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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Fort Granger

Sally Port and Abatis

 
 
Fort Granger Sally Port and Abatis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
1. Fort Granger Sally Port and Abatis Marker
Inscription.  Directly ahead is Fort Granger’s original entrance and exit, known in military parlance as the sally port. With the completion of the fort in the spring of 1863, Union soldiers had enough artillery to protect the entrance from Confederate cavalry attack. Cannons positioned to either side of the sally port provided deadly crossfire.

The sally port was a narrow passageway that offered a way to convey men, supplies, and equipment into the fort. Nearly every surrounding trench line and earthworks had rows of abatis, felled trees with their branches sharpened, which protruded from the earthen wall. The abatis functioned like modern-day barbed wire and were very difficult to penetrate. While a seemingly effective and widely used obstacle during the war, creating abatis removed many trees, quickly leaving towns such as Franklin barren.

The sally port served as a way out of the fort to the railroad and the Federal camp to the north. A secure passage to the town, however, was not north of the fort. Pvt. Charles S. Falkler, 92nd Illinois Infantry, noted in letters written on March 19 and April 13, 1863: “They are building a
Fort Granger Sally Port and Abatis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
2. Fort Granger Sally Port and Abatis Marker
The interior opening is beyond the sign.
rousing old fort here and yesterday two big siege guns came in on cars and they now have them mounted. … Our camp is on this side of the Big Harpeth and the town of Franklin is on the other side of the river from us. We have a pontoon bridge to cross over the town.”
 
Erected by Historic Franklin Parks.
 
Location. 35° 55.518′ N, 86° 51.535′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eddy Lane near Fort Granger Park Drive, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Fort Granger (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Granger (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 600 feet away); Fort Granger Federal Garrison (approx. 0.3 miles away); Retreat Action at Franklin (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The sally port image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
3. The sally port
The narrow track is visible.
The enterior path to/from the sally port image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 22, 2017
4. The enterior path to/from the sally port
The sally port is to the left; troops on the earthworks had multiple clear fields of fire to defend it.
Inset - A sally port and abatis image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
5. Inset - A sally port and abatis
Inset - Siege gun image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
6. Inset - Siege gun
Inset - Ditch and abatis image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
7. Inset - Ditch and abatis
Fort Granger Sally Port marker, 2007 image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 2007
8. Fort Granger Sally Port marker, 2007
The earlier version of the marker.
 

More. Search the internet for Fort Granger.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 23, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 20, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 42 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 20, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   7, 8. submitted on November 23, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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