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Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Free African Americans of Oxon Hill

 
 
Free African Americans of Oxon Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 1, 2020
1. Free African Americans of Oxon Hill Marker
Inscription.  
Free Blacks Owned Parts of Oxon Hill Manor

By the end of the 1700s, there were a number of free African American families living in the Oxon Hill area. Several of these free blacks were manumitted by members of the Addison family, including brothers John Addison, Thomas G. Addison, Rev. Walter Dulany Addison and their cousin Anthony Addison.

Charles Beall, a free black man, purchased his wife, Henny and their children from Thomas G. Addison and manumitted them in 1796. Beall also manumitted Thomas and Margaret Moore in 1809.

Between 1812 and 1818, Charles Beall acquired about 113 acres of Oxon Hill Manor from Rev. Walter Dulany Addison. Methodist preachers who visited Oxon Hill in the 1790s noted the presence of a meeting house in the area. Charles Beall dedicated a ½ acre of his Oxon Hill land for the construction of a Methodist Episcopal Church. A later church on this tract was destroyed by fire in the 1950s and all that remains is the burial ground.

Several of the Addisons' freed slaves settled on Addison land along the east side of the Anacostia River in Washington,
Free African Americans of Oxon Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 1, 2020
2. Free African Americans of Oxon Hill Marker
DC in the 1830s. By the 1860s the communities of Anacostia, Stantontown or Hillsdale, and Good Hope were largely occupied by free blacks, including members of the Addison and Moore families. The 1878 Hopkins Atlas of 15 Miles Around Washington Including County of Prince George, Maryland shows Addisons and Moores in the Good Hope and Stantontown communities in Southeast Washington. Many of their descendents still reside on this land.

African-Americans of Good Hope

Lemuel Robert Addison (1881 - unknown) and his wife Mary Ellen Moore (1882-1976) were among several African-American families living in Good Hope during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Mary Ellen Moore was a descendent of Thomas Moore, an Oxon Hill slave who was manumitted by Charles Beall in 1809. After obtaining his freedom, Moore lived for a time in the Oxon Hill community before moving to Good Hope in the years prior to the Civil War.
 
Location. 38° 47.821′ N, 77° 0.225′ W. Marker is in Oxon Hill, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on MGM National Avenue just west of Oxon Hill Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oxon Hill MD 20745, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Hanson (here, next to this marker); Addison Family at National Harbor (here, next to
Walter Dulany Addison image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
3. Walter Dulany Addison
Close-up of image on marker
this marker); "Salubria" (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named John Hanson (approx. ¼ mile away); Judah and Resistance (approx. ¼ mile away); Salubria Changed the Future of the Potomac Valley (approx. ¼ mile away); Slavery in the Potomac Valley (approx. 0.3 miles away); Dr. John H. Bayne: A Leader In His Community (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oxon Hill.
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionSettlements & Settlers
 
Manumission Papers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
4. Manumission Papers
These papers were drawn up for Charles Beall for his wife, Henny. (Liber JRM5 Folio 402)

Know all men by these presents that I Charles Beall of Prince Georges county and state of Maryland do hereby manumit and set free my wife Henny and all her increase and I hereby release unto her the said Henny and all her increase as aforesaid all my right and claim whatsoever to their person and services as slave or to any estate which they may here after acquire hereby declaring the said slaves to be free from the date hereof without any interruption form me or any person claiming under me my heirs executers or administrators, In witness thereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this twenty ninth day, June seventeen hundred and ninety six signed, sealed and delivered.
His
     Charles + Beall {Seal}
Mark
Close-up of photo on marker
1878 Hopkins Map image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
5. 1878 Hopkins Map
Map showing the settlement of Moore and Addison Families in Stantontown and Good Hope.
Oxon Hill Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress - Chronicling America
6. Oxon Hill Methodist Episcopal Church
from An Old Maryland Church by George Simmons Washington Evening Star Dec. 12, 1891. The church is described as being over 70 years ago and located in a “spacious fenced yard” with a cemetery located west of the church yard.
Lemuel Robert Addison, b. 1881 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
7. Lemuel Robert Addison, b. 1881
Close-up of photo on marker
Mary Ellen Moore (1882-1976) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
8. Mary Ellen Moore (1882-1976)
Close-up of photo on marker
 

More. Search the internet for Free African Americans of Oxon Hill.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 15, 2020. This page originally submitted on January 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 67 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on January 6, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6, 7, 8. submitted on January 9, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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