also used medicinally in ancient Greece and India. Research has identified constituents that have anti-inflammatory qualities, . . . — Map (db m144685) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dawn Redwood from China(Metasequoia glyptostroboides)
This small grove of Dawn Redwood is somewhat reminiscent of the few stands that occur in its native homeland, China. Known only through paleobotanical records prior to 1945, living specimens of this almost extinct plant were discovered in that year . . . — Map (db m144582) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dioscorides Garden
These herbs planted here are a representative selection from plants listed about 60 A.D by the Greek physician, Dioscorides. The modern science of pharmacology is traced back to his efforts to list systematically the plants that were used for . . . — Map (db m144439) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Medicinal Garden
This garden illustrates the historic and current use of herbs as medicine. Plants have played an integral part in illness and disease treatment for thousands of years. By observation, trial, and error, people learned which plants had healing . . . — Map (db m144438) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — The Knot Garden
The formal knot expresses the traditional elegance of the garden design which originated in Europe during the 16th century. Knot garden designs are geometrically patterned on a level site with plants arranged so they may be pruned to follow a . . . — Map (db m144435) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — The Man Who Loved Conifers
Would your hobby take you to the four corners of the world? Few private plant collectors have approached their hobby with more enthusiasm than the late William Gotelli who travelled the world in search of unusual conifers, collecting more than . . . — Map (db m144583) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — Hurrah!Karol Murlak with Danielle Begnaud, Katarzyna Michnowska, and Marzena Krupa — 2019 • Stainless steel —
The Embassy of the Republic of Poland in Washington, D.C., the Golden Triangle Business Improvement District, and the Polish Cultural Institute present Hurrah!, a celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the diplomatic relations between . . . — Map (db m144515) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — Growing here19th Street Rain Gardens — Gold is Green —
The seed of the Swamp Milkweed contains buoyant white tufts, effective for seed dispersal and once used for pillows and life-jackets during WWII. — Map (db m144512) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — Growing here19th Street Rain Gardens — Gold is Green —
European explorers were so enamored by the Cardinal Flower that it quickly made its way from the US and Canada to European gardens by the 1630s. — Map (db m144514) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — Layers + LinesGolden Triangle Arts
[Northern plaque at the Connecticut Avenue overlook, just south of Dupont Circle:] Nekisha Durrett Up 'Til Now © 2019 Reclaimed hemlock, polycarbonate, LED lighting, found architectural elements, reducing lens, natural and . . . — Map (db m144540) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — Alice Moore Dunbar [Nelson] and Paul Laurence Dunbar ResidenceAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1934 Fourth Street, NW —
Alice Moore Dunbar [Nelson] (1875-1935), a budding poet and essayist, and Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906), already a nationally and internationally acclaimed poet, married in 1898 and moved to this house. Mary Church Terrell, an activist and . . . — Map (db m144576) HM
Florida (Flagler County), Bunnell — Our Heroes
Dedicated to all who have served who are serving who will serve in defense of freedom — Map (db m144109) WM
Florida (Flagler County), Palm Coast — 8 — Caretaker’s ResidenceWashington Oaks Historic District
Owen and Louise Young retained several staff members to tend the gardens, orchards, buildings and farm animals. No employee was more devoted to Mr. and Mrs. Young than Francisco Lopez, who served as the Young’s cook, chauffeur and groundskeeper . . . — Map (db m144839) HM
Florida (Flagler County), Palm Coast — 1 — Coquina ColumnsWashington Oaks Historic District
The coquina columns to the left stood alongside the original Highway A1A and served as the entrance gate to the Youngs’ winter residence. Coquina, a sedimentary rock made by sand, shells and water, is abundant at Washington Oaks on the Atlantic . . . — Map (db m144842) HM
Florida (Flagler County), Palm Coast — Flight Of Life Sculpture #7
Dedicated to sixteen fellow army soldiers killed and twenty five seriously wounded in a horrific friendly fire accident on September 2, 1960 – at Garfenwohr, Germany Thank you to all past, present & future veterans for their sacrifices . . . — Map (db m144352) HM

493 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers were listed. Next 293
Paid Advertisement