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Fulton Fish Market and Pier 17

Pier 17, Benjamin Thompson & Associates, 1987-92

 

— Exploring Downtown —

 
Fulton Fish Market and Pier 17 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 2010
1. Fulton Fish Market and Pier 17 Marker
Inscription.  
Fulton Fish Market
South Street Seaport recently lost its famously pungent neighbor, New York’s Fulton Fish Market. Founded in the early 19th century, the market occupied a ramshackle collection of buildings that came to life in the earliest hours of the morning. Some 180 years of fishmongering on these streets finally ended on November 14th, 2005, as the market – largest of its kind in the country – moved to 400,000 square feet of modern facilities in Hunts Point in the Bronx.

Pier 17
Pier 17 stretches out into the East River, a three story class and steel pavilion forming part of the Rouse Company’s original plans for the South Street Seaport. General Growth Properties, which acquired the Seaport in 2004, is planning new residential and retail development, including restaurants, hotels and a community center- as well as expanded open space and water vistas. The rambling 1907 Tin Building from fish market days will be preserved and relocated to the end of the Pier, perched at the water’s edge. In nice weather, visitors can climb the Pier’s outside staircases to the upper level, stretch out on a deck chair and
"Heritage Trails" version image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 2000
2. "Heritage Trails" version
The earlier marker did not feature Pier 17 in the title.
feel like they’ve landed a berth on an ocean liner – enjoying Downtown’s famous silhouette views of the bridges up river, the Brooklyn port down river, and Brooklyn Heights beckoning on the opposite shore.
 
Erected by Alliance for Downtown New York.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 40° 42.379′ N, 74° 0.146′ W. Marker was in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker could be reached from South Street near Fulton Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: New York NY 10038, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Fulton Fish Waist - 142 Beekman Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 206 Front Street (about 300 feet away); High Water Mark (about 300 feet away); 203 Front Street (about 300 feet away); Urban Archeology/Then and Now (about 400 feet away); Archaeological Discovery/Making Land (about 400 feet away); 207 - 211 Water Street (about 400 feet away); Peking (was about 400 feet away but has been reported permanently removed. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker. The marker was probably removed after the original Pier 17 building was demolished in 2014. This entry is for archival purposes.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Pier 17, 1999 image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, December 1999
3. Pier 17, 1999
Fulton Fish Market, 1999 image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 1999
4. Fulton Fish Market, 1999
The new (and still incomplete) Pier 17, 1999 image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 19, 2019
5. The new (and still incomplete) Pier 17, 1999
Fulton Fish Market, 2019 image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 19, 2019
6. Fulton Fish Market, 2019
The Tin Building, moved to a new location and undergoing reconstruction.
 

More. Search the internet for Fulton Fish Market and Pier 17.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 24, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 24, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 52 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 24, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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