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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Mercury-Redstone: Putting the First Americans in Space

 
 
Mercury-Redstone: Putting the First Americans in Space Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 5, 2019
1. Mercury-Redstone: Putting the First Americans in Space Marker
Inscription.  

Mercury-Redstone: Putting the First Americans in Space
Mercury capsules were small, one-man spacecraft. The Mercury-Redstone rocket was designed to propel these capsules and the first American astronauts into space during Project Mercury.

The Mercury-Redstone rocket launched six suborbital Mercury flights in 1960 to 1961. Two of these flights were un-manned tests, one flight carried Ham, the chimpanzee. Two Mercury-Redstone flights made history when they took the first and second Americans into space.

Alan Shepard, the first American in space, is pictured above in his Mercury Freedom 7 capsule. NASA's first two manned flights were suborbital. Orbital flights were launched by the Mercury-Atlas rocket.

The Mercury Faith 7 capsule that flew 22 orbits around Earth in 1963 is on display at Space Center Houston

Two astronauts launched into space on Mercury-Redstone rockets:
Alan Shepard May 5, 1961
Gus Grissom July 21, 1961
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Air & Space.
 
Location. 29° 33.271′ N, 95° 
The previous Mercury-Redstone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 31, 2017
2. The previous Mercury-Redstone Marker
This previous marker read:

A one-man spacecraft-booster combination like this one propelled the first two American astronauts (Al Shepard and Gus Grissom) into Space in May and July of 1961. Al Shepard's spacecraft reached an altitude of 101 nautical miles in a ballistic arc above the Earth. The flight lasted about 15-1/2 minutes and Shepard was weightless for over five minutes. The vehicle reached a velocity of over 5,000 miles per hour and landed 236 miles downrange. At liftoff, the vehicle weighed about 66,000 pounds. Propellants included ethyl alcohol, water, and liquid oxygen. A single A-7 engine powered the vehicle into space.
5.623′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker is on E. NASA Pkwy half a mile north of Point Lookout Drive, on the right when traveling west. Located next to the Saturn Rocket Building in Johnson Space Flight Center. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston TX 77058, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. F-1 Engine: Power for the Rocket (here, next to this marker); J-2 Engine: Versatile Sidekick (here, next to this marker); H-1 Engine: A Powerful Start (a few steps from this marker); Little Joe II (a few steps from this marker); Little Joe II and BP-22: Safety First (a few steps from this marker); Saturn V Rocket (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Apollo Mission Control Center (approx. 0.4 miles away); Seito and Kiyoaki Saibara (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
Also see . . .  NASA Johnson Space Flight Center. (Submitted on April 12, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Mercury-Redstone Rocket image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 31, 2017
3. Mercury-Redstone Rocket
Mercury-Redstone: Putting the First Americans in Space Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 5, 2019
4. Mercury-Redstone: Putting the First Americans in Space Marker
Note the marker on the rocket's base in this view.
The Mercury Faith 7 (MA-9) capsule at NASA Johnson Space Center image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 5, 2019
5. The Mercury Faith 7 (MA-9) capsule at NASA Johnson Space Center
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 17, 2019. It was originally submitted on April 12, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 284 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 17, 2019, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   2, 3. submitted on April 12, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   4, 5. submitted on October 17, 2019, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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Oct. 20, 2020