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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bethesda in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 6

The District of Columbia Boundary Stones

 
 
The District of Columbia Boundary Stones Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, July 18, 2019
1. The District of Columbia Boundary Stones Marker
Inscription.  In 1790, Congress authorized the establishment of a territory 10 miles square on the Potomac River to be the Capital of the United States. It was President Washington's recommendation to use land on both sides of the river. Surveyor Andrew Ellicott, notified in 1791 to proceed with designating the Federal Boundary by Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, hired astronomer Benjamin Banneker, a free black man. Together they established the location of 40 sandstone markers set at one mile intervals on land ceded by Maryland and Virginia for the Nation's Capital. Virginia reclaimed her lands in 1846. The stone in this park, set in 1792 at the time of the Maryland Boundary Survey, is Northwest Number 6. Establishing the location at six miles north of the West Corner Stone. The Boundary Stones are considered the first monuments erected by the United States.
 
Erected by Montgomery County Park Commission, Department of Parks.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Original Federal Boundary Stones marker series.
 
Location. 38° 57.295′ 
The District of Columbia Boundary Stones Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, July 18, 2019
2. The District of Columbia Boundary Stones Marker
N, 77° 5.616′ W. Marker is in Bethesda, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Western Avenue east of Park Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4957 Western Avenue, Washington DC 20016, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Bayard (approx. 0.2 miles away in District of Columbia); The Washington and Glen Echo Railroad (approx. half a mile away); Early Commerce (approx. half a mile away in District of Columbia); Early Inhabitants (approx. 0.6 miles away in District of Columbia); "Oh, It's You, Welcome!" (approx. 0.7 miles away); Set in Stone (approx. 0.7 miles away in District of Columbia); Churches and Cemeteries (approx. 0.7 miles away in District of Columbia); Luis Alves De Lima E Silva (approx. mile away in District of Columbia).
 
Categories. African AmericansGovernment & PoliticsPolitical Subdivisions
 

More. Search the internet for Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 6.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 11, 2019. This page originally submitted on July 18, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Last updated on October 11, 2019, by Roberto Bernate of Arlington, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 18, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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