Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Chester in Hancock County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

World's Largest Teapot

 
 
World's Largest Teapot Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, September 10, 2020
1. World's Largest Teapot Marker
Inscription.  
[Significantly unreadable]
After being closed for two years during World War II (when gas rationing caused a decrease in traffic to the Teapot and Devon's pottery business were sold to Mary Wucherer and Rhelda Cain in 1947. Food was again sold out of the Teapot until the late 1960's when it was used to sell lawn and garden items as well as china and novelty pieces.

The Teapot had been painted blue and white by this time and was sold to Cecil and Alice Fletcher who continued to sell pottery and other gift items from it for many years before they finally closed both their business and the Teapot.

The Teapot sat abandoned until 1984 when C&P Telephone purchased the land. The building of the former business was demolished and the Teapot was in danger of being scrapped. Geneva Hill, a Chester native, brought citizens to action to save the Teapot from destruction.

C&P Telephone offered to donate the Teapot to the City of Chester. A restoration committee was formed by Councilwoman Anne Ford and the town overwhelmingly approved the restoration of the Teapot and fundraising plans were made. the Teapot was moved
World's Largest Teapot Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, September 10, 2020
2. World's Largest Teapot Marker
to various places in Chester while the $3000 restoration funds were raised. Repair work eventually began on the floor and roof joints. The exterior tin of the Teapot was sandblasted for cleaning but it caused wrinkling in some places. As the repair work continued there was much debate between the State Highway Department and various townspeople over where the Teapot should be permanently located. This debate continued for a number of years during which time bad weather created new problems. It was [unreadable].

[Significantly unreadable]

Two decades pass with normal wear and tear taking its toll. Having raised funds for other town projects, the town council appointed Chester native Susan Badgley Hineman as the Project Manager to raise $15,000 required for a complete renovation. With the assistance of volunteers, Susan was able to utilize social media via the Internet to raise the entire amount in only six months. To ensure the safety of the Teapot's future, she requested that an annual Teapot Day be held when festivities could generate funds for the Teapot's ongoing maintenance. The first annual Teapot Day was held in Chester, West Virginia on Saturday, August 8, 2015.
 
Erected by Town of Chester, West Virginia.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Charity & Public Work
World's Largest Teapot image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, September 10, 2020
3. World's Largest Teapot
Industry & CommerceNotable Places.
 
Location. Marker has been reported unreadable. 40° 36.965′ N, 80° 33.426′ W. Marker is in Chester, West Virginia, in Hancock County. Marker is at the intersection of Carolina Avenue and Old U.S. 30, on the right when traveling east on Carolina Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 751 Carolina Ave, Chester WV 26034, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this location, measured as the crow flies. Rock Spring Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Pottery Capital of America (approx. one mile away in Ohio); Ohio's Gateway (approx. one mile away in Ohio); Potters National Bank Building (approx. 1.1 miles away in Ohio); The Lincoln Highway (approx. 1.1 miles away in Ohio); Central School (approx. 1.1 miles away in Ohio); Bradshaw's Hall (approx. 1.1 miles away in Ohio); Carnegie Public Library (approx. 1.1 miles away in Ohio).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 13, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 31 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 13, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A wide shot of the marker in context • Can you help?
Paid Advertisement
Jan. 21, 2021