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Spotsylvania Courthouse in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

An Ordinary on the Road to Snell

Spotsylvania Court House National Historic District

 
 
An Ordinary on the Road to Snell Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), April 18, 2020
1. An Ordinary on the Road to Snell Marker
Inscription.  
The exact date of the building of the Ordinary on the road from Fredericksburg to Snell is a mystery. The earliest date we can attribute is 1770. It may have existed prior, but unproven by current evidence. In 1799, the property and Ordinary, which over time would be called the "Tavern Tract" was owned by John Herndon. Herndon sold the property and 325 acres surrounding it to John F. Alsop and Alsop's brother-in-law, Thomas Hicks Sr. Hicks also operated an ordinary established in 1781 at the County Courthouse on the Po River.

John F. Alsop died suddenly in 1810 without a will, and the property reverted to his father, Samuel Alsop Sr. Samuel Alsop Jr. acquired the property from his father, brothers and sister-in-law Lucy Alsop Hicks. He continued to purchase additional tracts in the vicinity and would eventually amass 1,034 acres.

From 1799, until the sale of the Ordinary in 1836, Alsop's Tavern was known for its "private" entertainment and dining. Samuel, as part of the sale, reserved a small tract of land as a "burying ground," where his wife Dorothea rested. Later in 1856, Samuel Alsop would build Berea Church
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on the site and after passing in 1859 at age 83, would join Dorothea in the "burying ground".

[Captions:]
Alsop held horse races on a regular basis. A $150 purse was quite a sum of money in this 1834 advertisement in the Virginia Herald.

Alsop's Ordinary license in 1829 promised there would be no unlawful gaming on Sunday or allow any person to tipple and drink more than was necessary.

Alsop would decide to sell his tavern in 1836. The lising in the Virginia Herald enticed Lewis Rawlings to purchase it.

In the 1700's, an Ordinary was a lodging site that served regular meals.

 
Erected by Spotsylvania County Museum, County of Spotsylvania, Virginia.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesColonial EraIndustry & Commerce. In addition, it is included in the Virginia, Spotsylvania County Museum series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1770.
 
Location. 38° 12.072′ N, 77° 35.38′ W. Marker is in Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is at the intersection of Brock Road (County Road 613) and Courthouse Road (State Route 208), on the right when traveling east on Brock Road
An Ordinary on the Road to Snell Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), April 18, 2020
2. An Ordinary on the Road to Snell Marker
. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9064 Courthouse Road, Spotsylvania VA 22553, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Samuel Alsop Jr. (here, next to this marker); A Tavern at the New Courthouse (here, next to this marker); Joseph Sanford's Inn & Tavern (here, next to this marker); A Tavern in the Midst of Battle (here, next to this marker); Time Passages (a few steps from this marker); Lee’s Headquarters (a few steps from this marker); A Final Journey (within shouting distance of this marker); Legend, Lore and Fact (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Spotsylvania Courthouse.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 18, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 18, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 344 times since then and 88 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 18, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Jun. 20, 2024