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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
West Columbia in Lexington County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Doolittle Raiders

 
 
The Doolittle Raiders Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, September 27, 2008
1. The Doolittle Raiders Marker
Inscription.  
In February 1942, twenty-four B-25 bomber crews of the 17th Bombardment Group at Columbia Army Air Base volunteered to take part in a secret project headed by Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle. This group was the nucleus of the Doolittle Raiders who, taking off from the aircraft carrier "Hornet," bombed Tokyo on April 18, 1942.
 
Erected 1979 by South Carolina Department, Council of Abandoned Military Posts. (Marker Number 32-13B.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Air & SpaceWar, World II. A significant historical month for this entry is February 1942.
 
Location. 33° 56.873′ N, 81° 7.675′ W. Marker is in West Columbia, South Carolina, in Lexington County. Marker is on Airport Boulevard near the "Cell-phone" Parking lot. Marker is near the Columbia Metropolitan Airport. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: West Columbia SC 29170, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Columbia Army Air Base / The Doolittle Raiders (here, next to this marker); 319th Bombardment Group (here, next to this marker); Bombardment Groups (here,
The Doolittle Raiders Marker, looking west, at the "Cell Phone Lot", Columbia Metropolitan Airport image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. The Doolittle Raiders Marker, looking west, at the "Cell Phone Lot", Columbia Metropolitan Airport
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next to this marker); Springdale (approx. 1.3 miles away); Camp Moore (approx. 2.8 miles away); The Sycamore Tree (approx. 2.9 miles away); Congaree Fort (approx. 3 miles away); The Cherokee Path (approx. 3.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in West Columbia.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. other Doolittle Raiders' South Carolina tribute
 
Also see . . .
1. Doolittle Raiders. Children of the Doolittle Raiders website entry:
The North American B-25B twin engine bomber was selected by Lt. Col. James A Doolittle for the mission due to its range, power and its two thousand-pound bomb load. (Submitted on October 2, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. The Doolittle Raid,. Wikipedia entry:
"The Japanese had been told they were invulnerable. An attack on the Japanese homeland would cause confusion in the minds of the Japanese people and sow doubt about the reliability of their leaders. There was a second, equally important, psychological reason for this attack...Americans badly needed a morale boost." James H. Doolittle (Submitted on October 2, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
The Doolittle Raiders Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. The Doolittle Raiders Marker
 

3. Columbia Journal; Doolittle Raiders Recall 30 Seconds in History. Published in the New York Times, Thursday, April 16, 1992. (Submitted on August 17, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

4. 17th Bombardment Group. Wikipedia entry (Submitted on May 21, 2022, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
The Doolittle Raiders used B-25s like this image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2003
4. The Doolittle Raiders used B-25s like this
A Doolittle Raider's B-25 lifts-off from the USS Hornet image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Wikipedia
5. A Doolittle Raider's B-25 lifts-off from the USS Hornet
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 21, 2022. It was originally submitted on October 2, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,925 times since then and 85 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 2, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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May. 23, 2022